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Progressive men of the stat, 
ot Montana 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



99 1 



but at the end of a year returned to his home, re- 
maining over winter. In the spring he took a 
trip to Iowa and there stayed until 1887, when he 
came to Montana, arriving at Billings April 2. 
After railroading there for a year, he removed to 
Red Lodge and worked on the cattle ranch of T. 
P. McDonald. He then leased the boarding house 
of the Rocky Fork Coal Company, and later ran 
the engine for the company. He passed the sum- 
mer of 1891 at Castle, and in the autumn returned 
to Carbon county, where he engaged in the sheep 
business. In 1893 he began a six-years residence 
in the Big Horn basin, being there extensively en- 
gaged in the sheep business, having at times 6,000 
head. In 1899 he bought a ranch near Bridger 
which he conducted for a year, then sold it and 
bought his present ranch, six miles south of 
Bridger. On this, which is well irrigated and un- 
der good cultivation, he has a fine herd of Here- 
ford cattle and raises large crops of alfalfa. He 
also owned a ranch on the other side of the river, 
which he sold in 1901. Mr. Barclay was married 
December 29, 1887, to Miss Rachel Hobbs, of 
Wisconsin, a sister of John G. Hobbs, mentioned 
at length elsewhere in this work. They have two 
children : Rex Lionel and Wandafie. 



ALBERT D. BARNEY.— This popular mer- 
chant of Philbrook, Fergus county, is dis- 
tinctively a product of American civilization in 
its best expression. He is a native of Sandusky, 
Ohio, where his life began May 29, 1875. His 
parents were Franklin and Delia Barney, natives 
of Canada who settled in Ohio in early days. The 
father is a stonemason by trade, a prosperous 
mechanic, a good citizen, and locally prominent 
in Democratic politics. 

Albert D. Barney, the sixth of their nine children, 
remained with his parents until he was nineteen 
years old, receiving a common school education. 
After leaving school he devoted his time to farm- 
ing, photographing between times, as an avoca- 
tion. In 1899 he removed to the west, locating at 
Rockford, Fergus county, Mont., where he en- 
gaged in the mercantile business. After conducting 
this with good success for a year, he sold it to 
his older brother, William, with whom he remained 
as clerk and salesman for a few months, when he 
opened a general store at Philbrook, which he 
still conducts. He is also postmaster of the town, 
and a stanch Republican. 



Mr. Barney has the business instinct essential to 
the successful merchant. He knows what will 
strike the popular fancy and meet the general 
needs of his community. His store is a model of 
a country store in neatness and convenience, 
while the uniform and considerate politeness of 
the proprietor causes his chance customers to be- 
come regular patrons, and make his regular pa- 
trons his lasting friends. 



FRANK A. BARNES.— As one of the progres- 
sive young business men of Fergus county, 
where he is manager of the Gilt Edge Mercantile 
Company, in the thriving village of Gilt Edge, 
and as a member of the bar of the state, Mr. 
Barnes is well entitled to representation in this 
work. 

Mr. Barnes was born in Cedar county, Missouri, 
on the 8th of February, 1869, the son of Lewis 
M. and Adaline Barnes, both of whom were born 
in Missouri, where they still maintain their home, 
where the father is one of the influential farmers 
and stockgrowers of Cedar county. He is a 
Democrat in politics. During the Civil war he 
served in the Union army, as a member of the 
Second Kansas \^olunteer Cavalry, and was Col. 
Cloud's orderly. His wife is a member of the 
Christian church and both are folk of sterling 
worth of character. Of their six children Robert 
and Alta are deceased, the survivors being Frank 
A., Thomas G., Lila and Walter. 

Mr. F. A. Barnes received his early educa- 
tion in the pubhc schools and after an attendance 
of two years at Southwest Baptist College, at 
Bolivar, Mo., completed a course in the Central 
Normal College and Business Institute at Dan- 
ville, Ind. He began teaching at the age of seven- 
teen years and after teaching with marked success 
in the public schools of Missouri for five years 
he came to the northwest, in 1890, and located 
at Boise, Idaho, where he held a position in the 
public schools and engaged in reading law under 
Samuel H. Hayes, one of the leading members 
of the bar of that state. In December, 1892, 
Mr. Barnes came to Montana, locating in the 
vicinity of Maiden, Fergus county. He taught 
at intervals in the schools of this county until 1898, 
and continued his study of law. He was admitted 
to practice before the supreme court of Mon- 
tana, at Helena, in January, 1897, having been 
admitted to practice in the lower courts at Lewis- 



992 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



town, in the preceding year. Though he has not 
given his attention to legal work, he is a well 
equipped lawyer. 

In 1898 Air. Barnes became a bookkeeper in 
the large mercantile establishment of the Gilt Edge 
-Mercantile Company, at Gilt Edge, and in 1900 
was made manager of the extensive business. In 
politics Mr. Barnes gives unequivocal allegiance 
to the Democratic party. He has been raised 
to the master's degree in Freemasonry, and is 
affiliated with Western Star Lodge No. 26, A. 
F. & A. M., at Danville, Ind. He is also a mem- 
ber of Judith Lodge Xo. 30, at Lewistown, Mont., 
I. O. O. F. 

On the 30th of April, 1892, at Maiden, Mont., 
Mr. Barnes was united in marriage to Miss Daisy 
D. Dougherty, who was born in Randolph county. 
Mo., the daughter of James W. and Tucker V. 
Dougherty, both of whom were natives of Mis- 
souri. They came to Montana in 1887, locating 
in Lewistown, Fergus county. After some years 
Mr. Dougherty located on a ranch near Maiden, 
where he is engaged in farming and stockraising. 
He is also interested in neighboring mining prop- 
erties. He is a Democrat in politics and has 
passed the ancient-craft degrees in the Masonic 
fraternity. Mr. and Mrs. Dougherty have six 
children, namely: Daisy, Rice, Frank, Benjamin, 
Etheta and Hazel. Of the four children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Barnes, one, Ethel, died at the age of 
thirty months. The surviving children are Orville, 
Esther and Gladys. 



HENRY HEEB, originally a prominent pioneer 
miner of Montana, and at present proprietor 
of one of the finest and most extensive ranches 
in the far-famed Gallatin valley, was born in Bucks 
county. Pa., on November 8, 1835, the son of John 
(who was born in 1793) and Barbara (Ori) Heeb 
(born in 1802), natives of Lertenstein, Germany. 
They were married in the fatherland, came to the 
United States in 1832 and the father engaged in 
farming until his death in Pennsylvania. He died in 
1878 and the mother passed away in 1893. Henry 
Heeb, one of a family of two sons and two daugh- 
ters, passed his youth at and near the Pennsyl- 
vania homestead, and upon attaining his majority 
in 1856 removed to Leavenworth, Kan., where he 
remained until 1859. He was here during the 
eventful period incident to the John P.rown esca- 



pade, when rifle and pistol shots were of altogether 
too frequent occurrence, and the state was acquir- 
ing its sobriquet of Bleeding Kansas. In Penn- 
sylvania Mr. Heeb had learned both bricklaying 
and plastering, and these trades he followed with 
success in Leavenworth. During the Pike's Peak 
excitement of 1859 he joined the "stampede," and 
with a partner, Mr. Babcock, started with a large 
quantity of freight for the newly-discovered Colo- 
rado gold regions. Before they had proceeded far, 
however, the teams to the parties who owned the 
freight, returned to Leavenworth, and early the 
next spring made a second loading of four teams 
and took it through to the Peak where Mr.. Heeb 
engaged in working at his trades for two years, 
being fairly successful, much more so than in some 
mining operations he later conducted. 

In 1863 Mr. Heeb came to Montana, arriving 
in Virginia City in October. Here he engaged in 
freighting and in the winter of 1863-4 removed to 
the Gallatin valley, pre-empted a quarter section of 
land and in the summer of 1864 prospected with 
indifTerent success. Still it was then that he dis- 
covered the famous Pony lead, but owing to sub- 
sequent "consoHdation" he was frozen out of his 
interest in this valuable property. In the autumn 
of 1864 he went to Salt Lake City, Utah, and pur- 
chased seed for his farm, sowing it the following- 
spring. To his original claim Mr. Heeb has 
added until he now has an estate of over 1,400 
acres, thoroughly irrigated, on which he raises 
splendid crops of oats and barley. At one time 
he was extensively engaged in raising horses, hav- 
ing as many as 300 head, but lately he has confined 
his attention principally to diversified crops and 
cattle. To Miss Joanna Bellas, of Missouri, Mr. 
Heeb was married on April 23, 1878. She was the 
daughter of Equilla Bellas, of Ohio, who removed 
to Montana in 1862, residing at Bannack and also 
at Virginia City, where he was engaged in mining. 
He died in Butte in 1873, and his daughter, Mrs. 
Heeb, passed away in 1899. Mr. Heeb's five chil- 
dren by this union are : John, Frank, Barbara. 
Grace and Buell. The second marriage of Mr. 
Heeb occurred on September 21, 1899, when he 
was united to Mrs. Margaret Ault, of Virginia, 
daughter of Samuel Mofifatt. His family removed 
to Ohio from Virginia, and in 1 892 Mrs. Ault with 
her two children came to Montana. The famil\- 
are occupants of a beautiful modern residence, fin- 
ished throughout in hard wood, costing $7,000. and 
siuToundcd by commodious barns, granaries and 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



993 



other outbuildings.- Mr. Heeb is one of the lead- 
ing representative ranchmen of Gallatin county, 
and his integrity and sterling qualities have won 
public confidence and esteem. 



AR. BARROWS.— It is a remarkable fact that 
in the ranks of the men who laid broad and 
deep the foundations of Montana, were many of 
the ablest men of the east, those who had been 
prominent in the different relations of business, 
professfonal and political life. They were men of 
sterling integrity and moral rectitude. Out of the 
wealth of their experience in conducting matters 
of moment there, they had developed the best 
form of civilization for this new land. One of 
the earliest pioneers of Fergus county was a man 
of this character, whose memory is yet cherished 
with tender reverence by the best people of the 
section who knew him and the methods which 
he endeavord to impress upon the then infant 
community — Hon. A. R. Barrows, who was born 
at Olean, Cattaragus county, N. Y., July 30, 1838. 
His parents were of New England stock, coming 
down from the early days of the Connecticut and 
Plymouth colonies, and in the intelligent and prac- 
tical atmosphere engendered in those settlements 
he passed his youthful days. His father was one 
of the old-time pioneer lumbermen of the Alle- 
gany region, and for many years his home at Ran- 
dolph was the cheery public house of the village. 
Randolph possessed superior educational advan- 
tages in the way of a good academy, now Cham- 
berlain Institute, and here Mr. Barrows was edu- 
cated. He assisted his father in his lumbering 
business and therein acquired a practical education 
which he later turned to valuable account in the 
west. On one of their trips to Cincinnati on 
a raft, his father lost a leg, cut off by a rope with 
which he was endeavoring to fasten the raft to 
the shore. After this accident he closed out his 
business in New York and removed with his fam- 
ily to Olmstead county, Minn., locating at Pleas- 
ant Grove and engaged in farming and there 
he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives. 
Augustus accompanied them to their new home 
and followed various pursuits until the outbreak 
of the Civil war. During the progress of this he 
enlisted as a private in Company H, Eleventh 
^Minnesota \'olunteer Infantry, and on organization 
of the regiment was made orderly sergeant of 



his company. Possessing true military character- 
istics and great personal magnetism, he was idol- 
ized by his men, and was mustered out on June 
30, 1865, as a lieutenant. An incident showing 
his popularity deserves to be recorded. After the 
men received their discharges they formed a cir- 
cle around the captain and gave him three groans 
and hisses. They then surrounded Lieut. Barrows, 
lifted him on their shoulders, and carried him ofif 
the ground with cheers. 

On returning to civil life Mr. Barrows made his 
home in Chippewa county, Wis., and largely en- 
gaged in lumbermg, becoming one of the leaders 
of busmess life, commercial activity and political 
circles. Originally a Democrat, he heartily espoused 
Greenbackism, and became known as one of its ablest 
and most logical advocates in the state. He was 
twice elected county treasurer of Chippewa county, 
served one term with acceptability as mayor of 
Chippewa Falls, his home city, was elected a mem- 
ber of the legislature by a large majority, and when 
that body was organized on January 9, 1878, was 
chosen speaker of the assembly. Probably no per- 
son who ever filled that important office in the 
state gave such universal satisfaction as did 
Speaker Barrows. His fairness, his judicial abil- 
ity, his unfailing courtesy and his untiring kind- 
ness to the members won him the friendship even 
of his political opponents. He surprised his most 
sanguine friends by the able and impartial man- 
ner in which he discharged his duties. At the 
close of the session he was presented by his brother 
legislators with an elegant silver service of thir- 
teen pieces, the most expensive souvenir ever 
given to a speaker in that state. Later he led 
die forlorn hope of his party in his congressional 
district, but was defeated, as he expected to be. 
At that time the changed conditions of business 
life had much reduced his wealth by depreciating 
the value of the large amount of real estate he 
owned, and he determined to cast his lot with 
Montana. He thereupon organized a colony 
which he brought to Martindale in June, 1879. 
He then engaged in stockraising, having brought 
a • herd of blooded cattle with him. Soon after 
his arrival here, in company with E. P. Allis, of 
Milwaukee, one of the most complete sawmills 
ever built in this part of the state was erected, and 
they began the manufacture of lumber at Sawmill 
gulch, Meagher county. He soon became im- 
pressed with the natural location of his future 
home, Ubet, and there pre-empted 160 acres r)f 



994 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



land, the nucleus of his present large estate. This 
place he called Ubet from the first, and when, 
after erecting the large hotel building there, and 
removing thither in 1881 as one of the first perma- 
nent settlers of Judith basin, a postofifice was de- 
manded to accommodate the rapidly increasing 
number of settlers and at his request received the 
name of Ubet. At his new residence he en- 
gaged in stockraising, which he successfully con- 
ducted until his death, and no man was better 
known in Judith basin or took greater interest 
in its development. He was not long spared to 
aid in this great work, for he was called away by 
death on December 20, 1885. He was buried at Chip- 
pewa Falls, Wis., under the auspices of the Masonic 
fraternity in which he was a Knight- Templar. 

Mr. Barrows was united in marriage at Pleasant 
Grove, Minn., November 16, 1862, with Miss Alice 
B. Duncan, who was a most valuable helpmate 
to him all the years of their wedded life, and since 
his death has demonstrated great business ability. 
She was left with a family of young children, but 
with motherly devotion she raised them to ma- 
ture years and gave each of them a good educa- 
tion. She has, also, with the aid of her children, 
increased the original homestead to an estate of 
2,000 acres. She has always kept a hotel, the 
e-xcellent reputation of which is known far and 
near. Her great heart causes her everywhere to 
relieve suffering, and she never turns a wayfarer 
from her door unassisted. An incipient city has 
been developed at Ubet on Mrs. Barrows' land. 
She recently donated a site of twenty acres for a 
Methodist parsonage, and in many ways her gen- 
erosity and public spirit have been shown. She 
is one of the valued residents of Fergus county, 
and her memory, like her husband's, will be cher- 
ished long after she will have passed away as 
one of the true pioneer women of Montana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Barrows were the parents of four children : 
John R., now a prosperous lawyer of San Diego, 
Cal. ; Mary, who died at two years of age ; Olive, 
,now Mrs. Oscar L. Lockwood, of Ubet, and 
Clarence H., who, after faithful service in the 
Philippines as a member of Company I, First Mon- 
tana Infantry, is now residing at Ubet. 



DUDLEY C. BASS.— William E. and Dudley 
C. Bass, of Ravalli county, familiarly known 
over the United States and Canada as the Bass 
Brothers, were among the first to demonstrate 



that their section of Montana is well adapted to 
fruit raising and thereby established a new in- 
dustry among its people. Their enterprise, re- 
nowned even in the east as the Pine Grove fruit 
farm, has grown from a small beginning in 1871, 
regarded by most people with great distrust and 
by many with ridicule, to gigantic proportions, 
and includes 100 acres of land in fruit bearing trees 
and the shipment of 10,000 boxes of apples and 
1,500 of smaller fruits and berries every year, to 
all parts of the northern United States and lower 
Canadian provinces, as well as New York and 
other Atlantic coast cities. They have built up 
also on a scale of great magnitude an immense busi- 
ness in raising and selling garden vegetables, many 
of them enormous in size yet lacking neither 
fineness of fibre nor delicacy of flavor. It is not 
uncommon for them to produce a cabbage weigh- 
ing forty pounds. Moreover, having nearly 1,000 
acres of land in their ranch and being men of 
that systematic enterprise which utilizes every ele- 
ment of profit, they raise numbers of fine grade 
Durham cattle, Norman-Percheron horses and 
choice breeds of sheep. Their place is beautifully 
situated and is well improved with all the nec- 
essary buildings in addition to a comfortable resi- 
dence, which is embowered by a natural grove 
and trees of their own planting. The ranch is 
spread out charmingly at the side of the Bitter 
Root mountains and surrounded by the fine groves 
of pine from which it derives its name. 

This new departure has resulted in an out- 
come so gratifying and so far surpassing expec- 
tation that it must be interesting to look briefly 
into the history of its proprietors for the grounds 
of the inspiration and faith by which they worked 
and were upheld. Their ancestors were among 
those sturdy English emigrants who first settled 
Vermont and New York, their father, William 
B. Bass, being a native of the latter state, where 
he was born in 181 1. Their mother was Ruth 
(Childs) Bass, a native of Clarendon Springs, Vt., 
wliere her son, Dudley C. Bass, was born on August 
10, 1842. After their marriage his parents resided 
thirteen years at Glens Falls, N. Y. In 1855 they 
removed to Chicago, and in 1858 to Jefferson 
City, Mo., where Mrs. Bass died in 1861, leav- 
ing three sons and one daughter, and ten years 
later the father joined his sons in Montana. Dud- 
Icy C. Bass was thirteen years old when his par- 
ents came west, and consequently attained man- 
hood in Chicago and Jef?erson City. After coming 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



995 



to his majority, he became interested with his 
older brother, William E., in the hotel business, 
first at Sedalia and later at Clinton. In 1864 they 
crossed the plains with mule teams to Alder gulch, 
Alont., and followed there mining for a time, but 
not achieving the desired success, they decided to 
turn their attention to agricultural pursuits. They 
then located on a portion of their present ranch 
and began raising hay, grain and vegetables, for 
wliich they found ready sale at excellent prices i'l 
the mining camps. But they conceived the idea 
that they could do well with fruit, and boldly 
entered upon the experiment, majcing their first 
planting of trees in 1871. The results have proven 
the soundness of their judgment. While wait- 
ing for their trees to reach the bearing age, they 
continued their farming operations and engaged 
from time to time in other enterprises, such as 
saw and flouring mills, building railroads, furnish- 
ing ties under contract and various others. 

From the inception of the fruit industry, Dud- 
ley C. Bass has been its manager and active pro- 
moter, and is now (1901) its sole owner, hav- 
ing purchased a few years ago his brother's in- 
terest, although the ranch is still conducted m 
their joint name. In 1874 he was married to Miss 
Etta Emmett, daughter of L. S. and Eva Em- 
mett, of Windsor, Mo., and sister of Jennie, the 
wife of his brother, William E., since 1862. One 
child has blessed their union, Lee Emmett, aged 
thirteen. In politics Mr. Bass is an unwavering- 
Democrat, except in local matters, where he places 
the interest of the community above the claims of 
party. He manifests a keen and intelligent inter- 
est in public matters and gives his aid cheer- 
fully to the success of the principles in which he 
believes. In business it has been amply demon- 
strated that he is a progressive, nervy, resourceful 
and far-seeing man. In social life he has the at- 
tributes which make up a charming personality. 
He is an intelligent talker, an appreciative lis- 
tener, a genial companion and a generous host. 



ROBERT A. BAXTER.— Five miles northwest 
of the attractive city of Bozeman is located 
the fine ranch property of Mr. Baxter, one of the 
pioneers and popular citizens of Gallatin county, 
who has accumulated a fine property and attained 
a position as one of the substantial farmers and 
business men of Montana, where he has resided 



for more than a quarter of a century. Mr. Baxter 
was born in County Donegal, Ireland, April 28, 
1836, the son of George and Sarah (Anderson) 
Baxter, both of whom were born in the same 
county, as was also Robert Baxter, his paternal 
grandfather. When Robert A. was about twelve 
years of age his parents immigrated to America, 
locating in Ontario, Canada, where his father was 
a farmer until his death. 

The education received in the schools of Ire- 
land by Robert A. Baxter was supplemented in 
the excellent schools of Ontario, and he aided 
in the work of the homestead farm until 1865, 
when he started for San Francisco, making the 
voyage by the Panama route and duly reaching 
his destination. He remained in San Francisco for 
some time and thereafter was engaged in suc- 
cessful agriculture in various sections of Cali- 
fornia. Five years later Mr. Baxter visited his 
parents in Canada for two months, then came 
westward to Montana. He traveled on the Union 
Pacific Railroad as far as Corinne, Utah, and then 
came by stage to the Gallatin valley, where he 
])re-empted a claim of 160 acres, which is a part 
of his present estate. He has ad'ded to his original 
claim until he now has a ranch of 400 acres, and 
the entire tract is practically supplied with most 
efifective facilities for irrigation. Here Mr. Bax- 
ter has devoted his attention to the raising of large 
crops of wheat, oats, barley and hay, while he 
has made valuable improvements, including a com- 
modious and attractive residence, good barns and 
other outbuildings. He is one of the leading 
farmers of the county, and his genial personality 
and inflexible integrity have gained for him the 
friendship of the people. 

His word is as good as any bond, and a sig- 
nal recognition of this fact is that he has been 
for a number of years treasurer of the Farmers' 
Canal Company, and there has been no thought 
of asking him for bond or other security. Mr. 
Baxter is a stockholder in and a director of the 
Commercial Bank of Bozeman and a trustee of 
the Bozeman Milling Company. Fie is Democratic 
in politics, but is independent in his views and 
actions. He is a school trustee and gives his 
aid to all worthy enterprises for the good of the 
community. 

On February 16, 1880, Mr. Baxter married Miss 
Mary A. L. James, born in Prince Edward county, 
Ontario, Canada, May 12, 1850, the daughter of 
John and Margaret James, who were born in Ire- 



'J96 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



land and became influential farmers of Ontario. 
Of the three children of Mr. and Mrs. Baxter, 
two are deceased : Sarah Alberta died at the 
age of seven years ; Robert George, a graduate of 
the Bozeman high school and known as a young 
man of distinctive promise, was born May 19, 
1882, and is still beneath the parental roof, while 
Clarence I. died at the age of ten years. 



pHARLES A. BECKSTROM is one who has 
V_^ made a success of the business of cattle ranch- 
ing and general farming in Cascade county on 
a fine piece of property near Kibbey. He was 
born in Sweden, May 2, 1868, and is still a young, 
energetic and progressive man. His parents were 
Gustavus and Mary Beckstrom, natives of Sweden, 
and his father followed agricultural pursuits in 
the old country with fair success. They were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. 

Charles A. Beckstrom was taken from the pub- 
lic schools of his native country at the age of 
fourteen years and began to make his own living 
at the trade of a carpenter, his wages being $1.50 
per day. In this line of employment he continued 
five years, and was industrious and frugal. In- 
spired by an ambition to bet,ter his condition he 
came to the United States in 1887. At that period 
Great Falls was beginning to emerge from the 
obscurity of the wilderness, and to this new city 
in Montana Mr. Beckstrom directed his footsteps 
in search of employment. This he secured in the 
line of railroad work, up to 1894, when he engaged 
in ranching and stockraising at Kibbey. He has 
succeeded beyond his most sanguine expectations, 
being the possessor of 640 acres of land and a 
herd of 100 cattle. His principal crops are oats 
and hay, which prove quite an additional source 
of income. Politically Mr. Beckstrom is in har- 
mony with the principles of the Republican party. 



WILLIAM H. BELL.— In Knox county. Hid., 
which borders on the famous Wabash, the 
theme of song and story, William H. Bell first 
saw the light of day, on March 9, 1843. His 
parents, Charles and Lydia (Bartley) Bell, were 
also natives of the Hoosier state and had six chil- 
dren, William being the third. He attended the 
country school near Oaktown until he was about 



eighteen years, and then worked on the farm for 
five years. In 1866 he removed to Kansas, and 
was employed by the United States government 
under contract as butcher and supply man, and 
did freighting for three years. Returned to In- 
diana, he worked on the old homestead until 
1874, then farmed for himself a number of years, 
and afterward conducted a meat business at Oak- 
town and Carlisle in the adjoining county until 
1888. In that year he came to Montana, and, 
after spending a few months at Grantsdale, he 
and his sisters, Mary E. Bell and Mrs. Harriet 
Jordan, each took up 160 acres of land, 320 of 
it lying about two miles west of Hamilton and the 
other quarter lying across the river west of the 
town. Here they have a beautiful stone residence 
where they live together and raise abundant crops 
of grain, hay and fruit, along with numbers of 
superior stock. The business conducted on the 
ranch is prosperous and successful, and with such 
an estate as they possess, such evidences of thrift 
around them, and so much that is interesting and 
entertaining in the home life, their lot is blessed 
beyond that of most people, but does not exceed 
in good elements their fair and just deserts for the 
good they do and the example they give. In 
politics Mr. Bell is an ardent Democrat and in fra- 
ternal relations is identified with the Masonic 
order. He was married on April 19, 1874, to Miss 
Elizabeth Charley, at Oaktown, Ind., the home 
of her parents. They have two children, Mel- 
vina and Jessie. 



HERMAN E. BENNER, who holds the im- 
portant office of sherifif of Cascade county 
and who is a well known citizen of Great Falls, 
has proved that earnest endeavor and integrity of 
purpose will win a due reward. He has earned his 
own living since the early age of eight years, and 
it is not often that we find thus early the incep- 
tion of a selfmade man. Herman Ellsworth Ben- 
ner is a native of Ellsworth, Hancock county, 
Me., where he was born on August 18, 1866, the 
son of Hiram F. and Jane (Boynton) Benner,. 
both of whom were also born in Maine. His 
father, a millwright and sawfiler, died at Still- 
water, Minn., in 1894, and his widow now makes 
her home with her daughter, Mrs. Bertha Mcin- 
tosh, of Stillwater. One son resides in St. Paul, 
Minn., two others at Shell Lake, Wis., one at 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



997 



Great Falls, Mont., where the other daughter, Nel- 
lie, Mrs. Wm. F. Brown, also lives. 

Mr. Benner received his education at Stillwater, 
Minn., whither his parents removed when he was 
a child, and here he graduated in the high school 
in the class of 1886. During his school days he 
occupied his vacations as a sawfiler in the lum- 
ber mills of Minnesota and Wisconsin, and on 
leaving school he continued the same occupation 
until 1892, within which period, however, he had 
taught school two winters in Stillwater. In the 
fall of 1892 he came to Great Falls, where he be- 
came connected with the Great Falls iron works, 
and after two years he became manager of the 
company's store at Belt, a year. Returning to 
Great Falls, he worked a year for the Great Falls 
Hardware Company, and then became a traveling 
salesman for the Marshall-Wells Hardware Com- 
pany, of Duluth, Minn., resigning this position in 
six months, after which he returned to Great 
Falls. In 1896 he again took a position with the 
Great Falls Iron Works, and at the end of two 
months was promoted from the repair shop to head 
bookkeeper, in which position he served six 
months, when he was elected treasurer of the 
company and a member of its directorate. This 
incumbency he retained two years, until 1900, when 
he was elected sheriff on the Democratic ticket, 
having the distinction of being the first Demo- 
cratic sheriflf elected in the county, which attests 
his popularity. He is also a valued member of 
Kenbrae Castle No. 201, R. H. In 1890 Mr. 
Benner was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet Hanks, of Albany, 111., daughter of D. C. 
Hanks, one of the oldest steamboat pilots on the 
Mississippi, and who was pilot and captain on 
J government boat during the Civil war There 
are two children in the family, Kathryn and Grey. 



1J^ C. BERENDES, cashier and manager of the 
Bank of Boulder, first came to Montana in 
1879, locating at Jefferson City. Since his arrival 
in the state he has led an active business and 
political life, achieving a success which is as well 
merited as it is pronounced. In all state, munici- 
pal and financial affairs he has ever taken a lively 
interest and his high social qualities are recog- 
nized by a host of warm personal friends. F. C. 
Berendes was born in Niles, Berrien countv, Mich., 



on November 17, 1861. His parents were Frank 
and Jeannette (Dell) Berendes, natives of Ger- 
many. In early life they emigrated to Michigan 
and were married at Niles, residing there until 
their death in 1872. They had three sons and three 
daughters, of whom two sons and two daughters 
are now living. The maternal grandfather was 
head forester near Berlin for the German gov- 
ernment. After his death his widow and children 
came to the United States. 

Mr. Berendes was reared and educated in Niles 
and in Milwaukee, Wis. He began business life as 
a clerk in Niles, where he resided with the ex- 
ception of the time he attended school in Mil- 
waukee until 1879. He then became imbued with 
the spirit of western enterprise and came to this 
state, first locating, as has been noted, at Jefifer- 
son City. Here he was employed by J. G. Sand- 
ers as a clerk and later he was with T. A. Wickes, 
at Wickes, Mont., with whom he remained until 
1882. In that year the firm of Ellis & Berendes 
was formed and our enterprising and industrious 
young man was fairly launched in business and 
rapidly achieving the success due the judiciously 
ambitious. In 1884, however, Mr. Berendes had 
been elected county treasurer of Jefferson county, 
He served two terms of two years each, the firm of 
Ellis & Berendes ceasing to exist, and in 1888, 
with W. B. Gafifney and Daniel McNiell, he or- 
ganized the Bank of Jefiferson County and was 
made its cashier. The original capital stock was 
$30,000. In 1891 the name was changed to the 
First National Bank and in 1893 to the Bank of 
Boulder, since which time Mr. Berendes has had 
control of the bank. He is also a partner in the 
Gafifney Mercantile Company. In 1886 he was 
united in marriage to Miss Annie Sloan, a native 
of Montana, and they have one child, Gladys. 
Politically Mr. Berendes has affiliated with the 
Democratic party, in whose various campaigns 
he has ever taken a lively interest and a leading 
part. He is also a Freemason, a member of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Odd Fel- 
lows and the Woodmen of the World. Since 
coming to Montana Mr. Berendes has formed an 
extensive business and political acquaintance 
throughout the state and is recognized as a man 
of the utmost probity and stability of character. 
All of his various enterprises have met with un- 
qualified success, showing that his financial abil- 
ity is of a high order, while in social life he is 
popular, possessing the heartiest esteem of all. 



998 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



SAMUEL BESSETTE.— Prominent among the 
leading stockmen and ranchers of the Dear- 
born district of Lewis and Clarke county, Mont., 
is Samuel Bessette, a Canadian by birth, a New 
England Yankee by long association and edu- 
cation, but now an enterprising westerner and a 
warm friend of Montana. He was born at St. 
John, P. Q., Canada, on February 28, 1849, the 
son of Leon and Masaline Bessette, Canadian 
farmers, but who lead a retired life in New Bed- 
ford, Mass., to which they removed in 1890. They 
are both Catholics, and the father is a Demo- 
crat. Samuel Bessette enjoyed but few advan- 
tages of schooling, for at the age of nine he be- 
gan to assist his parents and at sixteen he began 
work in the cotton mills for $1.00 per day, which 
was later increased to $2.00. He was thus em- 
ployed for eighteen years in New Bedford, whither 
his family had come when Samuel was but six- 
teen years old. Mr. Bessette came to Montana 
in 1884. Locating at Helena he secured employ- 
ment with Nicholas Kessler, for three years, his 
wages at first being $35 per month and afterward 

$45- 

But he had long determined to work for himself, 
and in 1887 he took up homestead and desert claims 
to the amount of 320 acres, and to this added 640 
acres of pasturage land. This tract is located 
twelve miles northwest of Wolf creek, on the 
south fork of Dearborn river, in Lewis and Clarke 
county. Here he carries on quite an extensive 
business in ranching and cattleraising. The 
family of Mr. Bessette is surrounded by all the 
comforts of home, and around him is every con- 
venience necessary for the successful conduct of 
his enterprise. Mr. Bessette was married on Jan- 
uary II, 1870, in New Bedford, Mass., to Miss Me- 
linda J. Loiseau. She was born at Bel Oiel, P. O., 
Canada, on September 28, 1850. She is the daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Celina Loiseau, Canadians. Her 
father was once extensively interested in tanning, 
but of late years he has been a hotel keeper. Both 
her parents are Catholics. Mr. and Mrs. Bes- 
sette have had six children, but four of them are 
dead, two dying in infancy. The survivors are 
Arthur A., born at Taunton, Alass., on May 14, 
1882, and William W., born at Iberville, P. O., 
Canada, on November 16, 1884. The parents 
are members of the Catholic church. Politically 
Mr. Bessette holds with the Democratic party and 
he votes its ticket upon all national issues, but 
in local questions he does not think it incumbent 



upon him to always cast a straight ticket. In the 
community in which he resides Mr. Bessette is rec- 
ognized as a man of sound judgment and excellent 
principles. In the fall of 1900 Mr. and Mrs. Bes- 
sette made a visit to their parents and friends in 
the east, going to New Bedford and Taunton, 
Mass., then to Montreal and Chambly, P. Q., 
Canada, where Mrs. Bessette's parents are living. 
They had a pleasant trip of three months, but 
were glad to get back to Montana. 



T EROME H. BETTS is one of the fortunate 
J and prosperous ranchmen of Cascade county, 
Mont., located near Stockett. He was born in 
Blue Earth county, Minn., on July 2, 1869, a son 
of William H. Betts, further mention of whom 
follows this sketch. He was reared in his native 
county until he was six years of age. In 1875 
the family removed to Missouri, and in 1877 came 
back to Minnesota and located in Stearns county. 
Here they remained eleven years, during which 
time Jerome attended school and assisted his 
father on the farm. They then came to Montana, 
settling seven miles south of Stockett. In 1891 
Mr. Betts, then being twenty-two years old, took 
up a pre-emption claim and homesteaded 160 acres. 
He cultivates seventy acres and has forty head of 
cattle and fifteen horses. In x\pril, 1893, he was 
married to Miss Louisa Hirt, of Lansmg, Iowa, 
daughter of Henry and Louisa (Holscher) Hirt, 
natives of Germany. Her mother died June 14, 
1900, at the Columbus Hospital in Great Falls, at 
the age of seventy-two. Her father died at Lan- 
sing, Iowa, aged seventy years. Of the three 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Betts one, John Henry, 
is dead and the others are Raymond Joseph and 
Glenn J. Jerome is an expert engineer by trade. 
In 1891 he and his father engaged in threshing 
with good success. They have a sawmill in con- 
nection with their stock industry, and in both lines 
of enterprise are doing well. 



WILLIAM H. BETTS came to Montana in 
1888, and located seven miles south of 
Stockett, Cascade county, where he now has a 
fine ranch well provided with cattle and all the 
conveniences for successful operations in this line 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



of industry. He was born at Caanan, N. Y., on 
February 12, 1842. He is the son of James and 
Mary (Carr) Betts. The father was a cabinet- 
maker and died in June, 1848. His wife survived 
him many years, dying some years since at about 
the venerable age of seventy-five. William H. 
Betts left New York when a child of three years 
and went to Berkshire county, Mass., where, when 
he grew older, he worked on farms in the sum- 
mer and attended public school in the winter. 
In 1856 he came to Winnebago county, Wis., 
where he continued farming for wages until 1861. 
On August 20 of that year Mr. Betts enlisted in 
Company D, First Wisconsin Cavalry, and served 
until November 13, 1862, when he was honorably 
discharged at Madison, Wis. His service was 
in Missouri, commencing at Cape Girardeau and 
consisting mostly of raids after guerrillas and bush- 
whackers. After his discharge, in 1863, he re- 
moved to Blue Earth county, Minn., where, for 
the first time, he went into the business of general 
farming on his own account. Here he raised cat- 
tle and other stock, but in 1875 removed to Atch- 
ison county, Mo., and here continued farming un- 
til 1878. Thence he returned to Minnesota and 
settled in Stearns county, where he remained ten 
years. 

In 1888 Mr. Betts came to Stockett, and took 
up pre-emption and tree claims as a part of his 
present ranch. Here he has since continued suc- 
cessfully in cattle raising, and has about sixty 
acres of this land under cultivation. In 1898 he 
purchased another 160 acres, making him a line 
ranch of 320 acres, on which he has fine herds 
of cattle and horses. On June 25, 1868, Mr. Betts 
was married to Miss Emeretta Gates, of Elington, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., daughter of Joel and 
Emeline Gates. Joel Gates, born in Vermont, was 
long a member of the mercantile house of Gates 
& Wheeler, of Elington, and a man of import- 
ance in the county. He died on March 18, 1899, 
in Blue Earth county, Minn., where he had been 
a resident from 1863. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Merchant, is now a resident of Blue 
Earth county. Her daughter, Mrs. Ader E. Fos- 
ter, is caring for her in her declining years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Betts had one daughter, Luella, 
who died. Their surviving children are Jerome 
H. Betts, Bernice I. (Mrs. John G. Abbott, of 
Spokane, \A'ash.), Leonard E., Darrow L., Flora 
B. and Elnora E. In the community in which he 
resides Mr. Betts is highly respected. 



p EORGE W. BRADLEY.— Having been born 
vJ on January 31, 1871, in Tama county, Iowa, 
on this side of the Mississippi, the subject of this 
review is distinctively a product of the west. His 
parents are William and Augusta (Parkins) Brad- 
ley, both natives of Ohio, where the former was 
born in 1845 ^nd the latter in 1854. They are now 
living in PhilHps county, Kan. The father re- 
moved with his parents, when a boy, to Tama 
county, Iowa, and after living there twenty-five 
years, made his home in Guthrie county, in the 
same state, where he was successfully engaged 
in farming for seven years. He then removed to 
Smith county, Kan., and later to his present home 
in Phillips county. 

George Bradley was educated in the public 
schools of Iowa and Kansas, remaining with his 
parents until he was eighteen years of age. Then, 
after working two years as a farm hand in Iowa 
and Minnesota, in 1891 he came to Montana, lo- 
cating in the Rosebud valley and accepting em- 
ployment on the ranch of Messrs. Hubbard & 
Thompson, with whom he remained seven years. 
In the meantime, in the year 1894, he bought the 
improvements on a homestead claiin, which is now 
a part of his home ranch that consists of 320 
acres of good land and an open range, and is 
devoted to cattle, hay and general farming. 

In politics Mr. Bradley is a Republican, but 
cannot be called an active partisan. He was mar- 
ried at Miles City in 1901, to Miss Hattie Mil- 
ler, who was born in Iowa in 1880, and was 
reared and educated in the beautiful Rosebud val- 
ley which is now her home. 



HENRY NELSON BLACK.— In all ages the 
great builders have been renowned among 
men and considered deserving of the highest hon- 
ors. And those who are engaged in beautifying 
our cities with imposing and convenient churches, 
schools and public buildings, hotels, halls and pri- 
vate residences, are also entitled to rank among 
the benefactors of mankind and be held worthy 
of general approbation and esteem. To this class 
of pubHc benefactors belongs Henry Nelson Black, 
doing business as an architect with offices at Great 
Falls and Anaconda, Mont. He has had a singu- 
larly varied and busy professional career, the pro'.l- 
ucts of his fertile brain standing forth in many 
cities as graceful, or elegant, or massive monu- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



ments to his taste, skill, inventive genius and pro- 
fessional attainments. He was born at Maiden, 
Mass., on August i, 1854. His father, Simon 
Black, a master mechanic, and his mother, Martha 
(Waite) Black, were also natives of the Bay state, 
descendants of Revolutionary soldiers, the pater- 
nal grandfather of Mr. Black being a Maj. Black 
who won distinction for gallantry under command 
of Lafayette. 

Mr. Black, the youngest of four children, was 
reared and educated with much care. He went 
through all the grades of the schools of his native 
town and the Boston Latin School, then took a 
thorough course in the Boston School of Tech- 
nology, from which he was graduated in 1872, 
having chosen this technical school rather than 
Harvard, for which he had fitted himself, for the 
purpose of securing special instruction in his pro- 
fession. After his graduation he accepted a posi- 
tion as foreman of the architectural department 
in the office of Bryant & Rogers, extensive de- 
signers and builders of Boston, and remained with 
them five years. He then went to Philadelphia 
as assistant to a leading architect, but remained 
there only one year, when he returned to Boston 
and set up in business for himself in partner- 
ship with his former employer, Mr. Bryant. They 
opened an office in St. John, N. B., of which Mr. 
Black took charge. After about a year and a 
half of successful operation, the partnership was 
dissolved, and Mr. Black went to Fredericton, 
N. B., in service of the attorney-genera! of tlie 
province, and also built churches, dwellings and 
other edifices. From there he went to Wood- 
stock and practically rebuilt the town after its 
destruction by fire. He did the same for East- 
port, Me., after its great fire, designing banks, 
the Masonic Temple and all other public and 
private buildings in that city and doing valuable 
engineering work for the city. 

Mr. Black removed from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific coast in 7890, locating at Fairhaven in 
Washington, and immediately upon his arrival 
was employed by the townsite company. In 1895 
he came to Montana as one of the competitors 
for constructing new state capitol, and located at 
Anaconda, afterwards opening an additional office 
at Great Falls. In Anaconda he has built several 
schoolhouses, many business blocks, a Methodist 
Episcopal church and a number of private dwell- 
ings. He also remodeled the city hall, and erected 
an annex to the State Insane Asylum. In Great 



Falls he is at present the constructing architect 
of the new Methodist Episcopal church and also 
of the new Cascade county court house, which is to 
cost not less than a quarter of a million of dol- 
lars. From year to year and from place to place 
Mr. Black's reputation as a scholarly, conscien- 
tious and progressive architect has augmented, un- 
til he is now, perhaps, one of the best known and 
most eminent artisans of his craft in this section 
of the country. In addition to his special and tech- 
nical knowledge he has extensive general informa- 
tion and knowledge of the world, a rich fund of 
reminiscence, a ready wit and a genial manner, 
which make him a most agreeable companion, and 
a sincere, honest, hearty manhood, which consti- 
tutes him an excellent citizen. 



MJ. HEALY.— The subject of this sketch be- 
longs to one of the pioneer families of Mon- 
tana, and one that has for many years been 
prominent in the political and commercial affairs 
of the state. He was born in County Cork, Ire- 
land, March i, i860. His parents were also na- 
tives of Ireland, who immigrated to the United 
states in 1873, locating at Sun River. The father 
was William Healy, who died at his adopted home 
in 1892. The mother, nee Mary Collins, is still 
living at Sun River. 

Mr. Healy received his education in the public 
schools of Sun River and Helena, Mont., and after 
leaving school, at the age of eighteen, he entered 
the employ of the Diamond R Freighting Com- 
pany, in whose service he spent ten years en- 
gineering mule teams over the vast territory cov- 
ered by the company's operations before railroads 
came into this section. In the meantime he also en- 
gaged in the cattle business on the ranges, begin- 
ning in 1881 ; and on leaving the service of the 
company in 1890, took up a 500-acre ranch on 
Beaver creek, two and a half miles from Havre. 
On this he has been extensively engaged in stock- 
raising and farming since that date, and has met 
with gratifying success in his venture. 

In politics Mr. Healy is an ardent and active 
Republican. He has been potential in the service 
of his party, and has been called upon to serve his 
people in various official stations. In 1884 he was 
made under sherifif, by his uncle, Capt. John J. 
Healy, then sheriff of old Choteau county, and was 
stationed at Great Falls for a year. He was re- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



appointed to this position in 1886 by Sheriff Mc- 
Devitt, and again in 1889 by Sheriff O'Neill. In 
1892 he was Chinese inspector for Havre district ; 
in 1898 was game and fish warden for Choteaii 
county, and since the spring of 1900 has been in- 
spector of customs for Montana and Idaho, with 
headquarters at Havre. He is a member of Havre 
Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, to which 
he gives active attention and in which he finds 
much profitable enjoyment. In 1884, at Sun 
River, he was married to Miss Mary Healy. They 
"have four children, namely : Michael J., Ligoura, 
Nora and John G. Both Mr. and Mrs. Healy have 
hosts of friends in their community and are highly 
esteemed wherever thev are known. 



U r ILLIAM C. BLANCHARD.— The son of 
VV distinguished ancestry on both sides of his 
house, and who gave prominent service to their 
country in every phase of its history, and inher- 
iting from them. the characteristics of sterling man- 
hood and useful citizenship, William C. Blanchard 
Tvorthily preserves the traditions and standing of 
his line and illustrates in himself its best fea- 
tures. He was born at Council Bluffs, Iowa, 
June 18, 1848, the son of John R. and Margaret 
(Cook) Blanchard, the former a native of Boston 
and the latter of Lancaster county, Pa. The 
Blanchards came to z^merica in the seventeenth 
■century, and have been closely identified with 
American history since their arrival. Mr. Blanch- 
ard's grandfather, John R. Blanchard, was a sol- 
dier in the Colonial army, and took part in the 
battles of Bunker Hill, Lexington and others of 
that period. His maternal grandfather, Stephen 
Cook, was also a gallant soldier in that struggle, 
and fought at Brandywine and other battles. The 
father, John R. Blanchard, was on the Consti- 
tution in the war of 1812, under Commodore 
Bainbridge. Later he took part in the contest 
with the Algerines, and in 1836 came west to 
Nauvoo, 111., and when the Mormons were driven 
out of that state he kept on west to the Missouri 
river, on which he located about four miles north 
-of Omaha, where he remained four years, conduct- 
ing a ferry across the river. In 1852 he went 
to Salt Lake City, locating in Farmington, Utah, 
where he remained until his death in 1881 at the 
age of eighty-nine. 

William Blanchard remained at home until 1874, 



when he removed to Cache county, Utah, where 
he passed four years engaged in raising stock with 
his brother, J. R. Blanchard, Jr., who had a large 
stock range. At the end of that time he removed 
to Bear Lake county, Idaho, and conducted a 
harness store in MontpeHer until 1889, when he 
removed to Uinta county, Wyo. In 1894 he came 
to Montana and located his present home about 
seven miles south of Bridger, and has since engaged 
in raising stock, fruit and general farm prod- 
ucts. He is an industrious and progressive man, 
with good business capacity and excellent taste 
in arranging his place, which shows evidence of hi? 
skill and enterprise. 

On October 12, 1867, Mr. Blanchard was united 
in marriage with Miss Jerusha C. Walker, a 
daughter of Lorin and Lavina (Smith) Walker, 
the former a native of Vermont and the latter 
of New York. Mrs. Blanchard's mother, Lavina 
Smith, was the oldest child of Hiram Smith, a 
brother of Joseph Smith, the founder of the Mormon 
church. The Blanchards have ten children : Will- 
iam Perry, living in Idaho; Margaret Cook, now 
Mrs. Campbell, of Wyoming; Lavina Irene, now 
Mrs. Lee, of Golden, Carbon county, Mont.; 
Bertha Isabel, now Mrs. Kennington, of Wyom- 
ing ; Helen Jerusha, now Mrs. McBride, of Golden, 
Mont. ; Hiram Frank, Don Carlos, Gilbert Leroy, 
Jesse L. and Clarence Eugene, all living at home. 



HOWARD A. BICKFORD is a native of Pe- 
nobscot county. Me., where he was born 
August 14, 1854. His father, Jabez, and his 
mother, Anna Dollif, were also natives of Maine, 
and passed their lives in that state, the father, 
who was a successful farmer and lumberman, 
dying in 1886, and the mother in 1876. Mr. Bick- 
ford began his education in the public schools of 
Bangor and finished it in those of Oshkosh, Wis. 
In 1873 he removed to Minnesota, and worked in 
the pine lumber woods about four years. In 1877 
he went to Bismarck, N. D., and joined a govern- 
ment expedition as driver of an ambulance team 
during the Nez Perces raid. After eight months 
of this service he spent the winter of 1881 hunt- 
ins: buffalo along the Yellowstone and its tribu^ 
taries, and during the same year took up a squat- 
ter's claim on Fox creek, in the most fertile part 
of the Yellowstone valley, where he has since 
continued to reside and now has a beautiful ranch 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



and an elegant home. Here he devotes his attention 
to raising- thoroughbred Hereford cattle and a high 
grade of horses, and through them has been in- 
strumental in materially raising the standard of 
the stock in his neighborhood. 

In politics Mr. Bickford has been always an act- 
ive and zealous Republican, and has been fruitful 
in good service to his party, having been a mem- 
ber of its county central committee during the 
last six years and doing faithful work in all its 
campaigns. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a mem- 
ber of Lone Tree Lodge No. 63, at Sidney. In 
1884 he was united in marriage with Miss Barbara 
Stewart, a native of Ontario, Canada, where she 
was born April 26, 1865. The marriage occurred 
at Newlon, Mont. Mr. and Mrs. Bickford have 
three children, namely: Randall, aged sixteen; 
Eva, seven, and Marion, five. Mr. Bickford is a 
very progressive and enterprising man, with 
breadth of view and skill in his business, has an 
earnest desire for the advancement of his neigh- 
borhood and state along every good line of im- 
provement. He is of a genial and obliging dis- 
position, with a wide range of general information 
gathered by varied experience and an intelligent 
observation of men and events. He is highly es- 
teemed wherever he is known, and looked upon 
at home as one of the most useful and represent- 
ative citizens of the con^munitv. 



JOHN W. BLYTH has lived to fully realize 
J the vast difference between conditions in Can- 
ada at an early day and the present prosperity 
that he enjoys in Cascade county, Mont. His 
handsome property is located on Otter creek, 
eight miles southeast of Armington. He is a 
native of Canada, born July 22, 1856. Flis parents 
were Alexander and Rachel Blyth, natives of Scot- 
land. Up to the age of twenty-two years the 
father was a linen weaver; he then followed the 
charcoal business, combined with farming. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church ; the 
mother was a Methodist. Four children survive 
them : John W., Thomas, George and Margaret J. 
John \V. Blyth received but a limited education. 
At the age of eight years he was compelled to 
blow the bellows in a blacksmith shop for the 
extremely low wages of $1.50 per month. .A.t this 



business he continued eighteen months and then 
engaged in farm work for the same munificent 
salary and continued it nearly two years. Subse- 
quently his wages were raised to $4.00 per month, 
and he then began to think he could save some 
money. At the end of eighteen months' service 
he went to Lawton, Mich., where he secured em- 
ployment in cutting wood, hauling wood and char- 
coal and brickyard work. For this labor he re- 
ceived $9.00 per month. Being attacked with 
the western fever in 1870 he removed to Se- 
dalia. Mo., secured employment in a nursery and 
worked at the business for two years with fair suc- 
cess. In 1872 he returned to Canada, where he 
remained four years employing himself at various 
occupations, but generally with poor success. Re- 
moving to Painesville, Ohio, he again worked in 
a nursery at fair wag^es for Storrs & Harrison, 
but remained there only two and one-half years, 
going thence to Massillon, Ohio, where he worked 
as gardener and coachman at $20 a month 
for George Harsh. He returned to Canada in 
the fall of 1880 and purchased some land on 
which he conducted a garden, but in the eighteen 
years he was there he only made $50 a year, al- 
though he worked hard, and spent nothing for 
liquor or tobacco. In 1898 he came to Montana 
and here he has prospered. For one month he 
worked on a ranch for W. K. Floweree, and then 
for A. W. Baur & Co. for $35 per month, re- 
maining with that firm eighteen months. It was 
a lucky strike when Mr. Blyth purchased iGo 
acres of land from C. T. Stark, part of his present 
ranch. The price paid was $3,000. Since then 
he has added thereto 480 acres. He is extensively 
engaged in the cultivation of vegetables. His- 
markets are Neihart, Monarch and Great Falls. 
On October 18, 1880, Mr. Blyth was married to 
Miss Mary M. Schwyer, a native of Stark county, 
Ohio, a daughter of George and Margaret Schwyer. 
The father was a native of France, the mother 
was a Swiss. The father devoted his time to agri- 
cultural pursuits and was a Granger. Both were 
devout members of the Lutheran church. Eleven 
children survived them, viz : Emanuel, Samuel, 
Sarah, Daniel, Malinda, John (killed in a railroad 
accident at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1885), Mary Ann, 
William, George, Louisa and Katie. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Blyth have been born six children : Alton S., 
Roy A., Omar A., Joy L., Mary E. and George 
C. The parents are members of the Methodist 
church. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1003 



ALLEN BLACK is descended from a long line 
of sturdy and thrifty ancestors who made their 
way in the world without the favors of fortune or 
propitious circumstances, carving out of hard con- 
ditions successful and creditable records. He was 
born November 8, 1857, in Schuyler county, Mo., 
whither his parents, Andrew and Elizabeth (Low- 
rie) Black, the former a native of Ohio and the 
latter of Pennsylvania, had settled in the early 
'fifties and engaged in farming. They remained 
there until 1898, and then removed to Montana, 
where they are now ranching on Cow creek, a 
tributary of Rocky Fork of the Yellowstone. They 
were the parents of eleven children, of whom nine 
are still living. 

The grandparents of our subject were Christian 
and Phoebe (Elliott) Black, the former born in 
Pennsylvania and the latter in Virginia. The 
great-grandfather was Andrew Black, a native of 
Pennsylvania and the descendant of a German 
family whose name was originally Schwartz. The 
Elliotts were of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and were 
old Colonial settlers in America. Mr. Black's 
grandfather on the maternal side was engaged in 
the war of 1812, and made a creditable record in 
the service. He was a member of Col. Drake's 
regiment, one of the fighting commands of the 
army. Our subject's father was also a soldier, be- 
ing a member of Company C, Twenty-seventh Mis- 
souri Volunteers, under Col. Curly, and was at the 
siege of A'icksburg and numerous other engage- 
ments. In times of peace he was a builder and 
contractor, and acted as interpreter for his Cer- 
man friends. 

Mr. Black, the immediate subject of this re- 
view, lived in Missouri until 1877, when he deter- 
mined to start in business of some kind for him- 
self. He traveled through various parts of his 
native state, Kansas and Iowa, finally reaching 
Montana in 1883. He located at Dillon and spent 
ten years in ranching and farming in that neigh- 
borhood. He then sold out and removed to Car- 
bon county, settling first on Rocky Fork near 
Red Lodge, but removing from there to the ranch 
he now occupies, one mile west of Carbonado, 
where he is successfully engaged in carrying on 
a ranch and general farming. His land is well 
irrigated, highly productive and improved with 
good buildings, fences, etc. It yields good crops 
of grain and hay, and supports his large and val- 
uable herd of shorthorn cattle together with the 
band of Clydesdale and Shire horses which he has 
on the place. 



On December 29, 1885, Mr. Black was married 
to Miss E. S. Dodge, a native of Boston, Mass., 
and daughter of the late George Dodge. She 
was engaged in teaching school a number of years 
prior to her marriage. They have three children : 
George, Elbert and Herman. They have an at- 
tractive home, and in all respects are progress! \'e 
and up with the times. Mr. Black has taken great 
interest in the development of the community and 
rendered good service to his fellow citizens in 
several capacities. He was a justice of the peace 
for a short time and has been a school trustee. He 
enjoys a liberal share of popularity and the am- 
fidence and esteem of all classes of the people 
around him. 



T OEL J. BOND.— The offspring of two old Ken- 
J tucky families which were prominent in its civil 
and military history for generations, Joel J. Bond 
has in his own record shown how forceful and 
productive are hereditary traits when given a fair 
opportunity for proper exercise. He was born on 
February i, 1841, in Cole county. Mo., near the 
city of Jefferson, a son of William and Sarah (Sul- 
lens) Bond, who were early emigrants from Ken- 
tucky to Missouri, the ultima Thule of 
western civilization. He was educated at the pub- 
lic schools, and when he was twenty years old 
started a finishing course of instruction in the State 
University at Columbia,- but relinquished it by 
reason of ill health. From the university he went 
to Denver, Colo., engaged in freighting into Wyo- 
ming and New Mexico for nearly two years, re- 
turned to Missouri and at Columbia conducted a 
stock and dairy business for ten years, then taught 
for six years at Centre Town, Mo., and came 
to Montana in April, 1881, where he was a 
successful educator in and near Victor for sixteen 
years, with the exception of two years service as 
county superintendent, a position to which he was 
appointed when Ravalli county was created. 

While he was teaching school in the winter Mr. 
Bond was engaged in farming operations during 
the summer, and since he has abandoned the edu- 
cational field he has given especial attention to 
farming, owning a one-third interest in the H. D. 
Aioore fruit farm at Victor. In 1895 his fellow- 
citizens showed their appreciation of his services 
in behalf of local affairs of a public nature by elect- 
ing him as their representative in the Fifth state 
legislature. In this office he displayed legislative 



IO04 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



abilities of a high order. For eighteen or twenty 
years Mr. Bond has been a member of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, holding every office in 
the gift of his lodge. He has also been an active 
member of the Baptist church since i860, and has 
shown a lively interest in its advancement and pros- 
perity. He was married on May 9, 1867, at Colum- 
bia, Mo., to Miss Elizabeth J. Baker, daughter of 
Barnabas and Leah Baker, whose father was a 
prominent and popular Baptist minister. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bond have five children, Anna J., Jessie H , 
now Mrs. C. B. Gates, of Victor ; Hattie L., Judson 
B. and Daisy S. 

Mr. Bond and his son were students at the same 
college, the State University, located at Columbia, 
Mo., and his wife and daughters are all gradu- 
ates of the Stevens College, of Columbia. Mrs. 
Bond is the postmistress of Victor, a position she 
has held for a number of years, and the duties of 
which she has discharged in a manner so gracious 
and satisfactory to all classes of the people as to win 
universal commendation. In political relations Mr. 
Bond is a consistent and ardent Deinocrat, and, while 
seeking none of the honors or emoluments of polit- 
ical preferment, has always evinced a keen and lively 
interest in the success of his party. His home, 
his family and his business absorb his time ami 
energies except that he devotes to the general wel- 
fare of the community, in which he is deeply in- 
terested and in which he has the high respect and 
cordial regard of all his fellow citizens. 



GEORGE B. BOURNE.— Born at the old town 
of Smithfield, Va., on the historic James, Octo- 
ber 25, 1868, whither his father, Thomas B. Bourne, 
had removed from Maryland, his native state, many 
years previously, and had been profitably engaged 
in farming, and losing both his parents before h: 
reached manhood, George B. Bourne early experi- 
enced the afflictions of orphanage and the comforts 
of generous friendship. His father died in 1874, 
when he was six years old, and his mother, Louise 
(Maurice) Bourne, a native of Erie, Pa., of French 
antecedents, died in 1874, when he was sixteen. 
Mr. Bourne was educated at St. Joseph's College, 
Baltimore, Md., and St. John's College, Fordham, 
N. Y., and in 1885 was adopted as a son by John IK. 
and Margaret Hamilton, of Washington, D. C. 
parents of his cousin and present partner, John 
A. Hamilton, with whom he made his home for 



three years thereafter, being employed as book- 
keeper by the Washington Brick Company. In 
1888 he and his cousin and foster-brother, who had 
been schoolmates and boon companions through- 
out life as well, came west and located in Cascade 
county, Mont., near Great Falls, where they at 
once engaged in cattleraising. They were success- 
ful in their undertaking, and in two years had made 
such headway that they were able to locate on their 
present valuable and attractive ranch of some 3,000 
acres on Coral creek in the Sweet Grass hills. 
They have since added many desirable improve- 
ments to the property, and by thrift and industry, 
and the application of brains as well as brawn to 
their work, have made their home one of the most 
productive and profitable in their section of the 
state. They are largely engaged in raising sheep 
and cattle of the best breeds, having in hand an 
average flock of about 13,000 sheep and a herd 
of 300 cattle. They also do a thriving general 
mercantile business in the little town of Hill, which 
is located on their land, and through their in- 
fluence and perseverance have secured for the town 
many of the conveniences which usually come only 
with age and advancement. They have had it made 
a postoffice and distributing point for many kinds 
of commodities. Both Mr. Bourne and his partner. 
Mr. Hamilton, are Republicans in politics. Mr. 
Bourne was elected to the legislature in 1898, and 
after a serviceable term, which pleased his constitu- 
ents, was re-elected in 1900. Mr. Hamilton was born 
in Washington, D. C, and attended the same school 
as Mr. Bourne. They have been partners in every 
business venture and companions socially since 
their childhood. Both have the respect and esteem 
of the community in a high degree, and are looked 
upon as among the most useful and progressive 
citizens in their county. 



T OSEPH BOWDEN.— From the largest whole- 
J sale dry goods house in the greatest com- 
mercial mart in the world to a similar store on a 
much smaller scale in one of the interior towns 
of western Montana, seems like a long descent, 
when it is in fact, in the eye of a true discern- 
ment, a promotion from the position of employed 
to employer, from that of salesman to owner, with 
corresponding independence of feeling and action. 
This long stride has been made by Joseph Bow- 
den, now of Corvallis. in Ravalli countv. He was 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



born in County Cornwall, England, on Novem- 
ber 25, 1864, the only child of Joseph and Eliza- 
beth Bowden, also natives of England. He at- 
tended public and private schools until he was 
sixteen, then served an apprenticeship of four years 
in a drygoods store for which he received no 
pay. Then he went to London and was for the 
next seven years clerk and salesman in the larg- 
est wholesale dry goods establishment in the metrop- 
olis, that of Cook, Son & Co. In 1890 he re- 
signed this position and came to the United States, 
locating at Missoula, where he worked six months 
for the Alissoula Mercantile Company, and at his 
own request was transferred to the branch at Cor- 
vallis, where he remained until 1896. 

He then returned to Missoula, and in Februarv 
bought the stock of the branch house at Cor- 
vallis and with it opened a store of his own, which 
he has been successfully conducting since, carrying 
a larg;e stock and doing an excellent business, 
and pleasing a constantly expanding list of patrons 
with the quality, variety and completeness of its 
wares, and the courtesy, probity and enterprise 
of its business methods. In political affiliation 
Mr. Bowden aligns with the Republican party, and 
fraternally he is allied with the Masons. He was 
married on June 12, 1892, to Miss Annie A. Sum- 
mers, daughter of William and Eliza Summers, of 
London, Endland, the marriage being solem- 
nized at Missoula. They had one child, a son, 
Dudley Francis, eight years old. In social life 
Mr. and Mrs. Bowden hold a high rank, and in pub- 
lic affairs and all that concerns the welfare of the 
community he takes a deep and intelligent inter- 
est, while his business enterprise is looked upon 
as one of the best and best conducted in this part 
of the state. 



MONFORT BRAY.— This progressive ranch- 
man and stockraiser of the new and promis- 
ing county of Rosebud, was horn in the Catskill 
mountains, N. Y., December 4, 1862. His par- 
ents, William and Catherine (Shoemaker) Bray, 
natives of the same place, came to Bismarck, 
N. D., in 1881, and the same year to Miles Citv, 
^lont. In 1882 diev removed to Rosebud valley 
and have since been engaged in the stock busi- 
ness in that section. Their son, Monfort Bray, was 
educated in the district schools of his native county. 
In 1883 he and his brother, Hilan, came to Montana 
and located in Rosebud valley as squatters, after- 



wards homesteading 160 acres and later addino- 
by purchase enough to make their present ranch 
2,600 acres, which they have nearly fenced. The 
ranch Hes along about a mile of the Rosebud 
river bottom, and has adjoining uplands, which 
are well adapted to raising horses and cattle. The 
average herd on the range will soon be 300 head 
of cattle, all high grade shorthorns, and they have 
in addition a number of fine draft and driving 
horses. 

Politically Mr. Bray is a Republican, and has 
been intelligent, active and zealous in the ser- 
vice of his party. From 1888 to 1898 he was 
postmaster at Rasinski; at that time the office 
was discontinued. He belongs to the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, holding membership in 
the lodge at Forsyth. During his residence of 
nearly twenty years in the state he has been a 
substantial aid in its development, and stands high 
in the estimation of his community as a good 
citizen. 



J OHN BOYD.— Exhibiting in his life work and 
J achievements the sturdy and resourceful traits- 
of character of his Scotch ancestry, John Bovd 
is an ornament to American manhood, and a use- 
ful and productive force in the development of 
the great state in which he has cast his lot. He 
was born on April 25, 1865, at Antigonish, Nova 
Scotia, the son of Angus and Mary (McGilvray) 
Boyd of the same nativity. His grandfather came 
from Scotland to American at an early peariod of 
his life, and settling in Nova Scotia, engaged in 
farming. The father of our subject was also en- 
gaged in farming and stockraising up to the age 
of seventy-eight years, when his death occurred 
April 9, 1 90 1. 

Mr. John Boyd was the sixth child and spent 
his school days in his native town. In 1884, when 
but nineteen, he started west to make his own way 
in the world. He secured employment on the 
Canadian Pacific Railroad for a year, at the end 
of which he returned to Antigonish and spent the 
winter. In the spring he again came west by the 
Canadian Pacific, making the trip through British 
Columbia and on into Washington, where he lin- 
gered a short time before leaving for Butte, Mont., 
where he arrived on Christmas day, 1887. There 
he secured employment in the mines for some 
five years, after which he went to Castle and worked 
in the Cumberland mines, having a contract for 



ioo6 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



sinking a shaft 300 feet deep. He was success- 
ful in the job and made considerable money. He 
also served for a time as shift boss in these mines, 
and then went to Neihart and remained until the 
spring of 1895, engaged in mining. From there 
he removed to Rocky Fork, Carbon county, and 
took up his present property, on which he has 
been successfully engaged in farming and stock- 
raising. 

On November 15, 1891, Mr. Boyd married Miss 
Lulu Banta, the daughter of Elbert S. Banta, of 
Gallatin county. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd have three 
children, Lanius, Mamie and Gail, and a pleas- 
ant home that is a center of refined and graceful 
hospitality for their numerous friends. The 
ranch is all under irrigation, and a large portion of 
it is in a high state of cultivation, yielding large 
crops of hay and wheat. In addition to his ranch 
property, Mr. Boyd has, in partnership with his 
brother-in-law, Robert Lee Banta, a lease on 40Q 
acres of farming land, which they intend to put 
under vigorous cultivation. He is an active mem- 
ber of the district school board, has served the 
people well in other public capacities and is a de- 
sirable citizen for anv communitv or state. 



MICHAEL BRASS.— Among the energetic 
and honored citizens of Fergus county who 
claim the German fatherland as the place of their 
nativity is Michael Brass, who is successfully en- 
gaged in ranching and stockgrowing. He was 
born in Nassau, Germany, on December 10, 1854, 
the son of Michael and Catherine Brass, both 
of whom passed their lives in Germany, the father 
dying in 1869 and the mother in 1896. Both were 
Catholics, and the father was a miller and a man 
of honest character. Of their seven children Peter 
and John are deceased, the others are Philip P., 
Christopher H., Johanna, Michael and Anton. 
Michael Brass began to earn wages at the age of 
fourteen, aiding in the support of the family. Af- 
ter three years he came to America and was first 
here employed in a sugar refinery in New York. 
Thence he moved to Wisconsin, devoted six 
months to farm work, then went to St. Louis and 
on to New Orleans, where he was employed in a 
a mill for nine months. Returning to St. Louis, 
after sixteen months he found employment on one 
of the Missouri river boats, and passed the winter 
in St. Louis. Then he was three months in Siou.x 



City, Iowa, when he embarked on one of the 
little steamboats of the upper Missouri and thus 
he came to Montana. From Fort Benton he 
went to Helena, where he worked at placer min- 
ing with fair success. After nearly six years of 
steady and productive labor he returned to his 
home in Germany, where he remained for about 
eighteen months. 

Returning to Helena, Mr. Brass was for two 
years a farmer, then selling his property at a 
good profit he went to Fergus county, and took 
pre-emption and homestead claims on Beaver creek, 
and these constitute his present fine ranch of 320 
acres. It is two miles west of Cottonwood, his 
postofifice address. The ranch is devoted to di- 
versified ranching, gardening and the raising of 
cattle, and Mr. Brass has given careful atten- 
tion to every detail of the enterprise which he is 
so successfully conducting. He also owns a ranch 
of 800 acres on Cottonwood creek in a fine part 
of the county. In politics he is a Democrat and 
both he and his wife are members of the Cath- 
olic church. 

On Christmas day, 1881, Mr. Brass married 
Miss Theresa Staudt, who was born in Germany, 
the daughter of George and Margaret Staudt, 
who came with their family to America, locating 
first in Cincinnati, Ohio, and then on a ranch on 
Rock creek, Fergus county, where the father is 
successfully engaged in farming and stockgrow- 
ing. He is a Democrat and both he and his wife 
are communicants of the Catholic church. Their 
children are Christopher, John. Mary, Theresa 
and George. Mr. and Mrs. Brass have six chil- 
dren, Katie, Elizabeth, Theresa. Charles, Alary 
and Clara. 



CROSSLAND BROOK.— A resident of Mon- 
tana since he was eleven years old, principally 
educated in her public schools and as a man deeply 
interested in her progress and development. Cross- 
land Brook, of Waterloo, Madison county, may 
almost be claimed as a product of the state, not- 
withstanding he was born far across the sea, in 
"Merrie Old England," August 3, 1864, York- 
shire being the place of his nativity. His par- 
ents were James and Mary (Bumby) Brook, also 
natives of Yorkshire, where the father was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of woolens. In 1873 
he emigrated with his family and coming direct 
to Montana located at Waterloo, where he bought 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1007 



the Jameson ranch and at once began farming. 
He continued operations until 1899, when he sold 
out and took a trip to England, intending to re- 
main until 1901. Crossland Brook is a son by a 
second marriage of his father. Two sons and one 
daughter were the fruit of the first marriage, 
one of the sons, Joseph Brook, being now a 
resident of Butte. From the second marriage 
sprang five sons and six daughters. Crossland 
Brook remained on his father's ranch until he was 
twenty-one years of age, when he and his brother 
Henry bought the John Mow ranch and started 
market gardening, in which they are still prof- 
itably engaged. Their business is quite extensive 
and they find a ready market for their produce 
in Butte, the quality of their goods and their up- 
right methods of dealing finding them a ready sale 
for all they raise. 

On Christmas day, 1898, Mr. Brook was mar- 
ried to Miss Bettie Peoples, a native of Missouri, 
and daughter of Robert Peoples, who was born 
-and reared in Illinois, his ancestry bemg German. 
Mr. and Mrs. Brook have one child, an infant 
.son named John. 

Henry Brook, brother of Crossland Brook 
and his partner in business, has much the 
same life story. He was reared on the homestead 
and has spent his life in agricultural pursuits of 
•one kind or another, and like his brother has 
succeeded in all his undertakings. He was mar- 
ried in July, 1893, to Miss Mary Blanding, a native 
of Wisconsin. The Brook brothers have been 
active in the development of the community, tak- 
ing a deep and intelligent interest in all matters 
affecting its welfare, and have won the high re- 
gard and esteem of all classes of people around 
them. Their ranch is a model of thrift and taste, 
of intelligence in methods and diligence in ap- 
plication. Crossland Brook is a member of the 
Knights of the ]\Iaccabees, and finds pleasant and 
profitable entertainment in the meetings of the 
■order. 



DR. EDGAR A. BROOKE.— The personnel of 
the medical profession in Montana is such as 
to reflect great credit on the young and prosper- 
<ius commonwealth, and among its ablest repre- 
sentatives in Ravalli county is Dr. Edgar A. 
Brooke, whose scene of professional labor and 
place of abode is the attractive town of Stevens- 



ville. Nearly all of his life has been passed in 
Montana, and amid her people he has secured that 
distinction in his profession to which his close and 
wisely directed study entitle him, and a high place 
in the regard and esteem of his fellow men of all 
classes. He was born at Bettsville, Md., on Feb- 
ruary 26, 1861, the son of T. M. Brooke, born at 
Morgantown, W. Va., on April 14, 1830. In 
July, 1831, he became a resident of Montana, 
now engaged in stockraising. He was a son of 
Dr. Thomas Frederick Brooke, a native of Mary- 
land, who owned Deer Park in that state. He 
was for many years an eminent medical practi- 
tioner in Maryland and West Virginia, and served 
as a surgeon during the war of 1812; his father 
was also an eminent physician, being a surgeon in 
the Continental army during the Revolution. He 
was of English lineage and a direct descendant of 
the Earl of Warwick. The paternal grandmother 
of Dr. Edgar A. Brooke was a member of the 
Gant family, prominent in the history of Mary- 
land and the war of the Revolution. 

Dr. Edgar A. Brooke received his early educa- 
tional training in the schools of Helena, Mont., 
and was thereafter engaged in tlie stock indus- 
try until 1884, when natural inclination and, per- 
haps, hereditary predilection, prompted him to 
prepare himself for the practice of medicine. The 
accomplishment of his laudable ambition in this 
regard was not easy, owing to the necessity of 
dependence upon his own exertions for defray- 
ing the expenses of his technical course of study. 
He is not easily appalled by difficulties, however, 
and having formed his plans proceeded with en- 
ergy to put them into successful execution. In 
1884 he entered the medical department of George- 
town University, D. C, and later that of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1887 with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. He entered upon his profesional studies at 
( Georgetown with the sum of $5.25 in his possession, 
but he had determined to succeed, and his deter- 
mination was one of action. He earned money for 
his needs by clerking in a law office in Washing- 
ton, and while employed during the days, passed 
his evenings in assiduous efTort toward the at- 
tainment of his desired end with such energy 
that at his graduation he was thoroughly pre- 
pared for his professional duties. After receiving 
his degree the Doctor returned to Montana, and 
]iracticed in the city of Helena until 1891, when 
he removed to Butte and remained there until 



ioo8 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1893. He then returned to Washington city for 
the purpose of taking a post-graduate course, and 
while so doing was also engaged in active prac- 
tice. In 1896 he again located in Butte and was 
soon in control of a large and representative prac- 
tice. In January, 1897, he was appointed county 
physician of Silver Bow county, and in the autumn 
of the succeeding year removed to Virginia City, 
remaining until July, 1900. He then went to Dil- 
lon and on February 21, 1901, he was mar- 
ried to Miss Alice Pierce, of Sheridan, Mont. 
Seeking a larger field of practice he moved in 
January, 1902, to Stevensville, Mont., where he 
is rapidly establishing a reputation as a success- 
ful surgeon and physician. The Doctor is a 
close and observant student, keeping up with the 
best thought and discoveries of his profession, and 
is lecognized as a particularly skillful surgeon, 
having performed many delicate operations, 
among the most notable of which was one in 
Butte in the spring of 1897. A boy had been 
kicked by a horse in such a way as to cause a por- 
tion of the fractured skull to press upon the brain 
and cause idiocy. The Doctor lifted a large por- 
tion of the scalp, removed the offending section, 
trephined the skull, inserted a silver plate over the 
aperture and started the boy on the way to a full 
restoration of his health and normal senses, which 
he now enjoys. Dr. Brooke has a natural apti- 
tude for mechanics that he has employed to good 
advantage in the invention of a number of valuable 
instruments for surgical work. He has also in- 
vented and patented a carriage brake, a most 
serviceable device and has been manufactured and 
extensively sold. He is a genial and captivating 
genileman and is popular in professional and so- 
cial circles, while his practice is distinctively rep- 
resentative in character as well as large in vol- 
ume. 

In politics he gives his support to the Demo- 
cratic party ; fraternally he holds membership in 
the Order of Elks, the Odd Fellows, the Red Men 
;uk1 the Modern Woodmen. He has filled all the 
chairs in his lodge of Odd Fellows and has repre- 
sented it in the Grand Lodge. In each of the 
other orders he has held official stations of high 
rank, and is examinmg physician for the Red Men 
and the \\'oodmen. Since beginning his profes- 
sional career it has been Dr. Brooke's greatest 
ambition to establish and conduct a hospital ac- 
cording to his own methods. Having permanent- 
ly located in Stevensville, near the center of the 



Bitter Root valley, it is his intention at an early 
date to open a hospital where he will be better 
enabled to labor in his favorite work of surgery. 



/^URTIS B. CHITTENDEN.— One of the 
^ venerable and highly honored residents of 
Park county whose life has been filled with "cease- 
less toil and endeavor," with which he has attained 
a due measure of prosperity in temporal affairs, 
^Ir. Chittenden was born in Auburn, N. Y., on 
June 30, 1828, the son of Curtis B. and Armenia 
E. (Humphrey) Chittenden, natives of Durham, 
Green county, N. Y. The former was the son 
of Leveret and Roxelina (Baldwin) Chittenden, 
born in Guilford, Conn., in which state was also 
born the great-grandfather, C. B. Chittenden. 

Curtis B. Chittenden was educated in the public 
schools of his native state, and in 1848 he went 
to New Orleans, thence removed to Memphis, 
Tenn., where he conducted merchandising for 
about two years, when he disposed of his interests 
and returned to New York, locating in Cortland, 
where he was connected witii railroading for 
about twelve years. Then he was roadmaster for 
the New York Central Railroad in Albany for the 
noteworthy period of twenty years, one of the 
trusted officials of that great company. In 1885 
Mr. Chittenden came to Montana, arriving in 
Big Timber in April. After a brief interval he 
purchased land on Mission creek adjoining the 
Crow agency, later securing other land by entry, 
until he had 520 acres. Here he engaged in the 
raising of cattle, and success has attended his^ 
eft'orts, it being- his custom to winter from 
200 to 300 head. From 1885 until 1889 he 
was interested in the Briggs & Ellis Company, 
which frequently wintered 8,000 head of cattle. In 
politics Mr. Chittenden supports the Republican 
party, and has ever manifested great interest in 
the welfare of his state and county. 

Mr. Chittenden has a beautiful residence of fine- 
architectural design, thoroughly modern in all its- 
appointments. In this pleasant home he is happily 
environed, and is enabled to fully enjoy the fruits of 
his able efforts, while he is recognized as one of 
the representative men of the county. In Decem- 
ber, 1850, Mr. Chittenden wedded Miss Harriet 
Tutton, born in Nichols, N. Y., the daughter 
of John Tutton, a native of London. Mrs. Chit- 
tenden was summoned into eternal rest on Octo- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1009 



ber I, 1881, leaving one daughter, Harriet Delta, 
the wife of W. D. Ellis, of New York City. In De- 
cember, 1889, Mr. Chittenden married with Miss 
Hannah C. Hicks, born in Truxton, Cortland coun- 
ty, N. Y., the daughter of Zephaniah and Mary E. 
(Samson) Hicks, natives of Connecticut and 
Massachusetts. The original paternal American 
ancestors were of English lineage, who located in 
New England in the seventeenth century, while 
the Samson genealogy traces direct to Capt. Simeon 
Samson, a naval commander in the Revolution and 
a direct descendant of Miles Standish. 



MAJOR EDWARD G. BROOKE is one of the 
oldest and most highly respected residents of 
Whitehall, Jefferson county, Mont. He was born 
at Deer Park, Allegany (now Garrett) county, 
Md., on September 25, 1819, the son of Dr. Thomas 
F. and Mary (Coddington) Brooke, the former of 
Prince George county and the latter of Allegany 
county, Md. On both sides of the family they came 
of stalwart, patriotic Revolutionary stock, and Dr. 
Thomas F. Brooke served in the war of 1812 
against Great Britain, holding a commission as 
surgeon of the Second Maryland Regiment. He 
was a relative of Capt. Brooke, of the Chesapeake, 
on which Capt. Lawrence's "Don't give up the 
ship," was uttered. . Following the war of 1812 
Dr. Thomas F. Brooke removed to Morgantown, 
\^a., and resumed medical practice, the demand for 
his services soon extending throughout portions of 
Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. After his 
death, in 1836, his widow removed to St. Louis and 
later to Helena, ]\Iont.. where she resided with her 
son, Benjamin C. Brooke. M. D., until her death in 
1877, at the venerable age of eighty-eight years. The 
paternal grandparents were Richard Brooke, M. D., 
and Annie (Duckett) Brooke, both natives of 
Maryland. He was a surgeon in the Revolutionary 
army. The maternal grandparents were Benjamin 
and Annie (Crane) Coddington, both of Trenton, 
N. J. The former was a volunteer in the Conti- 
nental army, having enlisted with three of his 
brothers at Elizabethtown, N. J., immediately after 
the Declaration of Independence. The remaining 
three brothers joined the army as soon as they 
were of sufficient age. Benjamin Coddington took 
part in four battles of prominence, was wounded 
three times, and rendered good service as scout. 
He also served in the navy for a time. 

When E. G. Brooke was two vears of age his 



father removed with his family to Morga-ntown, 
now West Virginia, and there he attended the 
Monongahela Academy. After his father's death in 
1836 he became a clerk in a store, and worked in 
that capacity until 1840. He then opened business 
on his own account near the county seat, which, in 
1 841, he sold and started west. To his new wagon 
he had attached a brake, a recent invention, and as 
he moved westward he observed that the brake at- 
tracted attention and found that his was the first 
wagon with such an appliance to cross the Mississ- 
ippi. He was en route for Howard county. Mo., 
where he had friends in business, and had left 
Virginia on August 23, 1841, with a two-horse 
wagon and 1,650 pounds of writing paper. Cross- 
ing the Ohio at Wheeling the second day out, he 
overtook two teams from New Hampshire, one 
horse and three vehicles to each. With the owners 
he contracted to haul the heaviest wagon for fifty 
cents a day and everything moved along satisfac- 
torily until Sunday. Maj. Brooke refused to travel 
on the Sabbath, and the party claimed that he had 
engaged to haul the wagon and tried to coerce 
him, but he was taken with a chill, followed by a 
fever, and compelled to lay up. The trip was re- 
sumed on Monday morning. 

He arrived in Fayette, Mo., in October, 1841, 
met his friends, unloaded his goods and went to 
freighting for ten days, also making about $300 by 
trading his paper for dried apples, which he carried 
to Burlington, Iowa, and sold to good advantage. 
That winter he was occupied in Burlington as a 
clerk and . in the spring returned to Virginia and 
remained until 1852. The first two years he passed 
in a store in which he had an interest, then be- 
came deputy sheriff, serving nearly three years, 
and then engaged in merchandising and milling. 
In 1852 be removed to St. Louis, and for a couple 
of years he was employed in the office of the city 
weigher. On August 7, 1854, an exciting election 
took place, with considerable rioting. Mai. 
Brooke volunteered on th£ citizens' force com- 
mittee to preserve order. Previous to the organiza- 
tion of this committee about twenty people had 
been killed, but after it got into action no further 
trouble occurred. On the day following this elec- 
tion Maj. Brooke was appointed to a position in 
the city marshal's office, where he continued to 
serve until 1864. Then his health failed, and, on 
the advice of his brother, Benjamin C. Brooke, 
M. D., he removed to Montana, arriving in Vir- 
ginia City on August 18, 1864. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



In the spring of 1866 he decided to return to 
St. Louis by the river. A party of nineteen per- 
sons who had recently arrived, advised him to de- 
lay his trip as the Indians were decidedly hostile. 
Nothing daunted the Major started on the 
journey and when below Livingston Indians fired on 
the boat, killing one man. The rest of the party 
hastily landed on the other side of the river and 
returned to Virginia City. Maj. Brooke then lo- 
cated on a ranch in the Beaverhead valley, above 
Twin Bridges, where he remained about a year, and 
canie to Whitehall. This was the only white frame 
house between Virginia City and Helena. Maj. 
Brooke called it "Whitehall," and from this chris- 
tening the present flourishing town acquired its 
name. The house is still owned by the Major and 
later he kept here a hotel, the Whitehall House, 
which he conducted until 1893, deriving a good 
income therefrom. He also engaged extensively in 
cattle and sheep ranching, and in his eighty-third 
year is enjoying excellent health and is apparently 
as vigorous as are many men at forty. He can ride 
any horse (buckers excepted), and is ready any day 
to demonstrate his ability to ride the sixty-five miles 
to Helena, and he did so by daylight in the summer 
of 1900. He recently rode to Boulder and back the 
same day, sixty-two miles. 

On April 9, 1846, Maj. Brooke was united in 
marriage at Morgantown, now West Virginia, to 
IMiss Eliza Kiger, a native of Virginia. She died 
on September 14, 1847, leaving a son, Fielding L., 
who died at the age of seven months. On May 10, 
1852, he was married, in St. Louis county. Mo., to 
Miss Elizabeth Wolverton, also a native of Vir- 
ginia, who died on April 19, 1855, leaving one son, 
Walter C. W., now in the employment of the North- 
ern Pacific Railroad. On December 31, 1857, he 
was married to Miss Rachel Wolverton, also of 
A'irginia. By her he has had three children, Mary 
B., now Mrs. Noble, of Whitehall ; Marvin, de- 
ceased at the age of thirteen, and Lulu L., now the 
wife of Rev. E. J. Stanley, located in Bitter Root 
valley. The financial, political and social life of 
Maj. E. G. Brooke has been successful in an emi- 
ment degree. Among the people of Whitehall and 
the surrounding country he is highly respected and 
he enjoys the confidence of all. This confidence is 
well illustrated by the fact that he has served three 
terms in the territorial and state legislatures of 
Montana. Fraternally he is a Mason, having taken 
the master mason's degree in 1843. He became a 
Knight Templar in i860, and is a stanch member 
of the Methodist church South. 



T OHN H. BROWN.— Of an old Colonial family, 
J long resident at Fulton, Oswego county, N. Y., 
where he was born April 16, 1846, on a homestead 
which has been in possession of the family from a 
period prior to the Revolution, John H. Brown, of 
near Absarokee, Mont., has been well prepared 
by nature and training for the duties of American 
citizenship in its best form, and in his busy and 
varied life has been true to the traditions of his 
family. His parents were William and Achsa 
(Blanchard) Brown, also natives of Oswego coun- 
ty, N. Y., the home of their parents. The Browns 
came from England to America among the early 
settlers of the new world, and found a secure and 
agreeable abiding place on soil where they flour- 
ished through many generations, the homestead 
on which they have lived so long being in the pos- 
session of the oldest brother of Mr. Brown. The 
elder Brown died at the age of forty-six ; and his 
widow in 1899, aged ninety-six. Air. Brown's 
oldest brother, William, served in the Union navy 
during the Civil war, and at its close returned to 
the old homestead, on which he has since con- 
tinued to live. 

John H. Brown was educated at the public 
schools of his native county, remaining at home 
until he was twenty years of age. He then 
started west, locating at Cleveland, Ohio, and for 
three years was in the employ of a railroad com- 
pany as a conductor between that city and Toledo. 
He then removed to Chicago and passed six years 
in that city, one in the employ of the Parmalee 
Omnibus Company, and the other five in the coach 
and livery business which he purchased after the 
great fire and continued to conduct until 1875. 
He then sold out, and, removing to Omaha, engaged 
in the hotel business ; but after nine months sold out 
and went on the stampede to the Black Hills, 
where he remained six years engaged in conduct- 
ing a hotel, making money in that enterprise and 
losmg it in mining speculations. In 1882 he sold 
all his interests in that section and came to Mon- 
tana, locating at Cook City and going vigorously 
to work in mining enterprises. He still has valu- 
able holdings in mining claims at that place, some 
of which promise well. In 1899 he bought a ranch 
on the west fork of the Stillwater and began oper- 
ations in cattleraising, which he is still conduct- 
ing. He has had the varied experience of adversi- 
ty and prosperity; has encountered dangers and 
adventures of thrilling interest, but has ever car- 
ried with him "a heart for any fate." He is uni- 
versally esteemed where he is known, exhibiting 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



toward all comers a courteous and genial manner 
and having the miner's considerateness and hospi- 
tality for all his fellowmen. 



w 



J ILLIAM F. BROWN, the treasurer and 
manager of the Western Hardware Com- 
pany, of Great Falls, of which city he is a promi- 
nent citizen, was born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, 
on May 31, 1857. His father, Wilham \'. Brown, 
who is still living, was born at Yarmouth, Nova 
Scotia, in 1837, where he was long engaged in the 
law and insurance business and very active and 
prominent in all public affairs, holding for many 
years the office of magistrate at Yarmouth, where 
he was once a candidate for the Canadian par- 
liament. He is now residing- at Berwick, Nova 
Scotia, retired from active business. His grand- 
father, William Brown, a native of Londonderry, 
Ireland, was, during the Revolution, private secre- 
tary to Lord Howe, with the rank of colonel. He 
removed to Nova Scotia after the surrender of 
LiM'd Cornwallis. William A'. Brown's father, 
Charles Brown, was a farmer and trader in Nova 
Scotia, where he died in 1870. His mother, Agnes 
(Churchill) Brown, was a direct descendant from 
the famous Duke of Marlborough. The mother 
of William F. Brown, Sarah (Murray) Brown, was 
born at Liverpool. Nova Scotia, in 1837, and was 
the daughter of Rev. P. F. Murray, a Baptist min- 
ister. She died at Port Lome, Nova Scotia, in 

William F. Brown received his education in the 
Yarmouth schools and the excellent high school 
of Boston, Mass., from which he was graduated in 
1877. Between the time of his leaving Yarmouth 
and his entering the Boston high school, Mr. 
Brown passed three years as a sailor in the mer- 
chant service. He returned to Yarmouth from 
Boston and for a year was a clerk in a grocery. 
In 1879 Mr. Brown went to Alinneapolis, where 
for eight years he was head bookkeeper for the 
large hardware house of Aliller Bros. & Fletcheip, 
and from 1887 until 1890 he was in the hardware 
business on his own account at Anoka. Minn., 
aliout fourteen miles from Minneapolis. In De- 
cember, 1890, Mr. Brown came to Montana, locat- 
ing at Great Falls. Here he became treasurer of 
the Great Falls iron works, and for seven years 
held that position. In January, 1896, he formed a 
partnership with John A. Collins in the hardware 



and plumbing business, as Brown & Collins. In 
1900 this business was incorporated as the West- 
ern Hardware Company, and from that time Mr. 
Brown has been its treasurer and the manager of 
the hardware department. 

In 1884, at Stillwater, Minn., Mr. Brown was 
married to Miss Nellie Benner, daughter of H. F. 
and Jane Benner. They have three children, Inez 
L.. aged fifteen ; S. Bernice, aged thirteen, and Her- 
man A'., aged eleven years. Politically iMr. Brown 
is a Democrat and has always taken an active in- 
terest in municipal affairs and in the political cam- 
paigns of the state. Fraternally he is a Knight 
Templar in the Masonic order, bemg junior war- 
den of the grand commandery of Montana, and he 
is a past high priest in the Royal Arch Masons. 
He is a past grand in the Odd Fellows' brother- 
hood, and is past advisor and lieutenant in the or- 
der of the Woodmen of the World, also a member 
of the United Workmen and of the Canadian 
American Society of Montana. Financially and 
socially Mr. Brown's career in the state of his 
adoption has been eminently successful. He is a 
man of great executive capacity, and stands high 
in the estimation of a large circle oiacquaintances. 



\ AIOS BUCK.— With a genius for pubhc affairs 
l\ and mercantile pursuits which has enabled 
him to give attention to both with very gratifying 
success, Amos Buck, of Stevensville, has found in 
the northwest opportunity for the full play of his 
productive faculties. He is a native of Bellevue, 
Sandusky county, Ohio, born on February 26, 
1844. He was the twelfth of the thirteen children 
of Cieorge and Susan (Shell) Buck, natives of Penn- 
sylvania, who had early taken up their residence 
in Ohio and afterward removed to Monroe, Mich., 
when Amos was eight years old. ]Mr. Buck be- 
gan his education in the pubhc schools of Monroe, 
Mich., and when sixteen he entered the high school 
which he attended for two years, finishing it af the 
state normal school at Ypsilanti. Mich., from 
which he received a teacher's certificate, but in- 
stead of teaching he went to clerking in a store 
at Bellevue, Ohio, where he remained for three 
years. 

In 1864, seeking a wider field, he came to Mon- 
tana, arriving at Alder gulch on September 5, in 
the midst of its great mining excitement. In 
May, 1865, he went to Helena and followed mining 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



until the next spring. He then mined at Califor- 
nia gulch until fall, when he for four years mined 
successfully at Lincoln gulch. His brothers, 
Henry and Frederick, had now joined him, and 
they built a boat and went down the Big Blackfoot 
river to Cedar creek, where they engaged in min- 
ing for three years, coming to Stevensville in 1876. 
Here they bought a merchandising establishment 
and conducted business as Buck Brothers for ten 
years, when Mr. Buck sold his interest to his 
brothers, and entered into partnership with another 
brother, George, who had come from California, 
and they engaged in merchandising for three years 
as Amos Buck «& Co. By that time a nephew, 
Frank J. Burrough, had come from Michigan, and 
the three incorporated the Amos Buck Mercantile 
Company, in which they are doing an extensive 
and constantly expanding busniess, which has 
compelled them to add a new sawmill to their 
plant within the last few months. 

By his enterprise and diligence and his business 
qualifications, Mr. Buck has accumulated valuable 
property in Stevensville and elsewhere and other 
holdings of great value. His home is one of the 
most attractive in the town, and his interest in the 
welfare of Bitter Root valley is unsurpassed among 
its people. He has manifested this in every wor- 
thy way, especially in the development of the edu- 
cational and mercantile forces of the community. 
He is now deeply concerned in the new training 
school at Stevensville, to which he has rendered 
valuable service on its building committee and 
made liberal contributions of time, money and 
other substantial aid. In politics Mr. Buck is a 
stanch Republican, active in his party, but seeking 
no honors or emoluments. He is at present 
(1901) worshipful master of the Masonic lodge 
at Stevensville and a past noble grand in the order 
of Odd Fellows, of which he has been a member 
for twenty-five years and in which he has served 
as representative to the grand lodge several 
times. He also belongs to the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. On September 12, 1883, he 
was married at Missoula, to Miss Rose V. Knapp, 
a graduate of Albion (Mich.) College, a lady of 
scholastic attainments and high culture, .\fter lier 
graduation she came to Missoula and gave to the 
community the benefit of her scholarship and ability 
as a teacher until she was married. They have 
one son, Charles Amos, now fourteen years old. 

When the dark cloud ol the Ncz Perces war 
lowered upon the land and human life and public 



and private interests were threatened by savage 
fury, he was among the first to oiifer his services 
in quelling the uprising and was engaged in the 
most active part of the ensuing struggle. After 
the war he wrote and published in the Hamilton 
Bitter Root Times in the issue of August 18, 1899, 
a vivid account of one of the most thrilling inci- 
dents of the war, entitled "The Battle of Big Hole," 
which has been widely read and highly com- 
mended. From whatever viewpoint it is examined 
Mr. Buck's career is inspiring. His success in 
business, his persistency in effort, his intelligent 
direction of public sentiment, his stimulating public 
spirit and his happy domestic life are alike engaging 
themes of contemplation and useful examples. 



HENRY BUCK.— Among the substantial and 
enterprising citizens of Bitter Root valley to 
whom that section owes its advanced development 
and enlightened, progressive spirit, none stands 
higher than Henry Buck, of Stevensville. He is 
one of the well-known Buck brothers, whose busi- 
ness capacity, breadth of view and fine public 
spirit have made them extensively known in this 
portion of the northwest, one of whom, Amos, has 
extended notice elsewhere in this volume. 'Mr. 
Buck was born near Bellevue, in Sandusky county, 
Ohio, on August 13, 1846, the youngest of the 
thirteen children of George and Susan (Shell) 
Buck, natives of Pennsylvania, who after- tarrying 
awhile in Ohio after their marriage, removed to 
Monroe, Mich., where Henry received his educa- 
tion in the public schools, graduating from the high 
school in 1866, and a year later from Albion Com- 
mercial College. He taught school for two years 
in Michigan, then came to Montana, making the 
trip on the steamer Nile up the Missouri river to 
Fort Benton, thence going to Lincoln gulch where 
he was for two years mining, going from there to 
Cedar creek with his brothers, and following the 
same pursuit for another year. In 1871 he bought 
a ranch near Florence in Bitter Root valley, and, 
stocking it with cattle, was here two years en- 
gaged in the independent occupations of farming 
and stockraising. He then returned to Cedar 
creek where he and his brothers had extensive and 
profitable mining interests. In the fall of 1875 he 
returned to the ranch and in the spring bought a 
general store at Stevensville in company with his 
brothers, Amos and Frederick, and this was con- 
ducted under the firm name of Buck Brothers. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1013 



Later he and Fred bought out Amos and con- 
tinued the business as F. & H. Buck. On January 
31, 1890, Fred died, but the same name was con- 
tinued until a nephew, Charles Buck, now (1901) 
treasurer of the county, purchased the interest of 
Fred's widow, and the firm has since been known 
as H. Buck & Co. In 1894, Mr. Buck started a 
fruit orchard of forty acres in which he planted 
apple trees mostly, but mingled with them some 
other varieties of fruit. This enterprise is begin- 
ning to yield handsome returns and promises to be 
one of the profitable institutions of the county. He 
is also interested in mining at the Whippoorwill and 
Last Chance mines. Mr. Buck has been successful 
in business and is public spirited enough to invest 
a liberal portion of the results in such public im- 
provements as tend to elevate the community. He 
has been a generous contributor to the training- 
school now in course of erection at Stevensville, 
and serves as treasurer of the institution. In fact 
he is never backward in aiding any worthy enter- 
prise. In politics he is an unwavering Republican, 
always interested in the success of his party, and 
doing his share toward that end. In 1896 he ran 
for representative, but although getting a handsome 
vote was unable to overcome the adverse majority. 
He is a member of the Masonic order. He was 
married on April 2, 1878, to Miss Clara E. Elliott, 
of Hamilton. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren, Carrie Belle, deceased: Fred S. and Clarence 
H. His wife died March 28, 1897. On April 5, 
1900, he contracted a second marriage. The bride 
was Miss Nellie B. Haynes, daughter of William 
N. Haynes, a prominent farmer near Miles City. 



LLOYD CANNON, one of the prosperous min- 
ers of Broadwater county, was born at Loving- 
ton, Moultrie county. 111., on December 14, 1861, 
the son of W. H. and Jane (Williams') Cannon, 
natives of Delaware and Ohio. They were married 
in Lovington, 111., where W. H. Cannon was a car- 
penter and builder. In their family were six sons 
and one daughter. W. H. Cannon was the son of 
Stephen Cannon, a native of Delaware, who mar- 
ried a Miss Wright, of Maryland. His father was 
nominated for governor of Delaware, but died the 
day before the election. In 1877 he removed to 
Buffalo, Kan., still followed his former business and 



also purchased farms, which he worked for him. 
The maternal grandfather of Lloyd Cannon was 
John Williams, a native of Ohio. He married a 
Miss Hopkins, whose father took active part in 
the Revolution, and served at Fort Du Quesne, now 
Pittsburg, Pa. The paternal grandfather, Stephen 
Cannon, was a judge for many years in Illinois, and 
in 1876, at the age of seventy years, he was elected 
to the legislature by his personal popularity, over- 
coming a normally victorious opposition. 

Lloyd Cannon received his education in the public 
schools of Kansas, and removed to Montana in 
1 88 1. He located first at Glendale, Beaverhead 
county, where he profitably engaged in mining 
for five years, and then took charge of a smelter 
for Gasert & Reading, at Coke City. After this 
he removed to Wickes, and was employed at the 
smelting and reduction works for eighteen months, 
and then made a three-months unprofitable pros- 
pecting trip to the head of Wise river, near the 
Idaho line. He then located at Empire, in Lewis 
and Clarke county, and was employed as prospector 
for another year, where he began mining on his 
own account at Grand Butte, Lewis and Clarke 
county. Here he wrought industriously and suc- 
cessfully for seven years, selling out at a good 
profit. Going to Winston he purchased the mine 
known as "Stolen Sweets," which he is still oper- 
ating with good success. 

On April 13, 1883, Mr. Cannon was married to 
Miss Mary Bell Hardesty, of Iowa, a daughter of 
James Hardesty, a native of Missouri. As a young- 
man he had con-ie to Montana, settling at Bannaclv 
in 1864, and is now living at Colfax, Wash. Mrs. 
Cannon died on July 20, 1890, leaving one child, 
Gertrude, who resides with her grandfather at 
Colfax. Mr. Cannon's twin brother, Floyd, arrived 
in Glendale, Mont., in 1880, but after a short stay 
he was compelled to return on account of sickness. 
In 1885, he returned and joined his brother. They 
have since kept together, and he is an equal owner 
with Lloyd in the mining property in Lewis and 
Clarke county, which he superintends. Another 
brother, Jesse M., came to Montana in 1894, and he 
is an equal partner in the "Stolen Sweets" prop- 
erty. Jesse M. Cannon married Miss Julia Bran- 
non. Lloyd Cannon is a Democrat. He was elect- 
ed in 1900 to the state legislature, and served with 
ability and distinction during his official career. 
He is a man of sterling character and sound busi- 
ness judgment, numbering a host of friends. 



IOI4 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



ALBERT BUDAS. — Among the sterling young 
men of foreign birth who have become identi- 
fied with the industrial life of Montana and have 
attained success through honest and earnest en- 
deavor, is the subject of this review, one of the rep- 
resentative business men of the thriving little city 
of Red Lodge, Carbon county, where he conducts 
a flourishing general merchandising business. 
Mr. Budas is a native of the city of Tornea, Swe- 
den, where he was born on May 24, 1866, being 
one of the two sons of Henry and Eva (Rickkala) 
Budas, the former of whom was born in Tornea 
and the latter in Finland. The father was the 
owner of a flouring mill, and both he and his wife 
passed their entire lives in the fair Norseland, be- 
ing folk of sterling character. The subject of this 
review was reared in his native city, in whose 
schools he received his early educational discipline. 
After leaving 'school he was variously employed 
until 1887, when he severed the ties which bound 
him to home and native land and set forth to seek 
his fortunes in America. From New York city he 
made his way to Minnesota, where he tarried about 
six months and then came to Montana, locating in 
Butte, where he was employed in the mining in- 
dustry until 1890, coming thence to Red Lodge 
and engaging in the liquor business for three 
months. He then turned his attention to general 
merchandise, opening a small establishment which 
he conducted for some time, eventually selling the 
business to the firm of Yeagan Talmage I\Ier- 
cantile Company, in whose employ he remained 
for three years. He then resumed business in the 
mercantile line, associating himself with Messrs. 
Flager and Wright in the organization of the Car- 
born Mercantile Company, with which he was iden- 
tified about eighteen months, when he disposed of 
his interests and inaugurated his present enter- 
prise, one of the most important in the city. He 
has erected a handsome and commodious brick 
block of two stories, the same being eligibly lo- 
cated on Main street. The ground floor is de- 
voted to the accommodation of his large and select 
stock of general merchandise; his trade is of a 
large and representative character, owing in great 
measure to his personal popularity and scrupulous 
care in catering to the wants of his customers. 
The upper story of the building is utilized as lodge 
rooms for various civic and fraternal organiza- 
tions. In political matters the support of Mr. 
Budas is given to the Republican party ; he has 
rendered effective service as a member of the 



board of aldermen of Red Lodge and as one of the 
zealous members of the board of school trustees. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World. 

On July 20, 1893, Mr. Budas was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Katie Rouan, who was born in Penn- 
sylvania, the daughter of James Rouan, who came 
to Montana in 1892 and here passed the remainder 
of his life, his death occurring in 1900. Mr. and 
Mrs. Budas have one daughter, Evangeline, born 
February 6, 1897. 



EPPA H. BUTCHER.— Employed in the profit- 
able business of general ranching, in the Wolf 
creek district of Lewis and Clarke county. Mont., 
is Eppa H. Butcher. The gradual accumulations 
of years fraught with patient toil and industry 
have resulted in one of the finest and most con- 
veniently located ranches in the valley. His suc- 
cess is as pronounced as it is richly deserved. 
He was born in Farquier county, Va., on Septem- 
ber 25, 1848. He is the son of Martin O. and 
Judith A. Butcher, both natives of Virginia. In 
1855 the family removed to Missouri and engaged 
in farming and stockraising, but fortune seemed 
to" frown upon their most laudable efforts. They 
were members of the Baptist church, devout and 
consistent Christians, and politically Mr. Butcher 
was a Democrat. He died on July 10, 1883, and 
was followed by his wife in May, 1899, at the age 
of eighty-four. Up to the age of thirteen Eppa 
H. Butcher attended the common schools, so his 
education was limited. But he was a youth of 
intelligence and made the most of his opportuni- 
ties. From his school days he engaged in farm 
work for his parents at which he continued until 
1872, with a few years devoted to clerking in dry 
goods and druggist lines. 

In the spring of 1877 he rented a farm on which 
he confesses that he made enough the first year 
to pay the rent, and the second year put by suf- 
ficient to pay the rent and stock up for three years 
ahead. Fie now had a fund on hand that enabled 
him to take a little leisure, and with it he made a 
trip to Montana in March, 1880. He located at 
Craig and worked at farm and stock work, re- 
ceiving from $35 to $55 per month and board. 
After a year's service Mr. Butcher rented a ranch 
and worked it one year quite successfully and then 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



took up a squatter's claim nine miles northwest of 
Wolf creek, improved it somewhat and disposed of 
it for $250. He then returned to Craig, re-rented 
the place he had formerly occupied and remained 
there two 3'ears, when he removed to his present 
ranch, which consists of homestead and desert 
claims of 200 acres, to which he has added 1,280 
acres of railroad land. His land is mostly grazing 
land, but he raises two and one-half tons of hay to 
the acre, and makes a specialty of raising horses and 
cattle. On November 29, 1876, Mr. Butcher was 
married to Miss Georgia A. Dixon, a native of 
Hart county, Ky. She is the daughter of Christo- 
pher M. and Sallie S. Dixon, both natives of Ken- 
tucky. The father, who devoted his time to farm- 
ing and teaching, was a Democrat, and held the 
positions of assessor, deputy sherifif, sheriff and 
constable. He was also a member of the Baptist 
church, a Master and a Royal Arch Mason. He 
passed from life November 23, 1892, and his 
widow resides with her oaughters in Montana, 
having come here in 1899. Mr. and Mrs. Eppa 
H. Butcher have three children, Robert B., Mary 
E. and Logan D. The parents are both members 
of the Baptist church, and Mr. Butcher is a Demo- 
crat. 



WILLIAM A. CALDWELL is numbered 
among the prosperous and progressive farm- 
ers and stockgrowers of Gallatin county, where 
he is held in high esteem by reason of his sterling- 
character and those well directed efforts that have 
brought him a due measure of success. He is 
essentially a self-made man, has had the ability to 
take advantage of the opportunities of life, and has 
ever had a distinctive appreciation of the dignity of 
honest toil, since through this* medium has he 
wrought out his own success. Back to that cradle 
of much of our national history, the Old Dominion, 
must we turn in tracing the genealogy of the sub- 
ject of this review, since we find that his parents, 
Audley P. and Catherine (Peters) Caldwell, were 
both born in the state of Virginia, whence they re- 
moved to Rhea county, Tenn., where William A. 
was born November 25, 1859. His father died in 
that county when our subject was ten years of age; 
the mother died in Montana in the year 1895. In 
the family were five children, all of whom are li/- 
ing save one daughter. William A. Caldwell was 
reared on a farm, and secured such educational ad- 
vantages as were afforded in the district schools 



in the vicinity of his home. At the age of twenty 
years, in 1879, he came to Montana, locating at 
Bozeman, where he found employment in a brick 
yard. He soon after turned his attention to farm- 
ing in Gallatin county, renting a place in the vicinity 
of his present ranch and there continuing operations 
for a period of two years. He then purchased a 
tract of 240 acres, paying for the same with money 
which he had saved through industry and economy, 
and later purchased an additional tract of equal 
area. At the expiration of fourteen years he dis- 
posed of the property and purchased another farm 
of 320 acres in the same locality which he held for 
two years, but disposed of to advantage and bought 
his present fine ranch of 320 acres, to which he 
has added 265 acres. This fine estate is located 
seven miles northwest of Bozeman, and two and .1 
half miles southeast of Belgrade, his postoffice and 
shipping point. He has secured excellent results 
from the cultivation of his fertile land, has made 
the best of permanent improvements, including a 
commodious and attractive residence, and is now 
preparing to devote more particular attention to the 
raising of high grade live stock. When he arrived 
in Montana Mr. Caldwell liad only $25, and that 
was soon expended for board; and in view of this 
fact the success which has attended his efforts is 
all the more gratifying, while none can doubt hi;; 
courage, self-reliance and indomitable energy, since 
only through such means could he have ac- 
complished such results. 

In politics he gives his allegiance to the Demo- 
cratic party, and his first presidential vote was cast 
for Grover Cleveland, in 1892 — this representing;- 
the first presidential election after Montana had 
been admitted to the Union. In Gallatin county, 
on the 4th of March, 1885, Mr. Caldwell was unitei! 
in marriage to Miss Jessie Harold, and of this 
union five children were born, one of whom, Cor- 
nelia, died at the age of three years; those living 
are: Kieth, James Paul, Nellie and Beulah. 



DUNCAN CAMERON, one of the prosperous 
farmers and leading citizens of Cascade coun- 
ty, resides on a valuable and well-equipped ranch 
near Evans postoffice, and twelve miles from 
Stockett. He was born at West Bay, Cape 
Breton, Canada, January 4, 1833. He is the son of 
of Dugald and Christie (McCray) Cameron. The 
mother was a daughter of Duncan and Christi'- 



ioi6 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



McCray, natives of Scotland, who, coming to Nova 
Scotia, there took up timber land at the head 
of West bay, where they developed a fine farm and 
amassed wealth. Mrs. McCray died at West Bay 
in 1880, her husband surviving her until 1887. 
Duncan Cameron was reared on the wild coast of 
Cape Breton, and until he was twelve years old 
engaged in a variety of employments, attending 
the winter schools and farming in the summers. 
In 1845 he drove a team for a very wealthy man 
named Cameron (no relation) for a year, and then 
shipped on the schooner Violet, owned by Capt. 
Grant. For nine months he followed the sea, and 
returned home, remaining there until 1849. Then 
purchasing a team he worked profitably for three 
years, until 1852, on St. Peter's canal, Cape Bre- 
ton. He then again returned to his home and 
worked on his father's farm until 1854. At that 
time his father gave him 150 acres of land, and this 
was the nucleus of his fortune. 

In 1855 Mr. Cameron married Miss Maggie 
McLaughlin, daughter of Donald and Kate Mc- 
Laughlin, of West Bay, Cape Breton. To them 
were born nine children. Katie and Dugald Hen- 
ry died at West Bay and Daniel and Kittie Chris- 
tina died at Evans. The survivors are Anna L. 
(r^Irs. Daniel Durand), Alexander S.. Dugald H. 
and Stella M. Soon after his marriage Mr. Cameron 
became a stage driver, carrying the mails for two 
steamers plying between West Bay and Fort 
Hawksbury, making two trips a week. This he 
did at his own risk for thirteen years. The steam- 
er Napkin, Capt. Beattie, connected with the 
steamer St. Lawrence, running from Sidney to 
West Bay, Cape Breton, in charge of Capt. Cam- 
eron. From 1868 he was again farming until July, 
1882, when he came to Bismarck, N. D., and there 
farmed profitably for seven years. In 1889 he re- 
moved to Montana, and located at his present 
home, twelve miles from Stockett and twenty-fi\-e 
miles from Great Falls. He now possesses 720 
acres in his handsome ranch, 300 of which are un- 
der cultivation. He raises superior stock and 
magnificent crops without irrigation, and he usual- 
ly winters 140 head of cattle and about twenty 
horses. Mr. Cameron has ever manifested indus- 
try, good business judgment and the highest in- 
tegrity. His life in Montana has been one of al- 
most continuous prosperity, but, being a man of 
strong character and determination he would have 
won success in any favorable location. He is 
highly esteemed and the family are leaders in soci;d 



circles. For over twenty years he and his Wife 
have been members of the Presbyterian church, 
holding their present connection with the church 
at Great Falls. Their active aid is given, however, 
to any evangelical Protestant church. Mr. Cam- 
eron was "made a Mason" at Port Hawksbury, 
Cape Breton, m 1858, and still retains his member- 
ship in the lodge where he was initiated, passed 
and raised. 



ROBERT R. LYTLE.— The pastoral industry 
in Montana is one of magnificent scope and 
importance and shows steady increase with the 
passing of the years, the great flocks being found 
on a thousand hills, valleys and ranges. Among 
those conspicuously and extensively identified 
with sheepgrowing in Choteau county is Mr. Rob- 
ert R. Lytic, who there has a fine ranch property. 
He also has a pleasant residence in Great Falls, 
Cascade county. Mr. Lytle was born in Indiana 
county, Pa., on October 23, 1848, the son of Alex- 
ander and Mary W. (Smith) Lytle. The father, a 
tanner by trade, was born in Pennsylvania in 1818. 
In 1857 he removed to Washington county, Iowa, 
where he engaged in agriculture until his death in 
1888. His widow survived him until January 30, 
1 90 1, her death then occurring at Great Falls at 
the home of her son Robert. 

Robert R. Lytle received his education at public 
schools and the academy at Washington, Iowa, 
and assisted in the work of the homestead farm 
until the death of his father. In the fall of 1888 
he came to Montana, locating near Augusta, in the 
Sun river valley, where he was engaged in sheep- 
raising for a year. He then associated himself 
with Louis Marsh in the sheep business, on the 
Marias river, near Fort Conrad, where he re- 
mained about two years. In the spring of 1893 
he established himself in his present location, in 
the Pend d'Oreille coulee in Choteau county, his 
ranch being located twenty-five miles east of Pon- 
dera station. Here he took up government land, 
and to this has since added by purchase until his 
landed estate now comprises 1,560 acres. He also 
has access to and utilizes a great area of open or 
free range. He devotes his attention especially to 
the raising of improved grades of sheep, and he 
usually has from 5,000 to 6,000 head. He has 
been successful, as he deserves to be, as he has 
given thought, executive ability and correct busi- 
ness methods to his occupation. Mr. Lytle has a 




^'^t^^^U:^-^P. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



fine residence property in the city of Great Falls, 
located in the south division of the city, and here 
he and his family live during the winters, the sum- 
mer seasons usually being passed on the ranch. 
In politics Mr. Lytle is a stalwart Republican, and 
he has been an active and a public-spirited and 
progressive citizen. 

At Washington, Iowa, in 1876, Mr. Lytle was 
united in marriage with Miss Belle Gordon, who 
was born near Cedarville, Ohio, March 27, 1851, 
and they have two sons — James Elmer and Robert 
Clarence. Mrs. Gordon descends from Scotch line- 
age, domiciled in Ohio and Iowa for several gener- 
ations. She is a woman of ability, and was for 
many years a prominent and successful teacher. 



PATRICK CARNEY, well and favorably known 
in political and business circles in Montana, 
is a resident of Waterloo, Madison county. He 
was born in County Westmeath, Ireland, on March 
II, 1851, the son of John and Anna (Kelly) Car- 
ney, both natives of the same county in Ireland. 
In 1863 the father, John Carney, came to the 
United States, locating in Pennsylvania, and then 
in Boston, Mass. He remained until 1897, when 
he removed to Montana. Patrick Carney lived in 
Boston until he was seventeen years of age, re- 
ceiving his education in the excellent public 
schools of that city, and in 1868, while still a youth, 
he made the adventurous journey across the plains 
of Montana and to Alder gulch, his first location. 
He soon removed to Jefiferson valley, where he en- 
gaged in placer mining for several years in con- 
nection with farming. 

He remained here achieving considerable suc- 
cess in a diversity of pursuits until 1873, when he 
went to Madison county and a few months later to 
Butte, where he continued six years, engaged in 
mining and the mason's trade. In 1879 he re- 
moved to his present location, taking land under 
the homestead act, and engaging in farming and 
stockraising. On March 12, 1876, Mr. Carney 
was united in marriage to Arminda E. Butt, a 
native of Jackson county, Mo., who came to Mon- 
tana with her parents, Jonas and Loanna (Gist) 
Butt, in 1864, the family being among the pioneers 
of the state. Mrs. Carney died on June 23, 1895. 
She was the mother of five children who survive 
her, their names being, Lillian May, now the wife 
of Waher Brooks; Rose Anna, Thomas Edwin, 
John ^^'ilson and Ella Elizabeth. On October 2, 



1900, Mr. Carney was united in marriage to Ida 
Jeffries, a native of Mexico, Mo. 

Politically Mr. Carney is a Democrat. He 
served in the First and Second terms of the Mon- 
tana state legislature as representative from Madi- 
ison county. In 1896 he was elected county com- 
missioner, and in 1900 he received the nomination 
for the same office but withdrew, as he had been 
nominated as one of the presidential electors for 
Montana on the Democratic ticket. This nomina- 
tion (for elector) he also resigned, as he was then 
serving as a county commissioner and a question 
arose concerning his eligibility. At present he is 
president of the board of trustees of the State 
Orphans' Home, of which office he has been the 
incumbent for the past eight years. During Mr. 
Carney's residence in Waterloo he has served as 
school trustee, clerk, road supervisor and justice 
of the peace for many years and for various suc- 
cessive terms. Fraternally he is very prominent. 
In 1894-5 he served as grand master of the United 
Workmen, and represented Montana four terms in 
supreme lodge at Bufifalo, N. Y. ; Asbury Park, 
N. J.; Milwaukee, Wis., and Indianapolis, Ind. 
He was one one of the principal projectors in the 
erection of the elegant United Workmen's hall in 
Waterloo. Since 1873 he has been a Royal Arch 
Mason, and an Odd Fellow, and a Knight of the 
Maccabees. As one of the Montana pioneers Mr. 
Carney has been successful. He has seen the 
state emerge from the rude conditions of a terri- 
tory to a splendid commonwealth. In this transi- 
tion he has played no unimportant part. With 
the progress of the state he has acquired pros- 
]:)erity and won the regard of a host of friends in 
his home city, his county and the state. 



T EW WALLACE CARPENTER.— A native of 
L/ Illinois, and born in Sandwich, February 28, 
1864, removing thence when but a year old to State 
Center, Iowa, then at the age of fourteen coming 
farther west to Nebraska, and four years later 
reaching Montana, the progress of the subject of 
this review may be said to have been steadily west- 
ward from his childhood until he found a per- 
manent anchorage in the great Treasure state 
which he has since made his home. 

His father, Wallace Carpenter, who is associate.l 
with him in business, has had an eventful and 
varied career. He was born at Syracuse, N. Y., 



ioi8 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



February 5, 1832, and when he reached his legal 
majority, in 1853, crossed the plains with an ox 
team to Oregon and California, where he followed 
mining for about five years. Returning to De 
Kalb county, 111., he spent the next seven years in 
farming in that locality. At the end of that period 
he removed to Iowa, where he and his three broth- 
ers, T. B., J. B. and B. F. Carpenter, engaged in 
a general live-stock and merchandising business 
from 1865 to 1878. From then to 1887 he was 
operating a live-stock commission business in Chi- 
cago. In 1887 he again settled in Iowa and for 
six years conducted a large farm there. At the end 
of the six years, in 1893, he removed to Omaha, 
Neb., to look after the farm and ranch interests of 
himself and his brother, B. F., who had been an 
equal partner with him for many years. B. F. 
came to Rosebud valley, Mont., in 1882, and in 
company with Frank C. Robinson engaged in stock- 
raising on an extensive scale. In 1900 he sold out 
his interest to his brother Wallace, who has since 
made Montana his home, and is now interested m 
two additional large ranches in company with his 
son. Lew W. Carpenter, the immediate suliject of 
this narrative. 

Mr. Carpenter, our immediate subject, attended 
the district schools at State Center, Iowa, until he 
was twelve years old, after which he spent two 
years at the Shattuck Military School at Faribault, 
Minn. On leaving this institution in the summer 
of 1878 he removed to the ranch of Carpenter & 
Robinson, in northern Nebraska, and remained 
there four years, leaving in 1882 to bring 2,000 head 
of cattle to Montana. Arriving in this state he 
located on a ranch of 2,000 acres in Rosebud valley, 
thirty-two miles from the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road. Later, as has been noted, his father became 
interested with him in this ranch and another com- 
prising about 6,000 acres, situated ten miles farther 
up the valley, which they purchased, the two con- 
trolling three miles and a half of the Rosebud bot- 
tom land, which produces ample crops of hay for 
their herds of cattle and horses rangmg on the sur- 
rounding prairfes enclosed by many miles of fence. 
On these ranches they make a specialty of thor- 
oughbred Durham cattle and high-grade horses, 
and carry on a very profitable business. 

Tn politics Mr. Carpenter is a Republican, an*l 
lakes nnich interest in the success of his party. He 
was its candidate for representative of Custer coun- 
ty in the fall of 1900, but wa.-> defeated by the oppo- 
sition of the Miles City people with whom he did 



not agree on the question of dividing the county. 
He has been postmaster at Lee, his home office, since 
1896. On December 23, 1892, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Annie Gaflfney, daughter of 
Hugh Gafifney, who came to Montana in 1883 and 
located on Lame Deer creek. The marriage was sol- 
emnized at Rosebud, and has resulted in the birth of 
five children, namely. Vera, Wallace, Lon, Jessie 
and IMarion. Mrs. Carpenter is a woman of a reso- 
lute and courageous nature, and on one occasion 
gave convincing proof of the fact. During the 
Cheyenne Indian outbreak of 1890, she, then a mere 
girl, .was alone in the house when eight hostile sav- 
ages made their appearance bent on mischief, bui 
she held them at bay with a Winchester rifle until 
.she was rescued by a squad of soldiers from the 
fort. 



EDWIN C. CARTER.— Upon a handsome, 
well-equipped ranch of 540 acres of land, lo- 
cated two miles west of Wolf creek, Lewis and 
Clarke county, resides Edwin C. Carter. He was 
born in Nova Scotia, Canada, on October 22, 1850. 
His parents are George and Jane Carter, the moth- 
er a native of Canada and the father of England. 
They were even while residents of Canada a family 
of agriculturists, and coming to Montana in 1882, 
they now reside on a ranch two and one-half 
miles west of Wolf creek. George Carter is a 
member of the Democratic party, in whose welfare 
he at all times manifests a lively interest. The 
scholastic advantages of Edwin C. Carter were 
by no means extensive, for at the age of nine 
years he was actively engaged in farm work at 
the munificent wages of $5 per month and board. 
At this place and price, however, he continued but 
one year, yet he was employed in various agricul- 
tural pursuits until he was sixteen. He then en- 
gaged in lumbering with wages averaging from $1.60 
to $2.00 per day. This vocation he continued until he 
was thirty years old. In 1879 he came to Montana 
and located at Wolf creek where for several months 
he found employment in the canyon. Subsequent- 
ly and for three years he followed lumbering for 
Robert Ellis. For his services he received $50 a 
month and board. But he was ambitious and not 
content to work for other people. Accordingly 
he purchased an interest in a sawmill which he 
continued successfully for five years. Disposing of 
his interest ift the sawmill he turned his attention 
to ranching at the place where he now resides and 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1019 



where he has built up a profitable industr3\ He 
has a homestead claim of 160 acres, to which he 
has added 381 acres of railroad land. He has 
made a specialty of stockraising. On January 22, 
1883, Mr. Carter was married to Miss Belle Bur- 
gess, a native of Nova Scotia. She is the daugh- 
ter of Charles and Hannah Burgess, also of Can- 
ada. Her father was a" farmer, in which vocation 
he met fair success. Her parents were members 
of the Baptist church, and her mother died on 
August 27, 1898. Mr. and Mrs. Carter have two 
children, Bessie A. and Mary B. Mrs. Carter is 
a member of the Baptist church. 



pHARLES L. CARTHRAE, who is well known 
V.' throughout the state as a successful rancher 
and one of the best judges of cattle in Montana, 
is located on a handsome ranch of nearlv 1,500 
acres, near Geyser, and twent3'-four miles south- 
east of Belt. Practically the greater portion of his 
successful career has been passed in connection with 
the cattle interests in Montana and adjoining states 
and territories. He was born in Saline county. 
Mo., March 18, 1856, the son of Addison and Syd- 
ney Carthrae, natives of Albemarle county, Ya. 
The family removed to Missouri in 1840, where the 
father successfully followed the career of a farmer. 
An active and influential Republican since the or- 
organization of that party, he for many years served 
as administrator in Missouri. Fraternally he was a 
member of the Masonic order ; in religion a member 
of the Baptist church. He died in 1865 and was 
followed by his wife, the mother of our subject, in 
1883. They are survived by nine children, viz ; 
Sallie, Charles L., Susan, Anna, Sophie, May, Ad- 
dison F., Terry and Ethel. 

Charles L. Carthrae has made the best of his 
limited education, and has improved all his oppor- 
tunities since leaving the public schools wherein he 
received it. At the early age of nine years he fol- 
lowed the plow on his father's farm, and from the 
habits of industry formed in the days of boyhood 
he has never departed. Until he was eighteen years 
old he remained with his parents, but in 1874 he re- 
moved to Colorado where he first engaged in the 
cattle business that was destined to form so prom- 
inent a feature in his later career. Having com- 
pleted his initial "round-up" he went to Wyoming 
and devoted the following season to the same line 
of employment. Later he removed to Utah and se- 



cured employment driving a band of horses to 
Red Rock, Idaho ; subsequently going to Sheridan 
and taking a position on a hay ranch at a salary of 
$65 per month, being in the employment of A. F. 
Freeley. His next engagement was with the firm 
of I. G. Baker & Co., as their representative, and 
with whom he remained eighteen months. Follow- 
ing this he passed two years' time on the Shonkin 
round-up, receiving $50 a month, and subsequently 
he was in the employment of A. and Daniel Samples. 
The reputation of Mr. Carthrae as an excellent 
judge of cattle was now fully established, and he 
subsequently worked in the interest of Sample & 
Power, making two trips for that firm, and after- 
ward entering the employment of T. C. Power, with 
whom he remained two years. The nine succeed- 
ing years were passed with the firm of Hobson & 
Power in the Judith basin round-up, at a salary of 
$70 per month. 

But the time had arrived when he made up his 
mind to work for himself and apply his knowledge 
of the cattle business to his own individual interests. 
He secured the first portion of his present rancn, 
twenty-four miles southeast of Belt, Cascade county, 
to which he has added from time to time until he 
now has a fine range of about 1500 acres devoted to 
cattleraising, his principal source of income. His 
marriage to Miss Lena M. Berges, of La Harpe, 
Hancock county, 111., occurred December 14, 1891. 
She is the daughter of Hiram G. and Nora C. 
Berges, the mother a native of Ireland and the 
father of Germany. The father was engaged in 
the grocery business and died in 1877. Both pa^"- 
ents were members of the Catholic church. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Carthrae is a member of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and politically a Demo- 
crat of the old school. 



TOHN K. CASTNER, of Belt, Cascade county, 
J is the pioneer of that district and a most 
estimable and worthy citizen. The title bestowed 
on him of "the father of Belt," is no misnomer, for 
he has played a prominent part in the making of 
the town and in the development of the surround- 
ing country. He was born in Washington county, 
Pa., on September 22, 1844, the son of Daniel and 
Rebecca Castner, also Pennsylvanians. His 
father was in early life a farmer, but later he was 
interested in mining and an owner of boats en- 
gaged in the transfer of coal. Both himself and 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



his wife were devout members of the Presbyterian 
church, the father dying m 1874 and the mother in 
1896. John K. Castner received an education at 
the public schools of Columbia, Pa., and added to 
this the practical knowledge obtained at a leading 
business college of Pittsburg, and during his sum- 
mer vacations he pasred his time profitably in the 
boatyards of his immediate vicinity. 

The discovery of petroleum gave a new impulse 
to the business of the state, and in 1865 Mr. Cast- 
ner went to Oil City and secured work at $3.50 per 
day. He was a thrifty young man, saved his earn- 
ings for two years, purchased a flatboat and en- 
gaged in very profitable freighting on Oil creek 
and the Allegheny river. In 1867 Mr. Castner 
came to Montana, attracted by the news of its 
numerous rich gold discoveries. He arrived at 
Fort Benton by the Missouri river in September, 
and his first employment was watching freight at 
Cow island for $2.00 per night. During the fall 
and winter he drove a freight team from Cow 
island for the Diamond R Company, receiving $75 
per month and board. In the winter of 1867-8 he 
was hunting in the Sun river valley, and the next 
summer he was engaged with Joseph Largent in 
freighting, continuing this business until 1870. 

Later he fenced government land, bought a 
small herd of cattle and soon after traded this for 
a house and lot at Fort Benton, afterward ex- 
changing this property for a pair of mules with 
which he engaged in freighting between the fort 
and Helena. To this equipment he added until 
he had three good ten-mule teams, the gradual 
accumulation of a successful business. In the 
meantime Mr. Castner experimented in a few min- 
ing ventures, but none of them was profitable. In 
1877 he came to Belt. He was the pioneer settler 
and he labored long in prospecting for and in de- 
veloping a paying coal mine, overcoming obstacles 
that to men of less force of character would have 
been deterrent. He persevered and was success- 
ful, organizing the Castner Coal Company, the 
germ of the town. In 1894 the mine passed to the 
Anaconda Coal Mining Company. During the 
past twenty years Mr. Castner has been a leader 
in all ways. His house was the popular hotel, its 
character being still maintained by Mrs. Castner, 
and he has conducted a large real estate and in- 
surance business. In 1879 he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mattie Bost, a native of North 
Carolina. They have a son, Albert. Fraternally 
Mr. Castner is an Odd Fellow and is the present 



noble grand of Coal Valley Lodge No. 54, of Belt. 
He belongs also to the Improved Order of Red 
Men and the Maccabees. Politically he is a Re- 
publican, and a valuable factor in the councils and 
official stations of the party. By diligent study 
Mr. Castner has so thoroughly informed himself 
in geology, mineralogy and kindred sciences as to 
be an accepted authority. ' 



A LEXANDER CHAMBERS, one of the lead- 
i 1 ing stockmen and general ranchers of Cas- 
cade county, is located on a range of 1,360 acres 
near Kibbey, twenty-seven miles south of Belt. A 
native of Ireland, he has been afiforded ample facil- 
ities to contrast the advantages of the northwest 
with those of the Emerald Isle. Although not 
one of Montana's earliest pioneers he has been 
prosperous and successful since his advent into 
Cascade county, and has seen no reason to regret 
his choice of location. He was born in County 
Down, Ireland, in August, 1831, the son of Joseph 
and Susan Chambers, also natives of Ireland. 
Joseph Chambers was a linen manufacturer and a 
soHd farmer. The mother died in 1847 ^"d six 
}ears later was followed by her husband. They 
were members of the Presbyterian church. Of 
their five children only Charles and Alexander sur- 
\ive them. 

While the common schools of Ireland in the 
days of our subject's youth were not all that could 
be desired in the way of educational institutions it 
was in them that he received his limited advantages 
in scholastic training. At the age of fifteen his 
assistance was required by his parents on the farm, 
and with them he remained until he reached his 
majority. His father died about this time, and he 
then lived with an uncle for three years. At the 
end of that time he returned to his father's farm, 
which was held in the family on a perpetual lease 
dating back to 1680, and here remained until he 
came to the United States, in 1887. His initial 
location was at Minot, N. D., where he passed ojie 
winter and removed in the spring of 1888 to Great 
Falls, Cascade county, at that period just begin- 
ning to come into some prominence. Within a 
few months he had located a homestead, the nu- 
cleus of his present fine ranch, and to which he has 
since added 1,200 acres, devoting his attention to 
cattleraising with success. Nearly a hundred 
acres of this property is under cultivation. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



The marriage of Mr. Chambers occurred June 
ID, 1856, when he was united to Miss EHza Cham- 
bers, a native of Ireland, and daughter of Fergus 
and Mary Chambers. The father was engaged in 
fanning, and also in the manufacture of linen. 
They were devout and consistent members of the 
Presbyterian church, the father dying in 1882, and 
the mother in 1870. To Mr. and Mrs. Chambers 
have been born ten children, two of whom passed 
away in infancy. The living are Joseph, James, 
Samuel, Alexander, Jr., John, David, Minnie and 
Annie. The parents are Presbyterians ; politically 
Mr. Chambers is a Democrat. 



RS. CHAPPELL.— The scion of an old Welch 
family, whose name is honorably linked with 
history of that country, R. S. Chappell inherits 
from his ancestors traits of sturdy endurance, pro- 
ductive industry and self-reliance, that have well 
fitted him for the exacting life of a western fron- 
tiersman. He was born at Greenville, 111., on 
June 6, 1858, the son of Wesley and Miriam 
(Henry) Chappel, the former of North Carolina 
and the latter of Illinois. The grandfather, Rob- 
ert Chappell, was a native of Wales, and emigrated 
from that country to North Carolina when he was 
a young man, and there became a planter. He 
removed to Tennessee and a short time later died 
there. His widow soon after removed with her 
young family to Illinois, arriving when the father 
of our subject was a boy. She there took up land 
on which his mother now resides at the age of 
seventy-three. R. S. Chappell was the second of 
eleven children. He remained on the homestead 
until 1875, and then removed to California, mak- 
ing the last 200 miles of the journc}' by stage. He 
remained in the state three years, and then, upon 
the death of his father, returned to Illinois to as- 
sist his mother; but after passing one year with 
her, he joined the Leadville stampede. He re- 
mained at Leadville one year, engaged in mill- 
ing, and at its close came across to Montana by 
wagon train, arriving on the Yellowstone on 
June 19, 1880, and stopping at Rapids. In the 
fall he went to the Gallatin valley and bought a 
drove of cattle with which he returned to 
the Yellowstone, where, in addition to attend- 
ing his cattle, he gave considerable time to hunt- 
ing, and in this was very successful. In 1881 he 
sold his cattle and engaged in butchering, fui- 



nishing meat to the persons connected with the 
construction of the railroad and others. At the 
end of the 3ear he abandoned this enterprise and be- 
gan cow punching and freighting, which he con- 
tinued until 1886. Then in company with another 
person, be bought a flock of 2,000 sheep which they 
brought to Red Lodge, then a part of the Crow 
reservation, this being one of the first flocks 
brought into what is now Carbon county. They 
had a bad winter and the sheep venture was so 
disastrous that they were obliged to go to freight- 
ing again in the spring. Mr. Chappell continued 
at the business until the fall of 1890, when, in com- 
pany with John Weir, he took a flock of sheep on 
shares, and continued the enterprise until 1895. 
They then divided the sheep and Mr. Chappell 
located on his present property, known as Stanley 
creek, situated three miles northeast of Roberts. 
He is a successful and representative sheep man, 
and has the confidence of all who are engaged in 
the business. His favorite brand of sheep is the 
Merino, of which he has an average of 6,000 or 
7,000. 

In politics Mr. Chappell is Republican, and as 
such was the nominee for sheriff of the county, 
but failed of election although making a good 
showing at the polls, was defeated by John Dunn, 
the Democrat candidate. 



HANK CHAPMAN.— Born at Canyonville, 
Douglas county, Oregon, reared and edu- 
cated within the borders of the state and having 
conducted his business operations throughout life 
in the west, Mr. Chapman is distinctively a western 
product and has typified in his character and 
career the sterling qualities of manly vigor and 
business capacity which distinguish men of the 
west. His life began October 15, 1856, a son of 
Addison and Susan (Shuey) Chapman, the former 
a native of Illinois and the latter of Pennsylvania. 
The father was a farmer in Illinois, Iowa and Ore- 
gon, and died at Canyonville in 1865. His widow 
is now living at Red Lodge, Mont. Mr. Chapman 
attended the schools of his native town until he 
was fifteen years old, and then, in 1871, went to 
Fort Klamath, where he remained one summer. 
From there he went to Plarney, in Grant county, 
and engaged in the cattle business, which he con- 
tinued in Harney valley and eastern Oregon un- 
til 1881. In that year he collected horses in Ore- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



gon and cattle in Gallatin valley, Mont., and took 
them to Trail creek, Wyo., where he secured a 
ranch of 960 acres, with headquarters on Patohair 
creek. .In addition to handling horses and cattle 
he engaged largely in sheepraising, and continued 
the business in that state until 1896, when he re- 
moved to Red Lodge creek, Mont., where he has a 
320-acre ranch devoted to raising cattle and farm- 
ing. 

In politics Mr. Chapman is a stanch Republican, 
and takes a constant and active interest in political 
affairs. He is a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, belonging to the organization 
at Red Lodge, in which he shows an active and 
serviceable interest. He was married at Red 
Lodge in 1896, to Miss Carrie Clarke, a native of 
Unity, Me. They have one child, Andy, aged 
three years. 



q^HOMAS J. CHESTNUT, at present postmas- 
1 ter of Clancey, Jefferson county, Mont., has 
had an eventful and adventurous career in the state 
and territory. He has achieved prosperity and in 
doing this he has overcome obstacles that would 
have discouraged if not defeated a less determined 
character. He was born at Royal Oak, Oakland 
county, Mich., on March 6, 1855, the son of Benja- 
min Chestnut, who, when sixteen, came from Ire- 
land to the United States and settled in Michigan, 
where he married and raised eleven children. 
Thomas J. Chestnut, on attaining his majority, in 
1878, removed to Montana, and engaged in sup- 
plying wood to the steamers along the Missouri 
river. The cabin he occupied was used as a fort, 
for during 1879 and 1880 the Sioux Indians were 
quite annoying, and in such fear were the settlers 
that as soon as a Sioux appeared in his paint and 
feathers a rush for the cabin ensued. No one had 
the hardihood to advance far from this one place 
of comparative security without his rifle, and 
many shots were exchanged between the settlers 
and the red skins, and the party had a number of 
horses stolen by the Indians while several attempts 
were made to rob their cabin. 

On one of its trips the steamer Penina arrived at 
the mouth of Poplar creek and some one on the 
boat sold rum to the Indians. This being a crim- 
inal ofifense, the United States marshal came to 
arrest the offender. Mr. Chestnut offered to as- 
sist him ; his services were accepted, and the boat 
was seized in due form. But it is one thing to 



capture a steamboat and quite another to retain it. 
At night the captain ordered the lines cast off, and 
soon the Penina was under full steam, heading 
down stream. The marshal had captured the boat 
and now the boat had captured the marshal and 
Mr. Chestnut. After a few days' riding on the 
runaway steamer, the marshal and Mr. Chestnut 
were put ashore, and were obliged to make their 
homeward journey through a wilderness country 
and with many deprivations. From the effects of 
this trip Mr. Chestnut contracted mountain fever 
and it was four years before he recovered suf- 
ficiently to sign his name. 

Mr. Chestnut passed the days of his illness and 
convalescence in the east. On his recovery he re- 
turned to Montana and settled at Ridgelawn, Daw- 
son county, on the Yellowstone river, where he re- 
mained eight years profitably engaged in ranch- . 
ing. During the last two years he served as post- 
master and also had for one year the government 
contract for supplying beef to the troops at Fort 
Buford. In 1895 he removed to Clancey, his pres- 
ent residence. Here he engaged in merchandising 
in which he has been successful and prosperous. 
In 1897 he was appointed postmaster of Clancey 
by President McKinley, and he is still most capably 
and courteously filling that position. In 1881 Mr. 
Chestnut was married, at Glendive, Mont., to Miss 
Wilhelmina Brown, a native of Illinois. They 
have had three children, Floyd and Lloyd, twins, 
one deceased, and Lida K. Politically Mr. Chest- 
nut is a stanch Republican and an influential work- 
er in behalf of that party. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Odd Fellows. In the community 
in which he resides he is highly esteemed. The 
bravery and resolute courage of our subject was 
more than once displayed during the tumultuous 
scenes of earlv territorial davs. 



JOHN CILANDER, one of the progressive and 
successful ranchmen and stockraisers of Car- 
bon county, is a native of Sweden, where he was 
born September, 1840, a son of Anderson Cilander, 
who was a large landowner and prosperous farmer 
in that country. His son John passed his school 
days in his native land, remaining on the home- 
stead until 1870, when he came to the LTnited 
States. After remaining a year in Iowa, where he 
had a sister living, he went to St. Louis and passed 
six years in the employ of the Chicago & Rock 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1023 



Island Railroad. From there he went to Mani- 
toba and remained four years, engaged in store- 
keeping and the hotel business. He was very suc- 
cessful at the start, but owing to the failure of a 
contractor he lost $2,600 and had but little left. 
He then came to Montana, and after remaining a 
short time near where the town of Billings now 
stands, took up land on the Musselshell and started 
in the stock business with a few head of cattle. 
He remained there two years and, his land being 
claimed by the railroad company, then located on 
the Yellowstone, ten miles below Billings, where 
he passed two years as a tenant, and then engaged 
in cattleraising twenty-eight miles north of Bill- 
ings. In 1897 he removed to his present ranch, 
four miles northeast of Gebo, having sold his cattle 
and retained his sheep, of which he has about 
5,000. 

Mr. Cilander was married in September, 1877, 
to Miss Bertie Johnson, a native of Iceland. She 
came to America with her mother, who is still liv- 
ing with her. Mr. and Mrs. Cilander have four 
children : Charles, Salma, Jennie and Nellie. 
Their home is one of the most attractive in the 
county. The ranch contains 500 acres, and is im- 
proved with a comfortable two-story house which 
has recently been erected. The land is partially 
irrigated, and when a new ditch now under con- 
tract is completed, Mr. Cilander is to have 400 
inches of water out of it, which will enable him to 
irrigate the entire tract. His crops of hay and 
oats are large and of excellent quality. He is a 
skillful farmer, and appHes to his business the in- 
telligence acquired by reading and observation, 
being up to date in every way. He is a highly re- 
spected citizen, and is much esteemed as a neigh- 
bor and friend by a large circle of acquaintances. 



WILLIAM CHOISSER.— Descended from dis- 
tinguished French ancestry, William Chois- 
ser, of Forsyth, was born at Raleigh, Saline county, 
111., October 31, 1837, and was there reared and 
educated. His father, William, was a native of 
Illinois and a farmer, and his grandfather of 
France. In 1864 William removed to Minnesota, 
but in 1868 returned to Illinois and there engaged 
in farming until 1885, when he came to Montana, 
locating at Miles City, and the next spring took 
lip a homestead in the Rosebud valley twelve miles 
from Forsyth, which has since been his home. To 



the original tract of 160 acres he has added 320 in 
the valley and 680 of adjoining bench lands, all of 
which is devoted to farming and stockraising, both 
cattle and horses. From 1886 to 1898 Mr. 
Choisser was engaged in freighting. From 1890 
to 1898 he and his son, E. E. Choisser, had the 
government contract to run a stage from Rosebud 
to Lame Deer and the government freight con- 
tract from Rosebud to Muddy on the Cheyenne 
reservation. 

In politics Mr. Choisser is a Republican. He 
was appointed assessor for the new county of 
Rosebud in March, 1901. In 1863, at Raleigh, III, 
he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Jane 
Provine, who was born at Sumerville, Tenn., in 
184:2. They have four daughters and three sons: 
Mrs. C. B. Tabor, who lives at Forsyth ; Joseph 
E. Choisser, of Forsyth, who was married at Miles 
City September 25, 1901, to Miss Florence Gilli- 
land, a native of Nebraska ; E. E., who has been as- 
sociated with his father in business since 1885 ; 
W. E., who lives on the home ranch ; Mrs. George 
S. Mendenhall, who lives at Rosebud, and Luella 
Dimples and Gladys Etoile, who are living at 
home. 



pHARLES B. CLARK.— Through many vicis- 
V, situdes and reverses, through disappointments 
and hopes deferred, through privations and hard- 
ships of magnitude, in all of which he maintained 
a cheerful demeanor and a superb nerve, the pleas- 
ing subject of this sketch has come to his present 
condition of consequence and comfort in life. He 
is a native of Henderson, Sibley county, Minn., 
where he was born August 31, 1856, his parents be- 
ing John A. and Sarah (Butler) Clark, natives of 
Ohio, whence they removed to Illinois, spending 
some time in Jo Daviess county. From there they 
went to Henry county, Iowa, and returned later to 
Galena, 111., during the lead mining excitement at 
that place. There the father engaged in lead min- 
ing for a period of five or six years, and then the 
family removed to St. Paul, Minn. This was in 
the year 1846, and they remained at St. Paul until 
the spring of 1852, when they settled in Hender- 
son, being pioneers in that section. Here he re- 
mained until his death, which occurred in 1857. 
after a career of prominence and usefulness in mer- 
cantile and public life in the community. He suc- 
cessfully conducted a large general store, and as a 
public-spirited citizen took a prominent and act- 



1024 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



ive part in all matters affecting the welfare of his 
town and county. He served as sheriff and in 
many other official capacities, and won from all 
classes high commendation for the manner in 
which he administered every trust committed to 
his care. 

His son Charles, our immediate subject, spent 
his school days in his native town, remainmg there 
until 1866, when he was ten years old. At that 
time he removed with the family to Litchfield, 
where they remained until 1873. He then joined 
the Stanley expedition, engaged in running the 
first lines of the Northern Pacific Railroad, em- 
ployed with the surveyors. That same year he 
made his first entrance into Montana, and re- 
mained within the limits of the territory until the 
expedition disbanded a few months later, when he 
went to Bismarck, N. D., and in the fall of 1876 
joined the stampede to the Black Hills, where 
he spent the next four years mining and freighting, 
but with indifferent success. In the spring of 
1880 he came up the Yellowstone to Bozeman, 
going to Helena in the fall and engaging in the 
sawmilling business with Holter Brothers. He 
remained in that vicinity until 1888, during which 
time he located the Jerusha copper mine at Em- 
pire, which he and John 'Gleason, commonly called 
"Deaf John," developed. After taking out about 
$50,000 worth of metal Mr. Clark sold his inter- 
est to A. J. Seligman. He then went to Butte, 
where he leased and worked mines with a fair de- 
gree of success. In 1893 he gave up mining and 
located his present property, being brought into 
the neighborhood by reports of the good placer 
ground there abounding. Liking the climate he 
settled on a ranch on Clark's Fork, fifteen miles 
east of Red Lodge, at the mouth of Bear creek, 
where he now has one of the finest ranch resi- 
dences in the state, with every improvement for 
successfully conducting his business known to the 
trade. 

In April, 1893, Mr. Clark was married to Miss 
Mary Barkley, a native of Shakopee, Minn., a 
daughter of John Barkley. Mr. and Mrs. Clark 
have no children except an adopted daughter 
named Ruth. Mr. Clark is a great cattleraiser, and 
is an acknowledged authority on the subject. He 
is decidedly of the opinion that Herefords are best 
adapted to the section in which he lives, and con- 
sequently makes a specialty of that breed, having 
as many as 500 head until recently, when he sold 
off most of them, intending to retire for a time 



from active work and travel. In fraternal rela- 
tions he is allied with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the order of Elks. He is well known 
throughout his own and adjoining counties, and 
stands high in the good opinion and esteem of all 
classes of the people. 



HUBERT ALPHONSE MILOT.— The scenes 
and incidents of pioneer life on the Montana 
frontier are thoroughly familiar to Mr. Milot, 
who has maintained his home in this section of 
the Union for fully forty years, and is now residing 
in the capital city, giving his attention to various 
business interests. Mr. Milot is a native of 
Yamachiche, province of Quebec, Canada, born 
December 24, 1837, the son of Francois and Cath- 
erine (Hubert) Milot, the former a native of the 
same province, where he was engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits until his death, and where his wife 
also passed her entire life. Hubert A. Milot was 
educated in the Christian Brothers' school in his 
native parish, and on abandoning his studies in 
1853 he secured a clerkship in a general store. On 
April 27, 1857, he left Canada for St. Louis, Mo., 
where he arrived the following month, and was 
employed in a mercantile establishment until 1861, 
when he proceeded to St. Joseph, the great outfit- 
ting point for freighters over the plains. On May 
9, 1861, he joined the party of L. R. Maillette and 
others, and started for Deer Lodge, Mont. The 
train consisted of but four teams, with six oxen in 
each, three families making up the company. j\Ir. 
Milot did cooking for the privilege of accompany- 
ing the train, and his lot was no sinecure, since he 
he was compelled to walk all day and to cook dur- 
ing a goodly portion of the night. The first night 
out the party camped on a hillside, Mr. Milot mak- 
ing his bed under one of the wagons and in a gully. 
His choice of sleeping quarters proved rather un- 
fortunate, as a severe rain storm sent the water 
down the gully and washed out his bed and practi- 
cally himself. The party followed the route to 
Green river, at which point our subject left the 
others and joined his cousin, whom he met by ac- 
cident, and the two proceeded to Deer Lodge, 
where they arrived on November 9, 1861. In 
Pleasant valley the party encountered a band of 
Nez Perce Indians, who stole some of their best 
horses and escaped with them. While on the trail 
between Snake river and Ross Fork, in Montana, 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



they encountered three famiHes who had lost their 
trail; they joined the party of which Mr. Alilot was 
a member, and thus made their way to Deer Lodge, 
in which place our subject stayed with the Demars 
family and assisted in the care of stock. In the 
spring of 1862 he went to Elk City, where he was 
engaged in driving cattle until October ; thence to 
Bannack, where he started in as a herder of cattle, 
having cattle and horses of his own and also 
looking after stock owned by others. In Decem- 
ber the Indians swooped down in large numbers 
and drove off the entire herd, whereupon Mr. Milot 
went into Bannack and engaged in collecting for 
various concerns and other employment until July, 
1863, when he went to Virginia City, engaged in 
the liquor business, but sold out in the fall and re- 
turned to Deer Lodge. In the spring, after the 
vigilantes had hung William Bunton, his partners, 
Messrs. Cook and Campbell, did not care to remain 
longer in the locality, and Mr. Milot purchased 
their interests in the liquor business and remained 
there until the fall of 1865, when he went to the 
crossing of Little Deer Lodge creek, just half way 
between German gulch and Silver Bow, the place 
being now known as Milot station, and there en- 
gaged in general merchandising and in the raising 
of horses until the fall of 1870, when he took up 
his abode on a ranch in the Deer Lodge valley. 
In the following year he visited his old home in 
Canada, where he was married and then returned 
to his ranch, where he and his wife made their 
home until 1874, when he purchased another ranch, 
three miles from the city of Deer Lodge, and lo- 
cated thereon. 

In 1876 he removed to Lewis and Clarke county, 
located at Dearborn crossing, between Fort Ben- 
ton and Helena, and assumed charge of the Dear- 
born house. At the expiration of two years Mr. 
Milot removed tjo Sun river crossing, where he 
conducted a general store about eighteen months, 
then returned to Dearborn and engaged in the 
same line of business, where he served as post- 
master, notary public and school trustee. In iSgo 
he took up his permanent residence in Helena. 
Here he has been identified with merchandising, 
and has also superintended his interests in other 
parts of the state. He owns considerable property 
within the town site of Castle, owns the hotel prop- 
erty there, now rented. His realty holdings in 
Helena are quite valuable. 

In politics Mr. Milot is a Democrat ; fraternally 
he is an honored member of the Lewis and Clarke 



County Pioneer Society, of which ne is now vice- 
president. Mr. Milot's marriage was solemnized 
in Canada in the year 1871. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Mary LaFleur, was born in 
Montreal, Canada, where she was reared and edu- 
cated. Of this union eleven children have been 
born, the eldest son, Charles, who celebrated his 
twenty-third birthday anniversary on May 12. 
1901, being a successful young business man of 
Helena ; the younger children are attending the 
public schools of the capital city, their names, in 
order of birth being as follows : Mary A. F., Daisy 
E. L. (deceased), Josephine L. O., Charles H. A., 
Arthur O., Leon I., Louis A., Edwidge L., Eus- 
tache O., Aveline N. and Eva A. 



W' ILLIAM H. CODER.— One of the pros- 
perous representatives of the sheep industry 
in Ferg-us county is Mr. Coder. By the time this 
work is issued he will have been a resident of 
Fergus county for twenty years, and within this 
time he has contributed his quota toward the in- 
dustrial development and material progress of this 
section of the state. 

Mr. Coder was born in Stark county, Ohio, on 
the 25th of March, 1838, the son of Charles and 
Sarah (Scott) Coder, the former of whom was 
born in Pennsylvania and the latter in Jersey City, 
N. J. They removed to Ohio early, becoming 
pioneers of that state, and later removed to Ne- 
braska, where they passed the residue of their 
lives, the father's death occurring in 1871, and that 
of his wife in 1869. They were consistent and 
worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. _ Charles Coder was long engaged in the 
foundry and machinist business and was a skilled 
mechanic. During his later years he lived retired 
from active business. He was a Republican from 
the organization of the party. Two of his four chil- 
dren, Curtis and Alonzo, are now dead. Curtis 
Coder was associated with W. H. Coder in his 
ranching and stock business in Fergus county 
until his recent death, and was highly esteemed 
and a successful busmess man. The two living- 
children are William H. and Catherine. 

William H. Coder was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native state and the academy 
at Mount Union, Ohio. He began life for himself 
at the age of seventeen, giving two years time to 
learning the moulder's trade in Ohio. He then 



1026 



FKOGRESSiyE MEN OF MONTANA. 



removed to Dowagiac, Cass county, Mich., where 
he followed his trade for nearly three years. In 
1859 he removed to Kansas, and the next year 
to Nebraska, where he bought and sold horses and 
cattle, later successfully engaged in farming. In 
1861 he located in Falls City, Neb., and continued 
dealing in horses until 1869, when he located in 
Omaha, where he was deputy United States mar- 
shal for four years. In 1S70 he located at Rulo, 
Richardson county, where he was a clerk and man- 
ager of a drug store. In the spring of 1874 he 
came to Cheyenne, Wyo., and soon afterward to 
Fort Laramie, where he was ill in the hospital for 
four months. He was employed then for a time at 
painting and the ensuing eight months he devoted 
to hunting and trapping, realizing $3,000 from this 
enterprise. In the fall of 1875 Mr. Coder went 
to the Black Hills, where he was successfully en- 
gaged in mining for five years. In the spring 
of 1882 he came to his present ranch on Ford's 
creek, eight miles southeast of Fort Maginnis, 
first taking up a homestead, as did also his brother 
Curtis. To their original tracts they added until 
the ranch now has an area of 2,000 acres. After 
the death of his brother Mr. Coder continued 
the business, and his operations are of wide scope. 
In politics Mr. Coder gives his support to the 
Republican party. 



WS. CLARK, postmaster of Parrot, Jefifer- 
son county, Mont., and one of the owners 
of the Gold Hill mine, was born at Red Wing, 
Minn., on July 12, i860. He is the son of W. 
W. and O. S. (Cleveland) Clark. The father was 
a native of New York, and his wife of Ver- 
mont. They married in Minnesota, and before the 
Civil war Mr. Clark was an attorney in active prac- 
tice in that state. In 1861 he enlisted in Company 
A of the Fifth Minnesota. Shortly afterwards 
died at Fort Snelling from typhoid fever, his son, 
W. S. Clark, received his education in the public 
schools of Red Wing and vicinity, and on leav- 
ing school in 1879, went to north Minnesota and 
engaged in farming, in which occupation he con- 
tinued until 1885, when he entered the employ- 
ment of the Northern Pacific, with headquarters 
at Fargo. 

He remained on this road as engineer until 
1895 when he came to Montana. Here for three 
years he had charge of mining engines and in 



1898 he associated himself with the JeiTerson \'al- 
ley Trading Company, taking charge of their ex- 
tensive business in Parrot. In 1896 Mr. Clark 
discovered the Gold Hill mine. This productive 
property has been worked continuously and prof- 
itably from its discovery by Mr. Clark and his 
partners, Pruett and Cutler. Mr. Clark was mar- 
ried on September 24, 1890, to Miss Cecilia Fer- 
gus, daughter of James Fergus, of Michigan. They 
have four children, William Fergus, Cecil Gay- 
lord (the first boy born in Parrot), Mary and 
Eugene. During the past year Mr. Clark has been 
postmaster at Parrot. Fraternally he belongs to 
the United Workmen and the Knights of Pythias. 
By the community in which he resides great con- 
fidence is reposed in Mr. Clark and he is highly es- 
teemed. His life has been a busy and an eventful 
one, and the prosperity he enjoys has been gained 
by business ability and high personal character- 
istics. 



TOHN A. COLLINS, ex-mayor of Great Falls, 
J was born in Ontario, Canada, on September 1 1 . 
1865. His parents were William and Mary A. 
(Lewis) Collins, both natives of Canada. The}' 
were of a family of agriculturalists and passed their 
lives in the Dominion. His grandfather was John 
Collins, a native of Ireland, who came to Canada in 
the 'thirties, followed farming as his occupation 
and died in Canada. John A. Collins and two 
brothers and one sister are the only ones of the 
family residing in Montana. The former was 
reared on a farm and educated in the public schools 
of the place of his nativity. In 1885 he came to 
Anaconda, Mont., and was employed in the Mill 
creek flume, and in the concentrator until 1886. 
He then returned to Canada, where he visited the 
old home for six months, and on his return to this 
state he passed some time in Granite and Deer 
Lodge counties. 

In November, 1887, Mr. Collins first came to 
Great Falls, and secured emplojment on the wagon 
bridge then in construction across the Missouri. 
Later he was engaged by the Silver Smelting Com- 
pany, and following this he worked for the city 
water company. He then entered the employ of 
Hodkiss & Hodkiss, plumbers, and remained with 
them until 1892. Then Mr. Collins began business 
for himself, which he successfully conducted until 
189s, when he engaged in the hard war" trade as 
a member of the firm of Huev & Collins. Later 



PROGKESSIJ'E MEN OF MONTANA. 



1027 



Mr. Huey sold his interest to Mr. W. F. Brown, 
and the firm became Brown & CoUins. The}' 
profitably continued the business until 1899, when 
C. F. Wright, L. W. Cresswell, J. T. Lyons and 
Messrs. Brown & Collins organized the Western 
Hardware Company, with Mr. Collins as president 
and manager of the plumbing department, Mr. 
Brown as treasurer and Mr. Wright as secretary. 
The business is now thoroughly established and 
the company does an extensive trade in Cascade 
county and the adjoining territory. 

i\lr. Collins has always been a Republican, has 
worked diligently and influentially in the interest 
of his party and takes a lively interest in its cam- 
paigns. In 1899 he was elected mayor of Great 
Falls, and showed great capacity, breadth of view 
and a comprehensive grasp of municipal aiifairs 
in his incumbency of the mayoralt}-. Fraternalh- 
he is a member of the Odd Fellows and the Can- 
adian American Society. Of the former organza- 
tion he has passed the chairs, and has been grand 
master of the state. Mr. Collins has never married. 
There are many warm friends of Mr. Collins 
throughout the state, and in the community of his 
home city none stands higher in the estimation of 
the people. Pre-eminently he is a broad-minded, 
progressive, selfmade man of sound judgment and 
rare executive ability. 



'tlj' ALTER S. COLLINS is a pioneer of the state 
VV and a veteran of the war of the Rebellion in 
which he rendered Yeoman service. Since coming 
to Montana Mr. Collins has been intimately con- 
cerned in the industrial development and normal 
]jrogress of the state, has assisted in the organiza- 
tion of every county within its Ijorders and been 
honored as a man of inflexible integrity of purpose 
and strong and sterling individuality. Mr. Collins 
is a native of the good old Hoosier state, having 
been born in Columbia City, Whitley county, Ind., 
on October 13, 1844. His father, Richard Collins, 
was a man of unbending rectitude and strong men- 
tality and was very prominent in public and busi- 
ness aiifairs in Indiana for a long term of years, 
having been a civil engineer by profession. He was 
engaged in mercantile business and was the owner 
of the Columbia City flouring mills. He held for 
sixteen years the position of sheriff of Whitley 
county, and during the Civil war served as provost 
marshal in his home town. He was for man^- vears 



clerk and recorder of the county, was a delegate to 
the national convention which nominated Abraham 
Lincoln for the presidency, and was an active work- 
er in the ranks of the Republican party. His grand- 
father on the paternal side was a, soldier in the Con- 
tinental army during the war of the Revolution. 

Walter S. Collins was reared by his paternal aunt, 
]Miss Eliza Collins, and received his early education 
in the public schools of his native town during the 
dark days of the Civil war. His patriotism was 
made manifest in April, 1861. when, at the age of 
seventeen years, he enlisted as a member of Com- 
pany E, Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
mounted in 1863. Mr. Collins proceeded to the 
front with his regiment and served until the expira- 
tion of his term, in January, 1864, when the regi- 
ment was veteranized and its members re-enlisted 
for service until the close of the war. From that 
time forward they served in the Fourteenth Army 
Corps, commanded by Gen. George H. Thomas. 
Mr. Collins participated in twenty-eight engag^e- 
ments during his long term of service, including a 
number of the most notable conflicts of the war. 
He was wounded at the battle of Shiloh, and for the 
disabilities thereby entailed he now receives a pen- 
sion. He received his honorable discharge at Mn- 
con, Ga., on the 5th of August, 1865, and then re- 
turned to his home in Indiana. After a week's 
visit he went to Bloomington,Ind.,for thepurpose of 
attending the State University, but impaired health, 
largely resultant from his wound, compelled him to 
abandon his studies, and under these conditions 
he decided to seek a change of climate and scene. 
He came to Montana by way of the Missouri river. 
making the trip on the steamer Luella, arriving at 
Fort Benton on October 18, 1865. There he en- 
tered the employ of James Bird, whom he accom- 
panied to Helena. In the spring of the following- 
year Mr. Collins bought a placer claim in Blue 
gulch, and worked the same for three months, with 
fair success. He tlien went to San Francisco, Cal.. 
and in 1867 went out with a government surveying 
party under Gen. Meredith, assisting in the defining 
of state lines and being with the corps for nearly 
two years. In the spring of 1869 :\Ir. Collins went 
to Thompson's gulch, in Meagher county, where 
he became a member of the California Mining Com- 
pany, his associates being John Smith and Samuel 
Alabaugh. The company continued the develop- 
ment of its claims for a period of thirteen years and 
secured good returns. In 1882 Mr. Collins re- 
turned to Montana, entered intd partnership with 



I 028 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



John Grey and engaged in placer mining for two 
years in Pony gulch, near Helena; thereafter lie 
continued to follow placer mining in the vicinity 
of Jefferson City, Helena and Diamond City until 
the spring of 1886, when he went to the Little 
Rockies, where he mined and prospected until Sep- 
tember. He then identified himself with R. A. 
Richey in the mercantile business at Rocky Point. 
Mr. Richey died in 1887, and since that event Mr. 
Collins has been engaged in general merchandis- 
ing, located at various points along the line of the 
Great Northern Railroad, and finally making a per- 
manent location at Dodson, on March i, 1897. He 
has a well equipped store and also acts as post- 
master, the place deriving its trade from a wide 
radius of territory. Mr. Collins has a good ranch 
of 160 acres at Dodson, having taken up the same 
as a homestead in 1899, and the little hamlet is 
located on his land. In politics he has ever been 
an earnest and active support to the Republican 
party; fraternally he is identified with the Knights 
of Pythias at Minot, N. D., having become a mem- 
ber in 1888. On the 27th of November, 1901, in 
Butte City, Mr. Collins was united in marriage to 
Miss Naomi Beatty, who was born in Indiana in 
i860, the daughter of John and Nancy Beatty. 



HON. CHARLES H. CONNER.— This able 
and popular representative of Cascade county 
in the state legislature of Montana, comes from 
sterling Colonial ancestry, and in later genera- 
tions, in both the agnatic and maternal lines, have 
been those concerned in affairs entering promi- 
nently into the history of the nation. Mr. Con- 
ner was born in Waseca county, Minn., on Feb- 
ruary 4, 1867, the son of Elias R. and Sarah 
(Lilly) Conner, the former born in southern In- 
diana, where he was long engaged in agriculture, 
being educated in the public schools of Indiana, 
while the mother was born in West Virginia, her 
father removing to Indiana as an early pioneer 
when she was a child of three years, there becom- 
ing a hunter and scout. Elias R. Conner left In- 
diana in 1854 for Minnesota, where he became 
an Indian interpreter for the government, partici- 
pating in various repulsions of Indian raids, and 
although not present at the massacre perpetrated 
by the hostile Sioux near New Ulm, was in equal 
peril. He was in numerous bloody engagements 
with the savages, sometimes with almost over- 
whelming odds against him. His original Ameri- 



can ancestors located in South Carolina in the 
early Colonial days, and the family has been very 
prominent in Indiana, where Connersville is one 
of the places to perpetuate the family name. Elias 
Conner is now living in Faulk county, S. D., hale 
and hearty with undiminished mental powers at 
the remarkable age of more than ninety years. 

Charles H. Conner remained on the Minne- 
sota homestead until he had attained his legal 
majority, with the advantages of a common school 
education and the invigorating discipline of the 
farm. Upon starting out in Hfe he engaged in 
lumbering until 1896, operating in various states. 
In 1883 he came to South Dakota, thence, in 1889, 
to Oregon, after which he was in Utah, Nevada 
and Washington, finally engaging in mining in 
northern Montana in 1894. Early in 1896 he came 
to Neihart, Cascade county, his present home. 
He is prominently identified with the mining in- 
dustry, having valuable interests and devoting his 
attention to their development and operation. 

Mr. Conner is a stanch supporter of the Demo- 
cratic party, in the gift of which, on the fusion 
ticket, he was elected in 1900 to represent his 
county in the state legislature. He is a man of 
executive force and business ability, and is ably 
representing his constituency in the general assem- 
bly, where he holds membership on several im- 
portant committees, including those on labor, mines 
and mining and federal relations. Fraternally Mr. 
Conner is identified prominently with the Miners' 
Union and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. ■ In the former, the strongest union in the 
state, he served as president for one term, resigning 
when elected for a second, while he also served one 
term as recording, and two terms as financial sec- 
retary. On November 21, 1897, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Conner to Miss Carrie Chant- 
with, a native of Norway, where her father was an 
influential merchant and landowner. She and her 
sisters came to America' to join their brother in 
the Red river valley of Dakota, and her marriage 
to Mr. Conner was celebrated in Great Falls. They 
have two children, Sadie M., who was born 
on October 20, 1898, and Filing C. Conner, born 
on November 26, 1900. 



JOHN F. CONE.— The young man in Montana 
is signally prominent in both business and pub- 
lic affairs, and it is due in large measure to this fact 
that the state has shown so virile a strength and 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1029 



has forged forward with so prodigious strides. 
Among the popular and representative young men 
of Ravalh county is John Francis Cone, clerk of 
the district court at Hamilton, and also city clerk. 

Mr. Cone is a native of California, having been 
born in Oakland, on January 22, 1876, the only 
child of Patrick H. and Jennie Cone, both of 
whom were born in the Emerald Isle, whence 
they emigrated to the United States. They now 
reside in Hamilton, Mont. John F. Cone secured 
his preliminary educational training in the pub- 
lic schools, pursuing his studies in Anaconda, 
Mont., and Seattle, and finally in the high school 
at Missoula. After leaving the high school Mr. 
Cone entered the employ of the Bitter Root De- 
velopment Company, later merged into the Ana- 
conda Copper Mining Company, at Hamilton, be- 
ing engaged in clerical work until 1895, when he 
returned to his native city in California and there 
matriculated in St. Mary's College, where he was 
graduated in the class of 1897. He then came 
again to Hamilton, Mont., and, after being for a 
few months again with his former employers, he 
engaged in business for himself in a cigar and con- 
fectionery store, conducting a successful enterprise 
imtil 1901, when he sold it to assume the duties 
of his official position. He has accumulated some 
valuable real estate in Hamilton, including a good 
store building and a number of eligibly located 
residence lots, and he is one of the public-spirited 
and enthusiastic citizens, believing impHcitly in 
the future progress of his home city and doing 
all in his power to promote its advancement. 

In his political adherency Mr. Cone has ever 
been stanchly arrayed in support of the principles 
and policies of the Republican party, and his inter- 
est in the cause has prompted him to active work 
in connection with local afifairs of a public nature. 
In 1898 he was appointed city clerk of Hamilton, 
and has ever since been in tenure of this office. 
At the election of 1900 he was the Republican 
nominee for clerk of the district court in Ravalli 
county, and it is gratifying to note the fact that he 
carried every precinct in the county, notwith- 
standing that his opponent was placed in can- 
didacy on four different tickets. Mr. Cone 
is rendering most efficient service in this office, 
entering upon its duties in January, 1901. He is 
a general favorite in the community, and this is 
the result of his genial personality and kindliness 
of spirit at all times. Mr. Cone was reared in the 
faith of the Catholic church. 



DENJAMIN B. COOK, the efficient and popular 
U chief of police of Great Falls, has been a resi- 
dent of Montana for more than thirty years and 
conspicuously identified with its industrial activities. 
He is a native of Unity. Maine, where he was born 
on September 7, 1849. His father, Daniel Cook, 
was born in the same county, of English parentage, 
and was a house and ship carpenter. He diedin 
Unity in 1877. The maiden name of his wife was 
Elizabeth T. Hussey, and she passed her entire life 
in Waldo county, dying in Unity in 1900. ^ Mr. 
Cook's maternal grandmother. Bertha Chase, was 
one of the earliest settlers in Maine, removing 
from Massachusetts to the banks of Winnecook 
lake, in Waldo county, and living to the age of 
ninety-nine years. She ^as one of the oldest heirs 
to the famous Chase estate in England, estimated 
at eighteen million dollars, which has been in 
litigation for a full century. 

Benjamin B. Cook was educated in the public 
schools of Unity and Vassalboro, Me., working 
on the old homestead farm during the summer 
months and attending school in the winters. When 
nineteen he secured employment in the plow and 
cultivator factory of his uncle, Thomas Hussey, 
at Unity, and after two years he was engaged as 
clerk in a local store, in 1870 he left Maine and 
came to Gallatin City, Mont., where for a few 
months he was employed in the first flouring mill 
of the territory. He then went to the Diamond 
City mines, where he worked for two years. In 
1873 Mr. Cook, with his brother, Charles W., then 
manager of the McGregor Ditch & Mining Com- 
pany, of Diamond City, and of whom extended men- 
tion is made on another page, engaged in the sheep 
business, bringing a band of sheep from Oregon 
and keeping them one winter in the Gallatin valley, 
and the next year taking them to their ranch of 
320 acres in the Smith river valley. To the orig- 
inal ranch additions have been made, until it has 
now 2,000 acres, and here Mr. Charles W. Cook 
is still engaged in sheepgrowing upon an extensive 
scale, B. F. retiring from the firm in 1881. 

In 1883 Mr. Cook became a member of the firm 
of Cook Brothers & Clark, and engaged in sheep- 
raising in Judith basin, where they had a ranch of 
1.000 acres, and ran an average of 5,000 sheep. Mr. 
Cook continued with the firm until 1895, but in 
1892 he had established a furniture and an un- 
dertaking business at Neihart, conducting business 
there for two years and then removing to Great 
Falls, where he associated with his nephew, Wil- 



I030 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Ham Cook, in conducting an undertaking business 
for tliree years. From 1897 until 1900 he was not 
in active business, and in May, 1900, he was ap- 
pointed to his present office of chief of police of 
Great Falls, for which he was peculiarly eligible. 
His administration has been characterized by ef- 
fective discipline and service, while he is popular 
with his subordinates and with the public whose 
interests he serves. Mr. Cook has interests in rich 
silver mines at Xeihart. In politics he gives an 
unswerving allegiance to the Republican party, and 
fraternally is a member of the lodge and chapter 
of the Masonic order, holding membership at Unity, 
Maiiie, while he is also a member of the com- 
mandery in Great Falls. He is an Odd Fellow, 
his lodge membership alsq being in his native town. 
At Fort Benton, Mont., in 1878, Mr. Cook was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Berry, daugh- 
ter of Stillman Berry, a farmer of Waldo county, 
Maine. Their only child, Harold, is nineteen years 
of age. 



FRANK COOMBS.— One of the alert and suc- 
cessful business men of Great Falls whose oper- 
ations have had important influence upon the sub- 
stantial upbuilding of the city, is Frank Coombs, 
and he has attained his success entirely through in- 
dividual effort, without fortuitous aid or influence. 
He is a native of Brooklyn, N. Y., born on April 26, 
1850. His English parents came to the United 
States where the father engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness in Brooklyn, where both he and his wife died 
when Frank was but a mere child. He attended 
the public schools until he was ten years old. when 
he went to Goshen, Ind., and for about three years 
lived on the farm of David Radebaugh, doing chores 
and attending school as occasion permitted. He was 
not yet fourteen when he gave evidence of his pa- 
triotism, in January, 1864, by enlisting as a private 
in Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth 
Indiana Infantry. He was in active service until 
victory crowned the Union arms, receiving his hon- 
orable discharge in June, 1865, and standing as 
one of the most youthful veterans of the great Civd 
war. He accompanied Gen. Sherman to Atlanta, 
participating in the siege of that city, and later 
was with Gen. Thomas at Nashville, Chattanooga, 
and in other historic battles, participating in eleven 
different engagements and receiving a flesh wound 
in t'''^ Ifft thicrh at the battle of Resaca. 

After the war Mr. Coombs returned to Brook- 



lyn for a year, going thence, in 1867, to Wilkes- 
barre. Pa., where he served a three-years appren- 
ticeship at the brickmason's trade, becoming a 
skilled artisan. In the fall of 1874 he located in 
San Francisco, Cal., where he found lucrative em- 
ployment as a foreman brickmason, working on 
such important buildings as the Palace hotel, the 
hall of records and others of semi-public order. 
He finally took charge of the brick work for the 
San Francisco Real Estate Association, which was 
then building a house every day. This incumbency 
he retained for a year, after which he made his way 
to ^Montana, arriving at Fort Benton on July 30, 
1877, and being there engaged in contracting and 
building for about a decade, locating in Great Falls 
in 1887 and here engaging in the same business. 
In 1891 he established the Sun Brick Company, and 
began manufacturing brick. In 1897 T. C. King 
became his partner in this enterprise, which is now- 
conducted as the Electric Brick Works, all the 
power being supplied by electricity. The capacity 
of the kilns is 40,000 per day, and the works are 
running to full capacity all of the year. Mr. Coombs 
has erected a large number of the most ornate and 
substantial buildings in Great Falls, notable among 
them are the Cory building. Security Bank, the 
Dunn block, Todd building, opera house, the Whit- 
ney school building, the Nathan block, the Colliiis 
& Lipley block, the Milwaukee beer hall, addition 
to Grand Hotel, annex to Park Hotel, the Columbus 
Hospital, the Miller & Boa'rdman block, the Minot 
building, the Kingsbury block, David Wilson's 
building. Tribune building, and the Hickory, the 
Luther and the ]\Iurphy-McClay buildings, besides 
others of important character, including some of the 
most attractive residences. 

In politics Mr. Coombs has taken an active part 
in promoting the cause of the Republican party. 
He served as alderman of Fort Benton after the 
city organization was effected, and has been a can- 
didate for other offices of distinctive trust, suffer- 
ing the defeat that attended the ticket of the mi- 
nority party. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Freemasons, in which he is a member of Sheanden 
Post Commandery No. 14, while he is also a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
the Grand Army of the Republic. Mr. Coomljs 
enjoys an unmistakable popularity and is recog- 
nized as one of the city's progressive and influential 
business men. His record of accomplishment stands 
greatly to his credit, and establishes the fact that he 
is a man of marked sagacity and executive force. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1031 



In November. 1885, Mr. Coombs was united in 
marriage to Miss Laura iMartin, of Arlington, Pa., 
and they have one daughter, Pearl, born on October 
6, 1886. The family home is an elegant mansion on 
Third avenue, north, and here a gracious hospitality 
is dispensed. 



OLIVER C. COOPER.— One of the most pro- 
gressive, enterprising and farseeing business 
men of Montana, Oliver C. Cooper, now in busi- 
ness at Hamilton in Ravalli county, was born on 
July 22, 1859, at Mount \^ernon. Mo., the son of 
William H. and Mary M. (DowHne) Cooper, the 
former a native of Tennessee and the latter of 
Indiana. The father was a soldier in the Union 
army in the Ninth Kansas Volunteers, in which 
he saw active service during part of the struggle 
and afterwards worked in the harness department, 
being in the army three and one-half years. He 
belongs to the Sons of the American Revolution 
and the Grand Army of the Republic. Of the five 
children in the family Oliver C. was the first. 
He attended the public schools at Bethel, Ore., 
and the Wasco Academy at The Dalles, subse- 
quently pursuing a course at the Portland Busi- 
ness College, where he was graduated in 1884 and 
came at once to Montana, locating in the Bitter 
Root valley at Grantsdale, where he kept books 
for a lumber firm six months and then was mana- 
ger of the store of H. H. Grant for a year, when 
he purchased a half interest in the store and as- 
sisted in conducting it for eight years. Selling out 
to his partner he went to Hamilton and purchased 
an interest in the store of Adair, AIcMurray & 
Co. Later Air. Adair sold his interest and the 
firm became McI^Jurray, Cooper & Grill. Mr. 
Cooper is still connected with the house, which is 
doing a very extensive business, enlarging its 
operations, adding to the reputation and improve- 
ment of the town and rewarding the zeal and ca- 
pacity of its proprietors with good returns. 

Mr. Cooper is an active and ardent Republican, 
prominent in the councils of his party, potential 
in its management and much desired as a standard 
bearer. He was elected to the state senate in 1894 
and filled a term of four years, in which he exhib- 
ited legislative qualifications of a high order and 
served his people with distinction and satisfaction. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic or- 
der and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
in both of which he has been verv active and filled 



high official stations. In Masonry he has taken 
all the degrees up to and including the thirty- 
second and has also been the worshipful master of 
his lodge. In the Odd Fellows he is past noble 
grand and has passed the chairs in the encamp- 
ment. Mr. Cooper was married at Grantsdale, on 
May 29, 1887, to Miss Ella M. Grant, daughter 
of H. H. and Jane M. Grant, his wife being the 
daughter of his former partner. They have had 
five children, of whom four are living, OUie M., 
Goldie, Lysle V. and Bessie. His family is one 
of the most interesting in the town, and like him- 
self and Mrs. Cooper, adds much to the social Hfe 
and enjoyment of the place. 



THOMAS COTTER, one of the progressive, 
wide-awake, enterprising ranchers of Broad- 
water county, resides near Canton, Mont., and 
was born in St. Lawrence county, N. Y., on De- 
cember 24, 1857, the son of Patrick Cotter, a na- 
tive of County Cork, Ireland. His father, and the 
paternal grandfather of Thomas, was Michael Cot- 
ter, a farmer of County Cork. Patrick Cotter 
came to the United States when quite young, and 
settled in St. Lawrence county, N. Y. Here he 
married Miss Honora Lantrey, also a native of 
County Cork, who had come to the United States 
with her father, Joshua Lantrey, when she was five 
years of age. They settled in New York state 
and engaged in farming. Patrick Cotter still re- 
sides in New York, and all of his five sons and 
nine daughters are now^ Hving. Thomas Cotter 
remained on the homestead farm until 1877, when 
he was twenty years of age, receiving education 
in the public schools. He then turned his steps 
westward, arriving at Canton, Mont., on June 
18, 1877. He engaged m profitable ranching for 
three years and then for three years more turned 
his attention to the livery business. Selling this 
he purchased the Tierney ranch, returning to the 
business of stock and grain raising, and usual)}' 
winters 100 head of cattle and horsea 

In 1881 Mr. Cotter's brothers, John J. and 
Charles P., came to Montana. The former is now 
street commissioner of Butte. In 1898 he was 
elected to the state legislature. His sister, Helen, 
is now Mrs. P. W. Murray, also profitably engaged 
in business in Butte. On May 8, 1884, Mr. Cot- 
ter was married to Miss Rose Durnen, daughter of 
Thomas Durnen, of Winston. They have had 



I032 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



seven children, Charles, now attending the ex- 
cellent training school at Townsend ; Rose Lillian, 
deceased : William, also at the training school ; 
John, Mary, both at public school, and Thomas 
Francis. During his residence in the young com- 
monwealth of Montana, in which he has made a 
prosperous home for his interesting family, Mr. 
Cotter has won a large circle of friends who hold 
him in the highest esteem, and he is known and 
acknowledged as a man of sound business judg- 
ment and the highest personal character. 



q^HOMAS O'HANLON.— When, on February 
1 15, 1898, the big and sympathetic heart of the 
pleasing subject of this review ceased to beat, it 
was said by one who knew him well, that "one of 
the best and brightest, one of the most patriotic 
and philanthropic men in Montana was lost to her 
forever," for he was honored and respected, 
esteemed and beloved by all classes of men for the 
nobility, generosity, progressiveness and courtli- 
ness of his nature, the usefulness of his life and the 
force of his high example. 

Mr. O'Hanlon was born at Prospect Lodge, 
Cream Point, County Clare, Ireland, about the 
year 1845. His parents were John and Ellen 
(Kendall) O'Hanlon, who lived and died in Ire- 
land, where the father was a prosperous landhold- 
er and farmer. They had three sons and one 
daughter. Thomas and his brother Henry J. be- 
came citizens of the United States. The brother 
is now manager and administrator of our subject's 
estate. Thomas was educated in the district 
schools of his native land, and in 1868 immigrated 
to the United States, stopping first at Sioux City, 
Iowa, where he was employed in the oiifice of the 
Sioux City Gazette for some months. In 1869 he 
came to Montana, being sent to Fort Peck by 
Durfee & Peck, Indian traders at that point. Sev- 
eral years later he received an appointment as 
post-trader at Fort Belknap, where he remained 
until the Great Northern Railroad was built 
through the territory, when he started the town of 
Chinook and embarked on a commercial career 
of magnitude and importance. In addition to his 
business at this point, he was extensively inter- 
ested in cattle and ranch property and mines. He 
was one of the original promoters of the Landusky 
district mines in the Little Rocky mountains, in- 
vesting a large amount of money in developing 



them. He opened the first store in Chinook, and 
was a large holder of real estate in the town and 
the Milk river valley, working actively in connec- 
tion with J. J. Hill in developing and building up 
this section of the state. During the gold excite- 
ment in the Little Rockies he opened a branch 
store in the neighborhood of the mines, and con- 
ducted it successfully for some time. 

Thus his active mind was always busy with 
schemes and enterprises for the advancement of 
his section and the service and welfare of his fel- 
lowmen. At his death he left two sons : Thomas 
J. and Henry. Thomas J. enHsted August 15, 
1899, at Boston, Mass., in Company B, Thirtyr 
sixth United States Volunteer Infantry, for ser- 
vice in the Philippines, and during his service was 
in six engagements, among them those at Bam- 
bon, Mengaterem and Porae on the island of 
Luzon. He was mustered out of the service 
March 16, 1901, with the rank of first sergeant, 
which he had earned by meritorious conduct and 
gallantry. His brother Henry is a student at 
Notre Dame University in Indiana. 



pHARLES COTTLE, although by birth an 
v^ lowan, has passed the greater portion of his 
life in the far west, prmcipally in Oregon, Califor- 
nia and Montana. He is a native of Burlington, 
Iowa, born on September 15, 1845, the son of 
Royal and Sarah (Parker) Cottle, natives of Charles 
county, Mo., one of a family of seven children. 
With a party of 100 emigrants the father crossed 
the plains in 1847, two years prior to the great 
hegira of the 'forty-niners, and engaged for a 
time in the saw and gristmill business in Oregon. 
With the discovery of gold in California he im- 
mediately removed there and opened a store in 
Sacramento, but continued to vibrate between Cal- 
ifornia and Oregon until 1857, when he located 
with his family at San Jose, Santa Clara county. 
Subsequently he removed to San Benito county, 
where for awhile he was interested in stockraising, 
but later went back to the Willows, near San Jose, 
which was a very valuable piece of property. In 
1853 he was elected to the territorial legislature 
of Oregon. 

Mr. Charles Cottle was educated in Oregon and 
accompanied the family to California in 1857, 
remaining there until 1863. He then returned to 
Oregon and began making trips between that ter- 







^^^^ 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1033 



ritory and Idaho driving stock, and during this 
period he had several narrow escapes from death 
at the hands of hostile Indians. In one of these 
encounters he was struck in the cheek by an arrow, 
causing an extremely painful wound and necessi- 
tating the removal of several teeth. At various 
times he found a number of dead bodies, victims 
of the savages. Nearly ten years of his life were 
passed at Canyon City, in eastern Oregon, three 
3^ears of which period he was employed in driv- 
ing cattle between that place and Winnemucca, 
Nev., a very dangerous employment, owing to 
the malignance of the Bannack, Snake and Piute 
Indians. During that memorable reign of terror 
hundreds of cattle and quite a large number of 
men were killed. In 1880 the United States gov- 
ernment rounded up the Piutes and Snakes and 
transported them to the Yakima reservation, Mr. 
Cottle being one of the party accompanying them 
to their destination. When he arrived in Montana 
in 1881, he entered the employment of Briggs & 
Ellis, and the year following he had charge of the 
extensive ranch and cattle interests of W. D. 
Ellis, which were extensive. Here he remained 
eight years and then went on to the Boulder river 
in Sweet Grass county, where he secured 300 
acres of land and engaged in the cattle business 
on his own account. The greater portion of his 
property is well irrigated and he raises fine crops 
of timothy hay and alfalfa. 



q^HOMAS COURCHENE.— The gentleman 
1 whose name initiates this paragraph has had 
a singularly interesting career, has been conspicu- 
ously identified with the wild life of the plains and 
mountain fastnesses, participated in numerous bat- 
tles with the Indians of the great northwest, acted 
as scout and guide in connection with several of 
the United States government's military posts 
on the frontier, and met with many thrilling ad- 
ventures and narrow escapes, becoming thoroughly 
familiar with Indian character and customs, and 
is an excellent type of the true frontiersman. 
He is now a successful stockgrower and business 
man of Valley county. Mr. Courchene comes of 
French lineage, and the name as here entered is 
ihe original Gaelic form of spelling, but many ye?.rs 
ago to correspond with the pronunciation given 
by the English, the orthography was changed to 
Gushing, and- it is as Gushing that he is gen- 



erally known. Mr. Courchene was born at La 
Bale du Febore, or St. Antoine de la Baie, in 
County Yamaska, P. Q., Canada, on March 18, 
1 85 1, the son of Joseph and Henriette (Manseau) 
Courchene, natives of the province of Quebec, 
where the father passed the greater part of his 
life in farming, though he was for a time a farmer 
in Massachusetts. He died in his native province 
in 1875, his wife having passed away in 1869. 

Thomas Courchene was educated in St. David's 
school, Quebec, and in the public schools of Low- 
ell, Mass., whither he accompanied his parents 
in 1859. In the spring of 1869 Mr. Courchene 
went to Rulo, Richardson county. Neb., re- 
mained a year, and in the spring of 1870 jour- 
neyed to Fort Buford, S. D., and he made that 
post his headquarters for many years. For a time 
he was clerk in the post trader's store and later 
entered the employ of the Durfee & Peck Fur 
Company. In the fall of 1870 his party was at- 
tacked by the Indians at Poplar creek, while at- 
tempting to reach Fort Peck, and in the engage- 
ment he was severely wounded in the shoulder, and 
was compelled to pass the winter at Fort Bu- 
ford. During the summer of 1871 he was en- 
gaged in scouting for Col. Gilbert, then in com- 
mand of the fort, and in the spring ot 1872 he 
went to trade with the Indians at Fort Peck and 
on Frenchman's creek in Montana, in the employ 
of the Durfee & Peck Fur Company, and later 
in the same year he traded on his own account 
at Fort Peck. In the winter of 1872 he was 
again on a trading expedition for the fur company, 
and in one of three Indian fights in which he par- 
ticipated he received another severe wound. In the 
summer of 1873 he was in the employ of Jack 
Simmons at Fort Peck, spending the winter at 
Fort Buford. In the spring he went to Standing 
Rock, where he remained until 1875, and for a 
year he was engaged in scouting for Gen. Custer 
from Fort Lincoln, S. D. He passed the summer 
of 1876 in the Black Hills, taking part in another 
fierce fight with the Indians, and in the fall he 
returned to Fort Buford, where Gen. Miles en- 
gaged his services as guide, scout and interpreter, 
as which he served two years. In the fall of 1878 
Mr. Courchene located a ranch at Cusick Springs, 
near the Missouri river and forty miles southeast 
of Fort Buford, and in the summer of 1879 was 
guide for a cattle outfit, taking it into Canada 
and he gave up his ranch in the fall of that year. 

He passed the winter on the ranch of John 



1034 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Culbertson, near the present town of Culbertson, 
Valley county, Mont., and in the spring established 
a toll ferry at Fort Buford, where he remained 
four years. In the spring of 1885 Mr Courchene 
took up family (Indian) allotment land one and 
one-half miles east of Culbertson, and in the 
summer of 1888 he filed on a homestead claim of 
160 acres, which now embraces the growing town 
just named. He was the founder of Culbertson 
and is still owner of the townsite, which com- 
prises eighty acres, and was surveyed and platted 
in the fall of 1899. He still retains his fine ranch 
property near the town and also owns and oper- 
ates the stockyards at Culbertson, which is now 
an important shipping point. He also owns a fine 
cattle and horse ranch on Wolf creek, twenty- 
eight miles north of Culbertson, and is recognized 
as one of the prosperous citizens of Valley county. 
In politics he accords allegiance to the Repub- 
lican party, and has taken an active part in pub- 
lic affairs of a local nature. On January 7, 1885, 
Mr. Courchene was married to an Indian woman 
of the Sioux tribe, who died at Culbertson in 
1891, leaving three children, Thomas Manseau, Al- 
fred and Daniel. On January 17, 1894, he married 
his present wife, who is Hkewise of the Sioux tribe, 
and was born at Yankton, S. D. They have two 
children, Ruby and Peter. 

"While Mr. Courchene was acting as scout for 
Gen. Miles, at one particular time his services 
in all probability saved the command of 350 men 
at Cedar creek, Mont., from the fate of Gen. 
Custer. Before the troops met the Indians, and 
when they were about one mile apart, Mr. Cour- 
chene was sent out alone to arrange for a coun- 
cil. The arrangements he made were these : The 
commands were to remain a mile apart and all 
of the officers were to meet in the center without 
arms. He returned and informed Gen. Miles what 
he had done and he approved of it. Mr. Cour- 
chene says : 'The Indians I saw meant mis- 
chief.' Many of the same Indians were there 
as were at the Custer fight, a number of them 
wearing full uniforms of the Seventh United States 
Cavalry, as well as having in their possession 
their sabers, guidons, flags, etc. The intention of the 
Indians, as told Mr. Courchene by John Bourger, 
a half-breed Sioux, then an outlaw and now dead, 
at a later period, was to up with the troops and 
when a good opportunity occurred to hammer 
the troops on the head. Mr. Courchene saw that 
they did not maintain the condition of the agree- 



ment to keep apart, but commenced to mingle 
with the troops, begging tobacco, matches, etc., 
as a pretext to close in with them. This the 
officers encouraged, not suspecting danger. Mr. 
Courchene first protested and remonstrated with 
the Indians, but to no avail, they replying that it 
was all right, that their intentions were friendly. 
At last when fully 600 Sioux had mingled with 
the 350 whites Mr. Courchene rode up to Gen. 
Miles and informed him of his suspicions of in- 
tended massacre, and the General ordered his 
bugler to sound an alarm. The officers and men 
then formed into line, the artillery prepared for 
action, and the men began to throw entrenchments. 
The Indians were foiled and had to go. There 
was a so-called council, but it was a farce. The 
plan was well conceived. To allay suspicion, they 
had held a farcical council on the previous even- 
ing and mingled with the troops in the same man- 
ner and thought they had fully prepared the way 
for a complete destruction of unsuspecting vic- 
tims. At this time Mr. Courchene was off on a 
scouting duty. The half-breed's statement to Mr. 
Courchene was later corroborated. How the 
Sioux war ended is another story, too long to 
detail here. A number of the officers personally 
expressed their gratitude to Mr. Courchene and 
told him that he had undonbtedl}- saved the lives 
of the whole command." 



WILLIAM T. CRESAP.— A native of ".Afy 
Maryland," where he was born August 28, 
1843, a descendant of a house long established in 
that eood old commonwealth and with an honor- 
able record in her history in peace and war, Wil- 
liam T. Cresap had all the incentives to good citi- 
zei"=hip and useful industry that can come from 
birth and training. His father, Michael Cresap, 
was a prosperous and influential hotel keeper of the 
old style, on the national turnpike between Balti- 
more and Wheeling, when the public house was the 
rallying point of the neighborhood where all ques- 
tions of statecraft, local politics, great and small 
business and social afifairs were discussed and for 
the n^nst part settled, so far as the community w;is 
conremed. In this way the son was brou"-ht into 
close contact with all manner of men, and was 
learrin-T the different phases and developments of 
human nature even from his childhood. His 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



mother, Sarah (Hoblitzell) Cresap, was also the 
descendant of an old Maryland family of the mid- 
dle class ; prosperous farmers for generations, with 
true ideas of the dignity of labor and the sterling 
manhood which it begets. Both- parents were 
members of the Presbyterian church, in which faith 
they died, the father in 1882 and the mother in 
1898, at very advanced ages. 

Mr. Cresap attended the public schools of his 
district until he was ten years old, when he was 
hired to a farmer, working for $8.00 per month for 
a few years, and then in partnership with his father 
taking charge of the farm and conducting it for six 
years with gratifying success. He then concluded 
to take his chances in the far west; and leaving 
Kentucky, whither he had gone to see the country, 
he crossed the plains with an emigrant train and 
located at Alder gulch, Mont., where he devoted 
one year's time to work in the mines for wages, 
and then moved to Helena. There he secured a 
freighting outfit and conducted it with profit until 
1869. He then went to Oregon, purchased a drove 
of horses and returning with them to Helena sold 
out and invested the proceeds in placer mines. These 
he sold out in a short time and again engaged m 
freighting from all points, continuing in the business 
until 1880, when he entered into partnership witii 
Charles Turner and began operations in handling 
sheep on a large scale. They followed this pre- 
carious traffic for seven years, sometimes on the 
mountain tops of prosperity and again in the depths 
of adversity ; but gradually losing ground, owing 
to the uncertainties of the seasons and the fluctua- 
tions of the market. In 1887 they found themselves 
practically bankrupt and quit the business. Mr. 
Cresap then conducted a stage house at Cora for 
nineteen \-ears, and by industry and care won back 
much of what he had lost, and was able to stand . 
erect once more. He decided to return to the oc- 
cupation of his fathers, and took up a homestead 
and a desert claim. To the improvement of these 
and to the rearing of cattle and horses for market 
he has since devoted his time and energies, and 
has prospered abundantly. In politics he is a Dem- 
ocrat, but not an active partisan, preferring the 
quiet and regularity of his rural life to the turmoil 
and exactions of political strife. He does not, 
however, withhold from his party the service he 
can render as a modest member of its rank and 
file. And to every public enterprise in his com- 
munity he gives his share of assistance in counsel 
and in more substantial aid. 



ELMER E. CRAWFORD.— Organizer and man- 
ager, directing force and chief inspiration uf 
the Bloomington Land & Livestock Company, at 
Shawmut, Meagher county, Mont., an enterprise of 
imposing magnitude that he has built up from 
almost nothing by his energy and skill, Elmer E. 
Crawford is an impressive illustration of what is 
possible to industry intelligently applied in this 
great northwest. He was born October 17, 1861. 
at Cumberland, ]Md., a son of James and Elizabeth 
( Hinkle ) Crawford, the former a native of Penn- 
sylvania and the latter of Maryland. The father 
was a farmer in Maryland until 1864, when he 
removed to Illinois and Hved for ten years it 
Ottawa, then removed to Normal, a suburb of 
Bloomington, 111., where he engaged in the live- 
stock and butchering business. Mr. Crawford 
passed his school days in Ottawa and Normal, and 
after leaving school was associated with his father 
in business until the fall of 1880, when he came 
to ]Montana and located in Helena, where he had an 
elder brother, Asbury, engaged in floriculture and 
market gardening. He went into his brother's em- 
ploy and remained eight months ; then went to work 
at carpentering, spending the summer in Butte. 
In the fall he returned to Helena and fomied a 
partnership with his brother which continued until 
1883, when in company with another brother, 
George S., he located his present ranch and settled 
thereon, located about half way between Harlowton 
and Lavina. They continued to conduct a flourish- 
ing business here until 1897, when they formed the 
outfit into a joint stock company, known as the 
Bloomington Land & Livestock Company. Ow- 
ing to ill health George disposed of his interest and 
retired, now being at Kendall and interested in 
mining in which he has a particularly bright out- 
look, his brother Elmer taking the position of gen- 
eral manager and resident representative of the 
company in conducting the ranch. In 1893-4 the 
brothers bought $50,000 worth of cattle, but owing 
to the severity of the winter, for which they were 
not then prepared as now, and also to the financial 
panic, they were heavy losers. The Bloomington 
Land and Livestock Company owns 30,000 acres 
of land, and it has 10,000 acres under lease. It 
usually has from 2,000 to 3,000 well bred cattle. 
Herefords being the favorite, and during the past 
two years the company has taken the prizes at 
Chicago in competition with other western feeder.^. 
It has 1,500 acres of land under irrigation and cuU 
tivation, and raises large crops of hay, alfalfa an<l 



1036 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



grain, having 5,000 bushels of grain in igor. The 
property has been selected with a view to water and 
shelter, and is probably as good for the stock busi- 
ness as can be found in the state. It is improved 
with excellent buildings and all the appliances us- 
ually found in a first class stock outfit. The com- 
pany also has a band of fine Norman horses. 

In June, 1887, Mr. Crawford was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Georgia B. Broderick, a native of 
Little Falls, N. Y., and daughter of Dwight Brod- 
erick, a prominent contractor and builder now lo- 
cated at Wilton Center, 111. Their children are: 
Dwight E., Bertha W., Howard B. and Dorothy H. 
Mr. Crawford is the postmaster at Shawmut and is 
most highly esteemed throughout the community, 
and with all with whom he may have business or 
social relations. 



JAMES M. CROFT.— This gentleman, the 
J treasurer of Fergus county, is recognized as 
one of the able and progressive citizens of this 
section of the state. He is a native of Waterbury, 
New Haven county. Conn., where he was born 
on the 3d of January, 1858, a son of Edward 
and Martha (Packard) Croft, the former of whom 
was born in Waterbury, Conn., and the latter in 
Ashfield,. Mass., both of old New England families. 
Edward Croft was a machinist, was superintend- 
ent of large manufactories at different times, and 
in politics was a stanch Republican. He died on 
February 6, 1885. His wife was a member of 
the Congregational church, and was called from 
earth on the 24th of November, 1872. Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Croft had five childreUj^ all now liv- 
ing except Margaret, who died in 1888. The 
survivors are James M., Marian, Edward and 
Martha. 

James M. Croft received a public and high school 
education. Leaving school when seventeen he se- 
cured a clerkship in a mercantile establishment 
in Waterbury, and followed this line of occupation 
for six years. In the spring of 1881 he came to 
Montana and was in the employ of the Dearborn 
Sheep Company, on the Sun river, until the spring 
of 1882, when he came to the Judith basin, and, 
in partnership with Ben Maltby and N. E. Met- 
calf, located lands near Stanford, and here they 
have since conducted sheep raising upon a quite 
extensive scale. They control 1,300 acres of land 
and are numbered among the leading ranchmen nf 
this section. 



In 1898 James M. Croft volunteered for service 
in the Spanish-American war, in Company I, First 
Montana Regiment, which he accompanied to the 
Philippines. He was in active service at Manila 
until the regiment was mustered out at San Fran- 
cisco, on the 17th of October, 1899. He is a mem- 
ber of the Spanish-American War Veterans' Asso- 
ciation, and is also identified with the blue lodge 
of the Masonic fraternity and with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and the Woodmen 
of the World. 

In politics Mr. Croft has ever been an unwaver- 
ing Republican, and an active worker in its cause. 
In 1894 he was elected assessor of Fergus county 
and was chosen his own successor in 1896, while 
at the election in November, 1900, he was elected 
treasurer of the county, in which he is giving an 
efficient and discriminating service. He made his 
residence in Lewistown upon asuming the duties 
of this position. 

On the 20th of November, 1889, Mr. Croft was 
united in marriage to Miss Jennie Capewell Shelly, 
who was born in Stafifordshire, England, the 
daughter of George Shelly. Mr. Shelly was long 
connected with offices of high rank in the Eng- 
lish army, his death occurring in the prime of his 
life. Mrs. Croft died on the 27th of March, 1894, 
leaving three children — Margaret, Miriam and 
James S. She was a member of the First Con- 
gregational church of Waterbury, Conn., and a 
woman whose gentle grace of character endeared 
her to a large circle ol friends. 



WM. CRISP, whose death occasioned universal 
regret in this community, was for a long time 
one of the leading citizens and most prosperous and 
progressive ranchmen of Montana. He was the 
scion of two old North Carolina families, but him- 
self a native of Monroe county, Tenn., where he 
was born January 10, 1822. His parents were Abel 
and Polly Ann (Porter) Crisp, both born and reared 
in Burke county, N. C. The father was a farmer 
by occupation, and had many changes of location in 
his time. W. M. Crisp remained in the south until 
he was twelve years of age, attending school as he 
liad opportunity, and working on the farm with 
his father. In 1834 he accompanied the family to 
Indiana and later to Illinois, where he remained 
imtil 1864. He then made the momentous and dan- 
12,'erous trip to Montana, traveling by way of the 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1037 



Missouri river and arriving at Virginia City on 
June ID, 1864. He at once went to Brown's gulch, 
and after a short experience in mining removed 10 
Red Mountain City. There he struck a very rich 
lead which subsequently became known as the 
"Only Chance," from which he took a great quan- 
tity of the precious metal, working it profitably for 
a number of years. In the fall of 1870 ;\Ir. Crisp 
took up a homestead on the South Boulder, which 
he largely increased by subsequent purchases, and 
here he made his home for the rest of his life, farm- 
ing it skillfully and raising excellent crops of hay, 
grain, potatoes and other agricultural products, and 
also raising numbers of fine cattle and horses, us- 
ually wintering some 200 head. 

On October 9, 1852, Mr. Crisp was united in 
marriage to Miss India Ann Kelvin, a native of 
Brown county, Ohio, and daughter of Samuel Kel- 
vin, a prosperous farmer of that county. Airs. 
Crisp survives him and enjoys the same exalted de- 
gree of respect and esteem in the community that 
was his in life and added so much to his happiness. 
For more than thirty years Mr. Crisp was a Master 
Mason, and was held in the highest esteem by 
the members of the order. Although deeply inter- 
ested in public affairs he was never a witness in 
a court or served on any kind of a jury, such duties 
being" very distasteful to him. This good, useful 
and upright man is a pleasing theme over which 
the pen of the biographer fain would linger. His 
life was a stimulus to generous endeavor in others, 
and was in every way worthy of close examination 
and diligent imitation. The influences of such men 
does not end with their lives. It is a vital force 
which survives their mortal frames and goes on 
multiplyini;- in goodness and usefulness. 



PROF. W. L. CRONK, principal of the ex- 
cellent training school of Townsend, and a 
prominent member of the United Workmen, in 
which he has held important official positions, was 
born at Bunker Hdl, Ind., on July 5, 1856. He 
is the only son of Henry and Elizabeth (Long) 
Cronk, both natives of Indiana. Henry Cronk 
was killed during the Civil war, but his family have 
never secured reliable details regarding the time 
or place of his death. In September, 1867, Mrs. 
Cronk removed with her young son to Atchison, 
Kan., where they resided until 1873. when they 
went to Lawrence and later to Chanute, in Neosha 



county. Prof. Cronk here received educational 
advantages of the public schools, but, always 
of a studious disposition, he aspired to a more ad- 
vanced course, and matriculated at the University 
of Kansas at Lawrence, eminent for its scholas- 
tic advantages, and from this noted institution he 
was graduated in 1873. For seven years after his 
graduation he was a commercial traveler and col- 
lector for the wholesale house of H. B. Treat & 
Co., of Atchison, Kan. 

In 1890 he took charge of the office of the Ne- 
osha county superintendent of public instruction 
for two years. Coming then to Montana in 1892, 
he located at Townsend, becoming the principal 
of its public schools. This position he held with 
marked ability for two years, leaving then to 
accept the same position in the schools of Castle, 
Aleagher county, in which he remained three years. 
He had previously wedded with Julia May Cole', 
daughter of J. W. Cole, of Chanute, Kan. Their 
three children are Opal, Ruth and Clyde. 

The desire to complete a law course was still 
strong within him. Accordingly he returned to 
Kansas, and, after consultation with his family, 
it was decided to make the trip by private con- 
veyance, and in this manner the family began the 
long but highly enjoyable journey of nearly 1,800 
miles and of over two months duration. The 
weather was pleasant and they added much to the 
excitement of the trip by fishing and shooting. 

On September 5, 1897, Prof. Cronk entered the 
law department of the University of Kansas. As 
he had previously acquired a general knowledge 
of law, he having heretofore assiduously continued 
his reading for three years, he was enabled to take 
his degree after one year's study m the more ad- 
vanced and technical branches of the course. The 
family then returned 'to Townsend, where he prac- 
ticed law successfully for one year, then, at the urg- 
ent solicitation of the most influential citizens, 
he opened the Townsend Training School. Up 
to this time the children of that city, after passing 
the eighth grade of the schools, were com- 
pelled to seek other locaHties for instruction in 
the higher branches. Prof. Cronk opened his 
school on October 23, 1899, with eighteen pupils. 
On September 19, 1900, the second term of this 
valuable educational institution opened with a class 
of fifty-three pupils. The school opened with a 
much larger enrollment the second year, Mr. 
H. Record, of Thayer, Kan., a former pupil of 
Prof. Cronk's, becoming a partner in the work. 



1038 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Prospects for the coming school year are excep- 
tionally bright. The courses for the connng year 
are common school, high school, normal, business, 
select, training and musical. Board and liv- 
ing expenses have been reduced to the minimum. 
This school is turning out some of the brightest 
and best young teachers in the state, as well as 
competent persons from the other departments. 
The training school has been furnishing about 
fifty per cent, of the common school graduates 
of Broadwater county. Prof. Cronk stands high 
m educational circles and he is considered one of 
the most prominent educators of the state, while 
the work to which he has devoted himself wins 
hearty recognition and support. 



HOWARD CROSBY, assistant postmaster of 
Great Falls, Mont., has for many years been 
prominent in the business aiifairs of that cit} , an'! 
ihroughout the state he is widely known. As 
county clerk and ex-officio recorder of Cascade 
county, and in numerous other positions of trust 
he has rendered most efficient service. He come.s 
from one of the oldest Colonial families in Amer- 
ica, and was born in New York city, on July i, 
1853. He is a direct descendant in the eighth gen- 
eration of Simon and Ann Crosby, who sailed from 
England on the good ship Susan and Ellen, in 
April, 1635. Locating at Cambridge, Mass., they 
soon became large landholders and prominent in 
the colony. They had three sons : Thomas, born 
in 1635, Simon in 1637 and Joseph in 1639, and 
within a year from the birth of Joseph his father 
closed his earthly career. 

Howard Crosby descends from Thomas, the 
eldest of the three sons, who graduated from Har- 
vard in 1653 and was a Congregational minister, 
l^reaching for many years at Eastham, Mass., and 
dying in Boston, on June 13, 1702. He married 
a Brackett, and had a son John, born on Decem- 
ber 4, 1670, and died on May 25, 1714. The dis- 
tinguished Thomas Brackett Reed is a descend- 
ant through Sarah Brackett. John Crosby's son 
David, born on April 13, 1709, and married on 
June 19, 1735, to Rebecca Hopkins. He removed 
from Eastham, Mass., to Southeast, N. Y., in 1750, 
and died there on February 25, 1788. His son 
David, born on September 6, 1737, died on Novem- 
ber 16, 1816. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Bethia Hopkins, died on July 2, 1776, at the age of 



forty-one. Their son, Peter Crosby, Howard's 
grandfather, was born in Southeast, N. Y., on 
September 4, 1763, and married Ruth Waring on 
January 25, 1783. He was sherif? of Putnam 
county, N. Y., in 1813, 1814 and 1815. and his 
death occurred on November 9, 1831, and that of 
his wife on July 31, 1830. Peter Crosby, the 
youngest of their eleven children, was born in 
Southeast, N. Y., on November 26, 1807, and on 
March 4, 1850, he married Elizabeth Petty, of 
Southampton, L. I. He served an apprenticeship 
to the jewelry business in New York from the age 
of sixteen until he was twenty-one. His wife 
died on August 10, 1861, when she was thirty-one 
years old and her husband survived her until 
November, 1878. Their two children were How- 
ard and George, born on March 20, 1855. 

After an academic course at Union Hall Acad- 
emy at Jamaica on Long Island, and from 1870 
to 1881 he was a clerk in a dry goods store. He 
was then appointed vice consul to Bogota, South 
America, holding the position about a year, and 
later the consul, W. W. Randall, and Mr. Crosby 
were partners in a street railway franchise in 
Bogota. Mr. Crosby went to New York, placed 
the franchise on a secure foundation and then 
made three visits to Europe, placing the stock of 
the company in London, Berlin, Paris and St. 
Petersburg. While in South America Messrs. 
Crosby and Randall purchased from an old anti- 
quarian a unique collection of Indian curios, which 
he had spent twenty years in gathering. It con- 
sisted of images wrought in gold, silver and cop- 
per, and a large number of copper medallions, 
coins and other articles, which had long been 
hidden from the sight of man. They first took 
this collection for sale to the New York museum, 
thence to Berlin, \^ienna and Paris, but in all 
of these cities the prospective purchasers desired 
to make a selection therefrom, and this the owners 
would not permit. Finally they sold the entire col- 
lection in London to Sir John Lubbock, a trus- 
tee of the British museum, to which institution he 
presented the collection, for which he paid $40,000. 

Mr. Crosby came to Helena in the spring of 
1886 and soon went to Great Falls. At Big or 
Lower Falls he located a tract of land, which he 
sold a year and a half later and, returning to Great 
Falls, he accepted the appointment of deputy 
county clerk and recorder. He served a year with 
fidelity and accuracy, and was elected on the Re- 
publican ticket to the same office in 1889. Mr. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1039 



Crosby served two terms as clerk and recorder, 
one term of two and one of three years, retiring 
from office in 1895. Having served during one 
session as enrolling clerk in the Montana legis- 
lature, in 1896 he was made deputy assessor of 
Cascade county. In the fall of 1896 he was ap- 
pointed deputy county treasurer, under A. E. Dick- 
erman, in which position he remained one year. 
In 1897 the county commissioners detailed him to 
make an abstract of the Neihart and Barker terri- 
tory, just then added to Cascade county, and in 
1898 he was appointed assistant postmaster under 
H. O. Chowen. Numerous investments have been 
made by him in city property in Great Falls, and 
all have proved valuable. At Great Falls, on Oc- 
tober 28, 1891, was celebrated the marriage of 
Howard Crosby and Miss Elizabeth E. Trusty, 
the daughter of Joseph S. M. Trusty, of Fort 
Dodge, Iowa. They have one child, Howard, born 
July 22, 1894. Mr. Crosby is a prominent mem- 
ber of several social clubs, is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Electric City Club, and a member of 
the United Workmen. In business and official af- 
fairs he is quick, decided and energetic, but withal 
pleasant and courteous, with a personal magnetism 
which has won hiin hosts of friends. 



DUDLEY CROXA'THER, who is a popular 
young business man of the cit}- of Great 
Falls, where he holds the important position of 
court stenographer for the district court, has been 
very successful in his profession, in which he has 
continuously held positions of responsibility since 
coming to the United States. He was born in 
England, at Manor House, East Clandon, Surrey, 
on February 21, 1869, the son of William and 
Alice Catherine ( Dawson ) Crowther, represent- 
atives of fine old English families. William Crow- 
ther was born near London, in 1839, and re- 
ceived his education in King's College, Lon- 
don, after which he completed a two-years course 
in the same institution in theoretical farming. His 
ne.xt work was to apply his theories Ijy serving an 
apprenticeship of five years in practical farming, 
after which he devoted his attention for several 
years to the management of the Manor farm at 
East Clandon. He is now a resident of the par- 
ish of Long Ditton, Surrey, England. His father, 
who also bore the name of William, was a resident 
of County Surrey. He was the owner of large 



properties there and in London. His wife was a 
native of Yorkshire, where she was born in 1838, 
th? daughter of John Dawson, a prominent physi- 
cian and surgeon. 

Dudley Crowther received his education in a 
boarding school in London and in 1884, when fif- 
teen, he came to the United States, locating at To- 
peka, Kan., where he was for two years m the em- 
ploy of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 
Company, after which he went to St. Paul, Minn., 
and was there for two years as stenographer for 
George B. Harris, the local manager of the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. For the 
next two years j\Ir. Crowther was chief clerk for 
A. L. Mohler, then assistant general manager, 
and afterwards general manager, of the St. Paul, 
MinneapoHs & Manitoba Railroad, which later 
was absorbed by the Great Northern. From 1890 
to 1892 he was identified with the traffic depart- 
ment of the Great Northern, under P. P. Shelby, 
at St. Paul, in each of these incumbencies acting 
as stenographer, a profession in which he is a 
recognized expert, and is entirely self-educated. 

In 1892 Mr. Crowther visited his old home in 
England, returning to the United States in August 
and locating in Great Falls, where for about two 
weeks he was in the employ of the Great North- 
ern Railroad, after which he engaged with the 
Great Falls Townsite Coftipany, with which he re- 
mained until 1896, in the meanwhile doing short- 
hand work and acting as secretary for the Great 
Falls board of trade. When Judge J. B. Leslie was 
elected to preside on the bench of the district court 
in 1896, he appointed Mr. Crowther to the office 
of court stenographer, in which capacity he has 
since continued to serve to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. In politics he is a stanch advocate of 
the Democratic party, and is vice-president of 
the Young Men's Democratic club of Great Falls. 
He is deservedly popular in the social circles of 
llie city and is held in high esteem Ijy all who know 
him. 



pHARLES M. CRUTCH FIELD.— As a meni- 
Vy ber of the bar of Montana who holds distinctive 
professional prestige and marked honor as a public- 
spirited citizen, Charles M. Crutchfield is well 
worthy of mention. He comes of distinguished 
southern stock, his ancestors on either side 
having come to America in the early Colonial 
epoch and taking up their residence in the 



1040 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"Old Dominion" state, thus gaining place among 
the "first families," both in a literary way and 
in patrician lineage. He is himself a son 
of the beautiful old city of Richmond, Va., having 
been there born on June 19, 1863, one of the twelve 
children of George and Virginia (Denoon) Crutch- 
field, both of whom were likewise Virginians. 

Charles M. Crutchfield, the eldest of the children, 
after early educational discipline in the Richmond 
schools, attended the famous Washington and Lee 
University at Lexington, where he first completed 
an academic course and then entered the law de- 
partment, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1886, receiving the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. After practicing his profession for a few 
months in Richmond, Mr. Crutchfield determined 
to cast his fortunes with the ambitious young terri- 
tory of Montana. Upon his arrival in the territory 
in May, 1887, he located in Phillipsburg, then in 
Deer Lodge, now Granite county, where he was in 
active practice until 1889, when he removed to 
Missoula and entered into a professional alliance 
with Col. T. C. Marshall, this association obtaining 
until 1892, when Mr. Crutchfield was retained as 
attorney for the late Marcus Daly and the Ana- 
conda Mining Company, representing some of the 
most important financial and industrial enterprises 
in the state. Under the reorganization of the An- 
aconda Mining Company Mr. Crutchfield has con- 
tinued to be its attorney, being now retained by 
this great corporation, and giving much attention to 
its aflfairs, while he also retains a representative 
clientage in a very successful general practice. Mr. 
Crutchfield took up his residence in the attractive 
city of Hamilton, Ravalli county, in the fall of 
1895, and this is still his home. He is known as a 
thoroughly well equipped lawyer, strong advocate 
and safe counsellor. 

In politics Mr. Crutchfield has given a strong al- 
legiance to the Democratic party and has been an 
effective worker in its cause. While he was a res- 
ident of Deer Lodge county Mr. Crutchfield was 
elected to the lower house of the First general 
assembly of the legislature of the state of Montana 
and continued as a member during the Second 
assembly. From Ravalli county he was chosen as 
a representative in the Sixth general assembly, in 
which he was chairman of the judiciary committee 
of the house and a member of other important com- 
mittees. He is a man of individuality and his'h at- 
lainmcnts. and his labors in the legislative lialls 
were intelligent, timely and efficient, and he ever 



gave his aid and influence to the causes which met 
his approval as tending to conserve the best inter- 
ests of the state and its people. Mr. Crutchfield's 
religious faith is that of the Protestant Episcopal 
church, of which he is a communicant, and frater- 
nally he is identified with the Masonic order and 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He en- 
joys unmistakable popularity in both professional 
and social circles, and is one of the thoroughly rep- 
resentative young members of the bar of the state. 
He has finely equipped offices and a comprehensive 
and valuable library. At Warrington, Fauquier 
county, Va., on January 11, 1893, Mr. Crutchfield 
was united in marriage to Miss Lena R Payne, 
daughter of Inman H. and Mary (Massic) Payne, 
both of old and influential Virginia famihes. Mr. 
and Mrs. Crutchfield became the parents of five 
children, of whom three are living, Inman Payne. 
Charles Manson and Mary Hardin. 



KENNETH McLEAN.— One of the sterling 
Scotsmen of Montana, who has attained pres- 
tige both in industrial activities and public affairs, 
is Kenneth McLean, the present state senator 
from Custer county and one of the prominent citi- 
zens of Miles City. He was born in Ross-shire, 
Scotland, on the 25th of December, 1849, and is a 
scion of a long line of sturdy and virile Scottish 
forbears. His father, Alexander McLean, still re- 
sides in Scotland, where he is engaged in stock- 
raising. His wife, formerly Miss Margaret Mc- 
Kay, also a native of Scotland, died in 1873, leav- 
ing four children, of whom Kenneth was the sec- 
ond. 

After leaving school. Kenneth assisted his father 
on the old homestead until 1881, when he came 
to the United States, locating in Nebraska, where 
he took charge of the farm of an important stock- 
growing company. Remaining in that state until 
1883, he came to Montana and located on O'Fal- 
lon creek, Custer county, where he now has a fine 
ranch of 23,000 acres. He also owns a ranch 
of 680 acres in Yellowstone valley, nine miles east 
of Miles City, which is well improved and largely 
under irrigation. He first gave his attention to 
the raising of shee]i, but latterly has gone into the 
raising of high-grade horses and cattle. He has 
a large herd of cattle on the range and makes a 
specialty of breeding Hambletonian horses. He 
has been very successful in his efforts, which are 




%ytjLi^^^i-vzi!%^ y/^.^ ^z^^r. 



4i^^^^ 



PROGRESSH'E MEN OF MONTANA. 



the result of a practical experience extending from 
his youth, when he was identified with the same 
industry at the parental home. 

Politically Mr. McLean has ever been a Republi- 
can. He has taken active interest in pubHc af- 
fairs and his capability to hold office found def- 
inite recognition in the fall of 1900, when he was 
nominated by the Republicans of Custer county 
for state senator. He was accorded a gratifying 
support and was elected by a majority of 280. 
He was an active working member of the senate 
during the general assembly following his elec- 
tion, and served on a number of important com- 
mittees, including that on agriculture and public 
lands, on highways and bridges and on stock- 
growing. Mr. McLean showed himself well- 
equipped for the office and fully justified the en- 
dorsement he received at the polls. In his fra- 
ternal relations he is identified with the Free- 
masons of Miles City, and with Miles City lodge 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He 
and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
church. 

On the 28th of April, 1886, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. McLean to Miss Anna McKenzie, 
who was born in Minnesota, the daughter of John 
G. - and Rose (McFarland) McKenzie, both of 
whom were born in Scotland, the latter dying 
when Mrs. McLean was a child. Her father now 
resides with his daughter in Miles City. Mr. and 
Airs. McLean became the parents of four children, 
one of whom, Kenneth Miles, died at the age of 
three years. The survivors are Margaret Rose, 
Ina Mabel and Wallace Bruce. In 1900 Mr. Mc- 
Lean purchased a residence of line architectural 
design in Miles City and here the family has their 
home, doing well their part in the social activ- 
ities of the city. 



DAVALA CULBERSON, one of the most suc- 
cessful coal miners and operators in the state, 
resides at Sand Coulee, Cascade county. He was 
born in St. Augustine, Fla., on December 5, 
1843, the son of John Culberson. Our subject re- 
ceived his education in the schools of St. 
Augustine and of Wheeling, Ya., before the state 
of West Virginia was formed. In 1858, when he was 
but fourteen years of age, he began to learn en- 
gineering on a river boat, the Swallow, on which 
he made four trips from Pittsburg to Cincinnati, 



changing then to the Jacob Strader, plying between 
Cincinnati and St. Louis, remaining a year on this 
craft, and was then employed as an engineer on the 
City of Louisiana, a steamer running between St. 
Louis and Keokuk, Iowa, but after three months' 
service he returned to Georgia. 

Here he was quietly and industriously pursuing 
vocations of peace until the breaking out of the Civil 
war, when he was impressed into the Confederate 
service early in 1861. He remained with the Con- 
federate army until June iS, 1863, when he was 
at Winchester, Va., when a large Federal command 
surrendered to "Stonewall" Jackson. He there left 
the Confederate service and went to Columbus, 
(,)hio, and thence to Burlington, Iowa. On Julv 
4, 1863, he visited Hyde Park, and went to Oska- 
loosa, Iowa, there taking passage on a stage for 
Council Bluffs, then crossed the Missouri in a boat 
to Omaha, and made a long overland journey to 
Denver, Colo. From Denver he drifted to Pueblo, 
N. M., but soon returned to Denver, where he 
learned of the gold excitement at Alder gulch. 
Alont. Mr. Culberson started for Alder gulch, 
but the train he was with was snowbound 
at Cripple Creek, and also delayed by' trouble with 
the Indians. Their supplies gave out, and the party 
proceeded on foot to their destination, where he 
succeeded in making a fair living, but he later went 
to Last Chance gulch, where he arrived in March, 
1865. 

After working a short time at placer mining, he 
examined Diamond City and Confederate gulch. 
Fie purchased a claim, joined in the stampede for 
Cave gulch in 1866, and here he mined for seven 
years and made some money, and in the spring of 
1881 came to Sand Coulee with Samuel Dean. 
Flis assets were one horse, a chest of tools and $50 
in cash. At Belt he worked for John K. 
Castner as a wheelwright for one year, and then 
was in charge of the erection of tha bridge across 
Lower Belt creek. Following this labor he turned 
his attention to prospecting for coal, in which he has 
been eminently successful. After tw-elve months of 
assiduous prospecting he made some discoveries 
and in 1882 and 1883 he opened and operated a 
mine which is valued at $25,000. He is deserving 
of great credit for his persistence in prospecting for 
coal when the outlook was far from being encour- 
aging. Following a life of travel and adventure he 
has lived to realize by his own efforts the full 
prosperity of which he had dreamed in early 
vouth. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



FRANK CYR.— One of the pharmacists of this 
day who is really in love with his profession is 
Frank Cyr, and he refuses to subordinate its claims 
to any other line, not even to those ordinarily 
allied with it, he being a druggist first and dealer 
in toilet and other articles afterward. He is a 
native of Grant Isle, Me., where he was born on 
August 2, 1873, the third of the nine children 
of Alexis and Julia (Sirys) Cyr, also natives of the 
Pine Tree state, where the father was a prosper- 
ous farmer. Mr. Cyr attended the public schools 
until he was fourteen, then passed a year at Van 
Buren College, and was regularly entered at Mar- 
anacook College for a full academic course, and 
from which he was graduated in 1891. After- 
ward he worked on his father's farm for a year. 
At the end of that time he came directly to the 
great Treasure state in 1892, and, locating at 
Missoula, began an apprenticeship at the drug 
business with George Freisheimer, proprietor of 
the City drug store. 

After being five years in his employ and three in 
that of the Missoula Drug Company, he joined 
W. A. Simons in a partnership at Stevensville, in 
March, 1901, where they have a drug store that 
would be a credit to any city, and is one of the 
finest in this section. It is beautifully finished, 
well stocked and thoroughly equipped. But its 
distinctive features are the excellent quality of its 
goods and the superior character of its prescrip- 
tion work. None but the purest and freshest drugs 
are used and they are compounded with the ut- 
most care and skill. In fraternal relations Mr. 
Cyr is identified with the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He was married in Butte, on November 
24, 1898, to Miss Maud Martin, daughter of James 
and Ozita Martin, who are conducting a productive 
farm near Missoula. They have a little daughter. 
May. 



pHRISTOPHER C. DAVID.— The subject of 
V-' this review has been identified with the in- 
dustrial life of Montana for nearly a quarter of 
a century, is one of the representative citizens 
of Fergus county and has attained success in con- 
nection with the agricultural and stockgrowing 
interests of the state. His homestead ranch is lo- 
cated nine miles southwest of Utica, and here he 
has a finely improved and valuable place, while 
his is the distinction of having erected the first 
ranch house in the county. 



Mr. David is a native of Richland county, 111., 
where he was born on the 29th of March, 1842, 
the son of Isaac F. and Celia David, the former 
of whom were born in Pennsylvania and the latter 
in Georgia. They were pioneers of Illinois and 
in 1846 they removed as pioneers to Wisconsin, 
then a territory, where they developed a fine farm. 
Both were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and lived lives of usefulness and honor 
and died in the fullness of years. Of their eight 
children three have passed away, Reason R., Mc- 
Clure and Lester, the survivors being: Dr. Jos- 
eph, Christopher C, Frank A., Dr. Oscar F. and 
Mary J. 

Christopher C. David had excellent educational 
advantages in the graded schools of Wisconsin 
and in the academy at Platteville, that, state, where 
he was a student for two years. He early aided 
in the operations of the farm, but he had not yet 
attained his majority when the Civil war occurred, 
and in 1861 he enlisted as a private in Company B, 
Thirtieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He was 
elected first lieutenant of his company, but feeling 
that he was too young and too unskilled to proper- 
ly discharge the duties of the office he did not ac- 
cept the preferment. He was, however, made head 
clerk in the mustering office of the department 
of Kentucky, while he served for three years, a 
part of the time at Gen. Pope's headquarters. At 
the close of the war Mr. David received an hon- 
orable discharge and returned to Wisconsin, where 
he conducted farming for two years. He then 
engaged in quite successful merchandising and 
mining in that state for ten years, though the 
closing of the mines caused him financial loss. 

In 1878 Mr. David came to Montana, and for 
one year served as clerk at Fort Belknap, 
under Maj. Lincoln. In 1879 he joined the Yogo 
stampede, owing to the discovery of gold in this 
section Here Mr. David secured mining claims, 
and also became the owner of a one-eighth inter- 
est in the old Barker mines, at Barker. Finally he 
took up homestead and timber claims at his pres- 
ent home, nine miles southwest of Utica, and to 
this tract he has added until he owns an estate 
of 1,280 acres, while he leases an equal amount of 
land. Here he engaged in raising cattle quite ex- 
tensively until 1891, when he turned his atten- 
tion to sheepgrowing, and became one of the lead- 
ing sheep men of this section. He disposed of 
this stock in the fall of 1900. He is now devoting 
his attention to sheep, horses, cattle and general 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1043 



agriculture. He was the first man to plow ground 
in Fergus county for the purpose of cultivation, 
and thus he may be properly termed the father 
of agriculture in this section. The political sup- 
port of Mr. David is actively given to the Demo- 
cratic party. He is an Odd Fellow, and with his 
wife adheres to the faith of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

On the 21 St of September, 1865, Mr. David was 
united in marriage to Miss Amanda Ellsworth, 
who was born in New York, as were also .her 
parents, John and Eliza Ellsworth, who emigrated 
thence to Wisconsin in 1844 and where they are 
still residents, the father being a farmer by occu- 
pation. They have eight children, namely : Henry, 
Amanda, John, Reuben, Eliza, Elmer, Mary and 
Rachel. John and Eliza David became the par- 
ents of six children, of whom Ada and Christopher 
J. are deceased, while those surviving are Edith, 
Eliza, Isaac F. and Delia. 



HENRY B. DAVIS.— Now incumbent of the 
important office of chairman of the board of 
county commissioners of Powell county, which 
was created by enactment of the last legislative 
assembly of the state, Mr. Davis has been in 
many ways intimately identified with the offcial 
and industrial functions that have advanced the 
progress and material prosperity of Montana. He 
is one of the representative citizens of Deer Lodge 
the county seat of Powell county, and is known as 
a man of business acumen and executive talent. 
He was born in Wayne county, Ky., on August 
i(), 1855, the son of Thomas and Emaline (Hul- 
laker) Davis, both of whom were Kentuckians 
by birth. In the agnatic line the genealogy traces 
to stanch Welsh derivation, the original American 
ancestors having emigrated to Virginia in the 
early Colonial epoch, and two brothers of the 
paternal great-grandfather of Mr. Davis did val- 
iant service in the Continental army of the Revo- 
lution. The mother of Mr. Davis was of German 
Hneage, and from records e.xtant the genealogy 
is traced to ancestors who have been for genera- 
tions established in the quaint old city of Frank- 
fort-on-the-Main. Thomas Davis was a farmer, 
who in 1857 brought his family from Kentucky 
to Putnam county, Mo., where he still maintains 
his home at Unionville, retired from active busi- 
ness. His devoted wife remains with him in the 



close companionship which has been cemented and 
glorified by the long years of their wedded life. 

Henry B. Davis was about two years of age 
at the removal to Missouri, and there his early edu- 
cation was received, while he was reared to the 
sturdy life of the farm. He completed a course 
in the Unionville high school, after which he at- 
tended the Missouri State University at Columbia, 
where he was graduated with the class of 1879. 
He had prepared himself for civil engineering by 
technical study and practical work while at college, 
and he was soon engaged with a party of engineers 
in locating railroad lines in Iowa and Missouri. 
In the spring of 1881 he entered the employ of 
the Northern Pacific as assistant engineer in the 
locating and construction of the Rocky Mountain 
division of that railroad, and was thus engaged 
until the completion of the division in 1883. He 
had charge of the construction of the portion of 
the line between the Mullan tunnel and Helena, 
including the Iron Ridge tunnel, under the gen- 
eral supervision of Col. Dodge, the chief engi- 
neer. This was one of the most difficult sections 
of the entire road to construct, and the responsible 
work entrusted to Mr. Davis stands in distinctive 
evidence of his abihty as an engineer and of the 
confidence reposed in him as an executive. After 
the completion of his contract with the Northern 
Pacific Mr. Davis became interested in the sheep 
business in Deer Lodge county, in which enter- 
prise he associated himself with Charles H. Will- 
iams, under the firm name of Davis & Williams, 
and this relationship has ever since obtained, hav- 
ing been mutually pleasant and profitable. Mr. 
Davis then took up his residence in the village 
of Deer Lodge, where he has since made his home. 
In 1884 he received his first government con- 
tract for the surveying of pubHc lands, being then 
appointed United States deputy surveyor, his work 
being the surveying of portions of the public do- 
main in the northern part of Montana. He has 
since been called upon to do more or less work 
in this line each summer, and has rendered very 
efficient service. In 1885 he was appointed county 
surveyor of Deer Lodge county, and was later 
elected to that office, serving consecutively in that 
capacity for about thirteen years. In 1891 he was 
elected mayor of the city of Deer Lodge, serving 
one term and giving a most careful and discrim- 
inating administration. 

On the organization of Powell county, by its 
segregation from Deer Lodge county in 1901, 



PROGRESSIJ-E MEX OF MONTANA. 



Mr. Davis was appointed county commissioner of 
the new count}', by provision of the legislative 
enactment which created the county, and his term 
extends to the next general election, which will be 
the first held in the county. Upon the assembUng 
of the board Mr. Davis was made chairman of the 
body, and in this capacity he is devoting much time 
and labor to the exacting work which naturally 
devolves upon the board. Mr. Davis is an ardent 
supporter of the principles of the Democratic 
party, and fraternally he is a member of the Ma- 
sonic order. He is still extensively engaged in 
sheepraising, as a member of the firm of Davis 
& Williams, and at the time of this writing they 
have about 12,000 sheep, while they hold title to 
about 10,000 acres of land and lease about 6,000 
acres of state lands, all located in Powell county, 
north of the city of Deer Lodge. 

On September 4, 1889, Mr. Davis wedded Miss 
Lizzie B. Wolfolk, the nuptial ceremony being 
celebrated in Deer Lodge. Mrs. Davis was born 
in Lexington, Ky., on September 18, 1866, the 
daughter of Rev. Lucien B. and Elizabeth O. 
(Cunningham) Wolfolk, natives of Kentucky and 
Tennessee. The father of Mrs. Davis was a de- 
scendant of the celebrated Marshall family, his 
mother being the daughter of a sister of John 
Marshall, the renowned chief justice of the su- 
preme court of the United States. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis are the parents of four children, Harry 
B., Alexander W., Julian W. and Charlotte. 



JENKIN W. DAVIS, M. D., the leading physi- 
cian of Whitehall, Jefferson county, Mont., 
was born in Oshkosh, Wis., on February 16, 1864. 
He is the son of Rev. J. D. and Mary (Davis) 
Davis, both of Rymi, Wales. They emigrated 
to New York in 1845, where they remained for 
several years, the father engaging in the drygoods 
Inisiness. He also had charge of a Welsh church 
for some ten years. Here he was married, soon 
thereafter, in 1855, removing to Oshkosh, Wis. 
In that neighborhood he purchased a farm which 
lie worked in connection with his church duties. 
Later he removed to Waukesha, Wis., where he at 
l)resent resides at the age of eighty years. His 
wife is seventy-nine years old, and they celebrated 
their golden wedding in 1899. They have two sons. 
The mother and her father, David Davis, came to 
America in 1831 and settled in Bradford county, 



Pa., where her father located on a farm. Here 
he continued until his death at eighty-seven years 
of age, and to them were born six sons and six 
daughters. 

Dr. J. W. Davis received his early education in 
Dodgeville, Wis., and by earnest application ac- 
quired such proficiency that he was called 10 act 
as a teacher, which he did for two years with ability. 
In 1887 he began the study of medicine at Rush 
Medical College, Chicago, and devoted himself 
to the acquistion of the technical knowledge n.'(|- 
uisite in his profession for two years. 

In 1889 Mr. Davis first came to Montana, locat- 
ing at Butte, where he was engaged as nurse and 
resident physician for three years, in the Boston 
and Montana Hospital one year and in the Murray 
and Gillespie Hospital two years. He then re- 
turned to Chicago and completed his studies at 
the Rush Medical College, being graduated in 
1893. He then engaged in medical practice at 
Monroe, Neb., for six months, when returning to 
Butte he was employed as resident physician at 
the Murray & Freund Hospital, with which he 
was associated one year. He then removed to 
Whitehall, where he has since been permanently 
located in the prosecution of a most lucrative 
practice in both the branches of medicine and 
surgery, in which he is a skillful operator. For 
the past five years he has been physician and sur- 
geon for the Northern Pacific at Whitehall, and 
from the organization of the Mayflower Mining 
Company he has been their physician and sur- 
geon. 

In 1892 Dr. Davis was wedded to Miss Mattie 
West, daughter of William West, of West Vir- 
ginia. Miss West had removed to Wyoming from 
her native state with her mother, Mrs. Catherine 
West, and there her wedding occurred. They 
have one child. Earl Llewellyn. Fraternally Dr. 
Davis is a Freemason, a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, having passed the chairs, an Odd 
Fellow, in which he has filled every office in his 
lodge, and is a member of the Maccabees. Politic- 
ally the affiliations of Dr. Davis are with the Re- 
publican party, in whose various campaigns he 
takes a lively interest. In the November election 
of 1900 he was a candidate for the house of rep- 
resentatives of the Montana legislature, but a tidal 
wave of Democracy swept over the state and he 
was defeated, having polled, however, the full 
strength of his party ticket. The career of Dr. 
Davis in Montana, as elsewhere, has been such as 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1045 



to entitle him to the high esteem with which he is 
regarded. As a physician and surgeon his skill 
and ability have been justly recognized, and per- 
sonally he is a broad-minded and progressive man. 
In the municipal welfare of his home city he is 
deeply interested, and he is regarded as one of the 
liberal, patriotic citizens of Whitehall, while his 
home is a fine type of what an ideal home may 
become when dominated by intelligence, culture and 
hospitality. 



WILLIAM DAMS.— Fifteen miles south of 
Lewistown, Fergus county, is located the 
good ranch property of this well and favorably 
known farmer and stockgrower, who is a repre- 
sentative of one of the sterling pioneer families of 
the state. Mr. Davis was born in Muscatine 
county, Iowa, on November 8, 1859. His par- 
ents, William and Jane Davis, born in the south 
of Wales, emigrated to America in 1852, locating 
in New Orleans, La., and later removing to Iowa. 
In 1862 they crossed the plains to Utah, thence 
removed to Nevada, they having passed five 
years in these states and another in Idaho, whence 
they came to Montana in 1868. For the first thirty 
years of his life William Davis, Sr., was identified 
with coal mining, and in the Unted States he was 
the owner of coal mines in both Iowa and Illinois. 
While residing in Utah and Nevada he devoted his 
attention to freighting, and after coming to Mon- 
tana he engaged in farming and stockraising in 
Crow creek valley in Jefferson county, in which 
jjrofitable occupation he continued until his death 
in 1890. His wife is now living on the home where 
they first settled. He was a Republican in his pol- 
itics, and both he and his wife were members 
of the Josephite church. Of their seven children 
four are deceased, the others being William, Ann 
and Thomas. 

Though he began to assist his father in his busi- 
ness operations at the early age of eleven years, 
William Davis was accorded such educational ad- 
vantages as were to be had in the public schools 
of the several localities where his parents resided 
during his youth. He stayed with his parents 
until he was twenty-two years of age, when oc- 
curred his marriage. After a lapse of one year 
he resumed charge of his father's business and 
remained with his parents until 1890, when he re- 
moved to his present home and took a pre-emp- 



tion. Here he engaged in ranching on his own 
responsibility, said claim being a portion of his 
present ranch, which now comprises 320 acres, 
eighty acres is under effective cultivation, and the 
place has permanent improvements which show 
the energy and progressive methods of Mr. Davis. 
He raises cattle of good grade and has been suc- 
cessful in this line of enterprise, while he also se- 
cures good crops of hay, oats, etc., from the land 
under cultivation. He is a public spirited gen- 
tleman and gives his poHtical support to the Dem- 
ocratic party, while fraternally he is identified with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, holding 
membership in Judith Lodge No. 30, at Lewis- 
town. 

On December 31, 1881, Mr. Davis was united in 
marriage with Miss Emma J. Ross, who likewise 
is a native of Iowa, the daughter of George P. and 
Eliza Ross, the former of whom was born in Vir- 
ginia and the latter in Illinois. They were among 
the pioneers of Iowa, whence they removed to 
Missouri, remained a few years and thence came 
to Montana, where they have since made their 
home. They located first in Virginia City, where 
Mr. Ross was engaged in mining, as was he later 
in Helena, while he eventually located on Crow 
creek, Jefferson county, where he has since been 
engaged in ranching and stockgrowing. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ross were the parents of eight children, all 
are living except Nellie. They are John S., James 
W., Mary F., Emma J., Jacob W., Amanda E. 
and Caroline E. Ross. The six children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Davis are William E., Nellie J., George 
F., Henry A., Ethel A. and Stella G. Davis. The 
family are highly esteemed and Mr. Davis is known 
as one of the upright and enterprising citizens of 
this section of the state. 



T OHN DAVIDSON.— Born at Lochaber, Scot- 
J land. March 28, 1865, and bred to the business 
of tending sheep under direction of his father, 
who all his life has followed the time-honored oc- 
cupation of a shepherd, John Davidson, the sub- 
ject of this review, has pursued in the land of 
his adoption the calling which he learned so well 
in that of his nativity. 

His parents are George and Elizabeth (Renwick) 
Davidson, both natives of Scotland, and both are 
still living in that country. The father, as has 
been noted, has been a shepherd all his life, and 



[046 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



is still engaged in that peaceful and pleasing vo- 
cation. John Davidson was educated in the neigh- 
borhood schools of his native place, and when he 
was eighteen years of age came to the United 
States, locating first in Williamson and later 
in Coleman county, Tex., where he worked 
on sheep ranches for two years. In 1885 
he canie to the Tongue river, Mont., and there 
worked on the sheep ranch of John Barringer for 
a period of three years, at the end of which he 
took up his present homestead on the Rosebud 
river, located three miles from the Cheyenne res- 
ervation and fifty-five from the Northern Pacific 
Railroad. Later he took up a desert claim of 
forty acres, secured 200 more on scrip and pur- 
chased six sections of railroad land, swelling his 
ranch to 4,240 acres and making it one of the 
most extensive in his section of the state. Here 
he is largely engaged in raising stock and in general 
farming, his average holdings being some 8,000 
head of sheep, 500 cattle and numerous horses, 
while his annual crops of hay, grain and other 
farrn products are enormous. 

In politics Mr. Davidson has adhered steadily 
to the Republican party; and, although not an 
active partisan, has been called to public office 
by the voice of his party associates. He was 
elected pubHc administrator in 1898, but resigned 
the office soon after the beginning of his term. 
He has, however, rendered good service to his 
school district as trustee. He was married to his 
present wife at Miles City in 1899. Her maiden 
name was EHzabeth McRae, a native of Ontario, 
Canada, where she was born December 23, 1871. 
They have one child, Bessie Christina, aged two 
years. Mr. Davidson had been previously married, 
in 1890, to Miss Olive A. Richards, a native of 
Ohio. By her he had one child, a daughter named 
Edna E., who is now nine years old. He is looked 
upon as one of the most prosperous and progres- 
sive men in his county, and a useful and enter- 
prising citizen. 



WILLIAM DELL.— In connection with the 
stockgrowing enterprises of Carbon county 
the subject of this review has attained a distinctive 
success, and a.s one of the energetic and highly 
honored citizens of the county he is particularly 
worthy of consideration in a compilation of this 
nature. Mr. Dell is a native of Iowa, having been 



born in the old city of Des Moines, Polk county, 
on April 3, 1864, the son of Joseph and Theresa 
(Schmidt) Dell, natives of the province of Bavaria, 
Germany, the date of the former's nativity being 
March 19, 1832. Joseph Dell came to America 
in the early 'fifties, and soon after his arrival 
he made his way westward to the state of Illinois, 
where he maintained his residence about two years, 
his marriage having taken place shortly after his 
arrival in New York city. In 1858 he removed 
to Des Moines, Iowa, becoming one of the pioneers 
of that beautiful city, where he continued to make 
his home until his death, which occurred on De- 
cember 12, 1898. He owned valuable real estate 
in Des Moines, and was prominently concerned 
in agricultural pursuits in Polk county. Mrs. 
Theresa Dell is still living on the old homestead 
in East Des Moines. They became the parents of 
eight children. Those living are : Mrs. Levie 
Shepard, of Des Moines, Iowa; Mrs. E. R. Kind- 
ler, of Grand Island, Neb. ; Frank J. Dell, Louis 
V. Dell and John H. Dell, all cf Des Moines ; Chas. 
A. Dell and William Dell, of Carbon county, Mont. 

In the public schools of his native city WiUiam 
Dell secured his early education and there learned 
to be a compositor, but never devoted his atten- 
tion to the business since his apprenticeship. He 
was for a time employed in a dry goods estab- 
lishment in Des Moines, but in the spring of 
1886 he started for Montana, making Bozeman, 
Gallatin county, his destination. There he re- 
mained for seven years, and was in the employ of 
Senator C. W. Hoffman and James Henderson, 
influential citizens of that county. In 1893 Mr. 
Dell came to Carbon county and located on his 
present ranch, eighteen miles northwest of the 
city of Red Lodge, near Red Lodge creek, and at 
the head of Butcher creek, so that he is enabled 
to effectively irrigate a considerable portion of his 
ranch of 160 acres. Mr. Dell is energetic and 
progressive, and has made excellent improvements 
on his place, which is devoted to the raising of 
cattle and horses, and the raising of grain from 
the irrigated section of his ranch. He breeds 
more particularly the Hereford type of cattle and 
Norman horses. 

In politics Mr. Dell exercises his franchise in 
support of the principles of the Democratic party ; 
at the present time he is a member of the board 
of trustees of his school district, and maintains 
a lively interest in all that conserves the prog- 
ress and prosperity of the community. Prater- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1047 



nally he is identified with the Woodmen of the 
World, holding membership in Summit Lodge 
No. 328, at Red Lodge. On February 11, 1896, 
Mr. Dell was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Bunn, daughter of J. F. Bunn, who was born 
in Germany. He came to Montana in 1895 ^^'^ is 
a successful farmer and stockgrower of Carbon 
county, his ranch being located fifteen miles north- 
west of Red Lodge. Mr. and J\Irs. Dell have 
four children : Mary Josephine, Amy Virginia, 
Buelah May and Jessie Alice. 



LEONARD B. DIVERS.— Among those who 
have contributed to the development of the 
great ranching interests of Montana is Mr. Divers, 
one of the alert and successful farmers and stock- 
growers of Fergus county. His fine ranch prop- 
erty is located one and one-half miles east of Utica, 
his postoffice address. Mr. Divers has been a resi- 
dent of Montana for more than a score of years 
and was born at Warrensburg, Johnson county, 
Mo., on the 6th of March, 1851, being the fourth 
in order of birth of the nine children of Francis 
and Ann A. Divers, natives respectively of Vir- 
ginia and Kentucky. They became residents of 
Missouri in 1836 and there remained until their 
life's labors were ended in death, the father passing 
away in 1874 and the mother in 1876. Francis 
Divers was a grocer in his earlier manhood, but 
eventually turned his attention to farming, which 
engrossed his attention until his death. He was 
successful in this until the time of the Civil war 
which worked havoc with all industrial activity 
in Missouri. He was a stalwart supporter of the 
Democratic party, and his religious faith was that 
of the Baptist church. Of his nme children six 
survive, namely: Mary, Nancy, Leonard B., 
Frank, Vivia and Leha. 

Leonard B. Divers at the early age of fifteen 
years began to lend his aid in the cultivation of 
the parental acres, and remained at the home 
place until he had attained his legal majority, 
when he set forth to win his own way in the world. 
His equipment consisted of strong physical health 
promoted by his active outdoor labors, a definite 
energy and purpose, and a determination to de- 
vote himself to whatever work would aid him in 
the attaining of that purpose. When twenty-one 
he went to Nevada, where he received $50 per 
month in a dairy for one year. He then returned 



to Missouri, and for the ensuing five years carried 
on farming, the scourge of grasshoppers, how- 
ever, preventing success. 

In 1879 Mr. Divers cast in his lot with Montana, 
and he has never regretted his choice. He first 
conducted freighting business, in which he tra- 
versed all sections of the state and visited various 
settlements and mining camps in British Columbia. 
In 1880 he went to Helena, purchased a team and 
came to his present ranch, which now comprises 
440 acres, secured through homestead and pre- 
emption entries. In addition to the homestead 
ranch he also uses 1,280 acres of desert entries, 
enabling him to conduct business upon an ex- 
tensive scale. Mr. Divers has given special atten- 
tion to the raising of high-grade horses and mules, 
while he raises large crops of hay and grain. He 
has been progressive in his attitude, has adopted 
advanced methods and won success. His political 
support is accorded to the Democratic party. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias. 

April 6, 1897, stands as the date of Mr. Divers' 
marriage to Miss Cora L. Ridge, a native of his 
old home town of Warrensburg, Mo., and the 
daughter of Jacob and Fannie Ridge, both of 
whom were born in Missouri, where the father was 
engaged in farming and where both passed their 
lives, the former passing away in 1890, and the 
latter on the 13th of December, 1890, a devoted 
member of the Missionary Baptist church. Mr. 
Ridge was a stalwart Republican in his political 
proclivities. Their four surviving children are 
Ada, Cora L., Frank and Edward. Mr. and Mrs. 
Divers have two daughters — Cora L. and Fannie 
A. Mrs. Divers is also a Missionary Baptist in 
religfious faith. 



SAMUEL DEAN, a pioneer in the coal develop- 
ment of Montana, resides in Sand Coulee, Cas- 
cade county. He was born in Huntingdon county, 
Pa., on March 12, 1843, the son of WiUiam and 
Elizabeth (Mountain) Dean, who was born in 
the Shenandoah valley of Virginia. The father, 
a successful farmer, died on March 12, 1853. Sam- 
uel Dean was called from his attendance at the 
public schools of his native town when he was 
seventeen years old to enlist in the Third Penn- 
sylvania Heavy Artillery, which served bravely 
and with honor in the Army of the Potomac. He 
was mustered out in the summer of 1865, and went 



1048 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



to Jackson county, Iowa, to visit his brother 
James, and in 1866 he handled wheat in an ele- 
vator connected with a Pillsbury mill at Blakely, 
Minn. 

Mr. Dean first came to Montana in 1867 and for 
one season put up hay for the government at 
Fort Buford, when he returned to Blakely and 
again worked in the elevator. He drove a team 
in Montana for the Diamond R Company from 
t868 until 1869, when he again resumed work in 
the Minnesota elevators, continuing there until 
1 871, when he joined a surveying party on the 
international line north of the United States. In 
the fall he returned to Helena and was idle until 
1875 and then began mining in the Silver Creek 
placer mines. In 1876 he removed to the Boulder 
placer mines, and in 1877 began ranching in Prickly 
Pear valley, remaining there until 1879. In the 
fall of 1879 he visited Sand Coulee, but as he had 
horses at Helena, he returned thither and remained 
until the spring of 1881, when he returned to 
Sand Coulee. 

Here in 1884 he first began operating in coal 
mines, and in this valuable industry he has attained 
success. He now owns 107 acres of coal land 
and 160 acres of valley land, and his coal prop- 
erty is valued at $24,000. On July 6, 1891, Mr. 
Dean was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Dou- 
elan, of Williamston, County Galway, Ireland. 
They have three children, Ruth May, William and 
Florence. In early life the opportunities for 
achieving prosperity were not open to Mr. Dean, 
but he has lived to win prosperity by his own abili- 
ties and labor and the esteem and confidence of 
the public. In the coal industry he has not only 
a present source of income, but a wide field for 
future profit. 



HERMAN OTTEN.— This well known citizen 
of Fergus county has gained a place of promi- 
nence in business and industrial life, and is well 
deserving of that proud American title, a self-made 
man. He came to America from the German 
fatherland a poor boy, and the marked prosperity 
which is now his tells but the story of his success. 
Mr. Often is a native of Germany, born near the 
ancient city of Bremen, on the Weser river, on 
February 22, 1838. His parents, Charles and Mar- 
garetta (Kut) Otten, passed their entire lives in 



Germany, where the father was a farmer. Of 
their five children, Herman and Charles H. are 
the only ones of the family now living, and Her- 
man is the only one to take up his permanent resi- 
dence in the United States, Charles having re- 
turned to Germany, where he still makes his home. 

Herman Otten remained until he had attained 
the age of eighteen years in his fatherland, then 
courageously set forth to seek his fortunes m 
America. On his arrival here he was in truth 
"a stranger in a strange land," and also entirely 
unacquainted with the language of his adopted 
country. His arrival in the United States was in 
1856, and for three years he found employment in 
New York state. In 1859 he made the journey to 
California by the Isthmus of Panama and locating 
in San Francisco, where he was identified with 
various business enterprises until 1863, when he 
removed to Virginia City, Nev., where he gave his 
attention to mining until 1865. He then came to 
Virginia City, Mont., was in Alder gulch for a 
brief period, from thence going to German gulch, 
where he engaged with fair success for some years 
in hydraulic mining. His next venture was pur- 
chasing cattle in Texas, which he drove through 
to Madison county, where he located a ranch on 
the Big Hole river, near the present city of Twin 
Bridges, and there was in the cattle business until 
1877. Thereafter he was identified with the same 
line in Silver Bow county until 1888, when he 
came to Fergus county, where he has since main- 
tained his home. He located at Cottonwood, 
where he still resides on a finely improved ranch 
of 3,200 acres and continues to raise cattle upon an 
extensive scale. He also opened a general store 
at Cottonwood, of which he is still proprietor. 
Mr. Otten's stock and financial interests are now 
of wide scope and importance, and he is recognized 
as one of the leading capitalists of this section of 
the state. He is president of the Judith Basin 
Bank, at Lewistown, and one of its principal stock- 
holders. Of this bank a detailed description is en- 
tered on other pages of this work. Always a Re- 
publican, he has always refused to be considered 
in connection with any political ofifiice. He is ever 
ready to lend his aid and influence to worthy ob- 
jects, and is a generous and public spirited citizen. 

In the city of New York, on the 17th of June, 
1877, Mr. Otten was united in marriage to Miss 
Lizzie Ranges, who was bom in Germany, and they 
are the parents of five children, Annie (now the 
wife of Wm. M. Blackford, Esq., of Lewistown), 




^^^^a^/i Cm£:^ 



£^H>- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1049 



Herman C, Lizzie, Henry and Ella. Mrs. Otten 
is a worthy helpmeet to her husband and her 
strength of character and practical abilit}- have 
been strong factors in his success. 



T EPPERSON D. DOGGETT.— To trace the life 
J of an active business man who was born in Mon- 
tana is a privilege accorded to few. In the case of 
this representative citizen of Broadwater county, 
J. D. Doggett, we have one who was not only born 
at Virginia City, on October 31, 1863, but is the 
eldest white male born in this part of the country. 
As a prosperous ranchman he is well and favorably 
known and maintains his residence at Canton, near 
Townsend. He is the son of Moses Doggett, a na- 
tive of Kentucky, and his wife, Susan (Rose) Dog- 
gett, who was born in Illinois. Moses Doggett, at 
the age of six years, accompanied his parents to 
Indiana, where he attained manhood and was edu- 
cated. About that time his father, James S. Dog- 
gett, took up a large tract of land in Iowa, later 
giving to each son a cleared 160 acres. Moses 
remained on his farm until he went to Pike's Peak. 
James S. Doggett was a Virginian and from that 
state removed to Kentucky, as a young man, and 
was an overseer on plantations. He married in 
Kentucky and later became a citizen of Indiana and 
still later of Iowa, from which state he went to 
Colorado. He was a man of great ability and served 
in the legislatures of both Indiana and Iowa with 
great acceptability. His wife died in Colorado and 
he then went to Nebraska where his death occurred. 
In the spring of 1859 Moses Doggett left Iowa for 
Pike's Peak, where he was a miner for three and 
one-half years, then returning to Iowa. 

In the spring of 1863 he removed from Iowa to 
Montana. The family enjoyed a pleasant trip across 
the plains, arriving at Horse Prairie in August, 
1863, and shortly afterwards removed to Virginia 
City, Madison county. Here Mr. Doggett engaged 
in mining and here his son, Jefferson, was born 
amid the industrious bustle and excitement of a 
western mining camp, in the spring of 1865. The 
family passed the summer in Helena, in the fall go- 
ing to Missouri valley. Moses Doggett here took 
up a homestead and engaged in ranching until his 
death in 1895. His family consisted of seven chil- 
dren : Charles B.,born in Iowa ; Jefferson D. ; James 
S., born near Virginia City ; L. R., who has been 
mining in the Klondike country for three years ; 



Ida M., now R'Irs. Lling, living in Hassel, Mont., 
and B. P. and Lillian, both residents of Townsend. 
On November 18, 1896, Jefiferson D. Doggett 
was united in marriage with Miss Amelia Schreiber, 
a native of Pomeroy, Ohio. Her father dying 
while she was of tender years she came to Diamond 
City, where she had a brother engaged in the mer- 
cantile business. In 1898 Mr. Doggett purchased 
the Tinsley ranch, his present home. It is a beau- 
tiful place and here he is profitably engaged in 
sheepraising, and has just completed an elegant 
residence with modern improvements. All the 
surroundings of the home have an air of prosperity, 
and the ranch is well equipped for the business. 
Mr. Doggett is a member of Broadwater Lodge No. 
34, K. of P., of Townsend, and m politics is a 
strong Republican. 



TAMES H. DONLIN.— Prominently identified 
J with a line of industrial activity which ever has 
important bearing on the development of any com- 
munity, that of contracting and building, Mr. Don- 
lin is recognized as one of the progressive and in- 
fluential citizens of Great Palls. He was born on 
a farm in Susquehanna county. Pa., on July 21, 
1861. His father, John Donlin, was likewise born 
in Susquehanna county, and there passed his en- 
tire life as a farmer, his death occurring in 1883. 
He was a son of John Donlin, who, born at Easton, 
Pa., became a farmer in Susquehanna county until 
his death. His father was a native of Ireland, 
whence he emigrated to America at an early day, 
locating in Pennsylvania. His wife was born in 
Philadelphia, of Irish lineage and her maiden name 
was Mary Pox. She now makes her home with 
her children in Scranton, Pa. 

James H. Donlin received the advantages of the 
public schools of Auburn, Pa., and also assisted in 
the work of the parental homestead. When eight- 
een he associated himself with his brothers John 
and Thomas, in contracting and building at Au- 
burn, Pa., where they remained a short time and 
then transferred their activities to St. Paul, Minn., 
where they operated until 1891. Then Mr. Don- 
lin came to Great Falls, Mont., where he has since 
been successfully and prominently engaged in con- 
tracting and building. Among the more import- 
ant buildings he has erected here are the Vaughn 
block, the McKnight block, the old courthouse, 
the two Conrad buildings on Central avenue and 



1050 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Fourth street, and the central high school, while 
many fine private residences stand in evidence of 
his skill. He ever maintained a public-spirited at- 
titude and is ready to help every normal project 
to promote the interests of the city and county. 
Mr. Donlin has been an active worker in the Dem- 
ocratic cause, and is recognized as one of the 
wheelhorses of the party in Cascade county. At 
St. Paul, Minn., on September 5, 1880, Mr. Donlin 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary Flynn, 
whose father, William Flynn, is an extensive 
farmer in Fillmore county, in that state. They 
have an attractive home in Great Falls, where a 
gracious welcome is ever extended to their many 
friends. 



ANTHONY DOUGHERTY.— The career of 
the subject of this review has been a peculiarly 
eventful one, and his experiences, if recorded in 
detail, would make an interesting volume. Mr. 
Dougherty has the typical characteristics of the 
higher element of the Irish race, both of his parents 
having been natives of the Emerald Isle, in the 
northern part of which the Doughertys were origi- 
nally a ruling race. Our subject is a native of the 
city of Brooklyn, N. Y., where he was born on 
January 6, 1855, the son of Patrick J. and Cather- 
ine (O'Donnell) Dougherty, who came to the 
United States about the year 1835. The father was 
a tanner by trade, but after his arrival in Brooklyn 
he was successfully engaged in the boot and shoe 
business. Anthony attended the public schools until 
he had reached the age of twelve years, when his 
alert and self-reliant nature led him to start out in 
life on his own responsibility, which he did by ship- 
ping as a cabin boy on a steamer, making eight 
trips between New York and Glasgow and Liver- 
pool, serving on the White Star, the Anchor and 
the Allen lines. At the age of thirteen he was 
left in Glasgow, Scotland, where he remained five 
years, working during the day in the wholesale 
liquor establishment of Archibald Arnold & Sons, 
and in the evening utilizing his time to good ad- 
vantage by attending school. Two years later he se- 
cured a position as fireman on the Caledonia Rail- 
road, eventually being promoted to the position of 
ticket collector. This life not satisfying the ambi- 
tious youth, he sought new fields, shipping as as- 
sistant ship's baker, and thus visited Australia and 
New Zealand. He next made a few trips on coast- 
ing vessels running to Belgium. Returning to 



Scotland he enlisted in the volunteer army, and 
after one year's service returned to his home in 
Brooklyn, where he was variously employed for a 
number of years. Having always maintained a 
lively interest in military affairs, in 1876 he en- 
listed in the Eighteenth United States Infantry, 
was detailed to the medical department and serving 
three years. His regiment was in South Carolina 
at the time of his joining its ranks, and was sta- 
tioned for three months in the state capitol during 
the Hampton-Chamberlain trouble. The regiment 
left Columbia in the spring of 1877, proceeding to 
Pittsburg, Pa., where it was in active service dur- 
ing the railroad riots of that year. After remain- 
ing three months in that city the command went to 
Atlanta, Ga., in the fall of 1877, and was there 
engaged' in the work of apprehending illicit dis- 
tillers of liquor, or "moonshiners," until 1879. In 
the spring of that year the full regiment came to 
Montana for the purpose of building Fort Assinna- 
boine, where Mr. Dougherty remained until falh 
when he went to Helena with Gen. T. H. Ruger, 
being detailed for duty at headquarters. At the ex- 
piration of a year he removed to Fort Assinnaboine 
and was placed in charge of the quartermaster's 
department. In the winter of 1880-81 he accom- 
panied his regiment on an expedition in pursuit of 
the doughty old Indian chief. Sitting Bull, and as- 
sisted in capturing the impedimenta of the chief and 
his warriors, depriving the savages of property of 
no little value. He then returned to Fort Assinna- 
boine, where he received his discharge from the 
service, in September, 1881. Mr. Dougherty then 
determined to devote his attention to more prosaic 
pursuits, and, coming to Helena, he engaged in the 
hotel business on the Bozeman stage route, thus 
continuing until the fal of 1883, when he became 
identified with the same line of enterprise in Helena, 
conducting a hotel until 1890. He then associated 
himself with John T. Britt in the livery business 
in Helena, which they have since successfully cori- 
tinued under the title of Britt & Dougherty. Both 
gentlemen are known as enterprising and reliable 
business men, enjoying a marked popularity in the 
community. 

In 1881 Mr. Dougherty was elected second lieu- 
tenant of the Helena Light Guards, an independ- 
ent military organization, and held this office untd 
its disbandment. He organized Company C of 
the Meagher Guard, in 1886, being elected first lieu- 
tenant, and in 1888 assisted in organizing the state 
militia, Captain Ross Degan, of Company C, being 



PROGRESSIl'E MEN OF MONTANA. 



1051 



elected lieutenant-colonel of the regiment while 
our subject was chosen as captain. He continued to 
serve in the militia until 1892, when he was mus- 
tered out. On April 9, 1882, Mr. Dougherty was 
united in marriage to Miss Anna McKenna, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y.. she being a native of Flushing, 
Long Island. 



GEORGE W. DOUGHERTY.— A native of 
Fredericton, in the Canadian province of New 
Brunswick, where he was born August 21, 1852, 
subsequently clerk and buyer in a ship-building 
establishment, then engaging in ship chandlery on 
his own account, with all his thoughts going sea- 
ward, now the postmaster in a little rural town in 
western Montana, engaged in mining and other 
pursuits pertaining to the interior, with all his 
thoughts turned on and into the land, George W. 
Dougherty has had a wide range of vision in his 
half century of existence and has acquired from it 
a wealth of knowledge, spirit of progress and 
adaptability to circumstances which make him one 
of the most enterprising and useful citizens of his 
county. 

His parents were Gilbert and Jane (Drinkwater) 
Dougherty, the former a native of New Bruns- 
wick and the latter of Maine. George was the 
eldest of their seven children. He attended a 
good private school until he was fourteen, and 
then was two years at a high school at Blaine, Me., 
after which he served two years as clerk for a ship- 
building firm, being then promoted to a position 
which gave him charge of the yards and made him 
buyer for the vessels. • In this he remained for 
four years. Then forming a partnership with one 
Skillen as Skillen & Dougherty, they engaged in 
the business of supplying ships for two years, fol- 
lowing this with three years spent in the manu- 
facture of spools and bobbins. A year later, with 
his brother-in-law he began merchandising at 
Woodstock, N. B., in which he continued four or 
five years. In 1887 he came to Montana, located 
at Corvallis and for seven years was manager of 
the branch store of the Missoula Mercantile Com- 
pany. He then went into a mercantile business 
of his own and continued for five years in its suc- 
cessful operation. 

Mr. Dougherty is easily one of the most pro- 
gressive and public-spirited men in Corvallis, 
where his home is an ornament to the town in its 
architectural beauty and a credit to human nature 



in its domestic happiness and refined and genuine 
hospitality. He is interested in mining and has 
extensive real estate holdings in Missoula and else- 
where. In politics he is an active Republican and 
has been postmaster for the last five years. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Masons, holding 
the rank as past master in his lodge. He was 
married on September 12, 1878, at St. John, New 
Brunswick, to Miss Jennie M. Ruddick, daughter 
of Dr. William and Abbie Ruddick, and has two 
children, Rie and Edna G., to whom his home is 
indebted for much of its light and life. Mrs. 
Dougherty is well known throughout the town 
and surrounding country for her judicious philan- 
thropy, her activity in every good cause and her 
many social graces. 



THOMAS M. DORAN.— Prominent ranchman 
and merchant, and contributing in a leading 
way to the creation and direction of public senti- 
ment in behalf of every good cause for the ad- 
vancement of the community, Thomas M. Doran 
is one of the most useful and highly esteemed citi- 
zens of Ravalli county. He is a native of Wash- 
ington, Va., born on March 2, 1850, his parents, 
William C. and Helen (Leedy) Doran, being na- 
tives of Tennessee, who removed to Virginia in 
their early married life, and, in 1854, took up their 
residence in Missouri, where Thomas received his 
education in the country schools, until he was 
eighteen years old. For some years before and 
for two years after he quit school he worked on 
the farm with his father, then farmed for himself 
in the adjoining county of Greene until 1882, when 
he removed to Montana, locating on a rented farm 
on the Shalkaho, two miles south of Hamilton, 
which he conducted for four years. He then pur- 
chased 160 acres about one mile south of Hamil- 
ton, part of which he has platted and sold in one and 
two-acre tracts of the Doran addition. He has 
still ninety acres which he farms and constitutes 
his beautiful home, being well improved with ex- 
cellent buildings and the conveniences of life here 
attainable. 

In the 'nineties Mr. Doran engaged in mer- 
chandising in Hamilton with his son-in-law, R. L. 
Perkins, but sold him his interest in 1900, and has 
since devoted his time exclusively to his farm and 
real estate operations. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Masonic order and in religion affiliates 



1C52 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



with the Christian church. Mr. Doran was mar- 
ried on October 17, 1869, in Greene county, Mo., 
to Miss Mary Summers, daughter of Logan and 
Mary O. Summers, of that county, and has four 
children, all living in close proximity to the 
parental residence. They are : Mary E., wife 
of Alexander M. Chaffin ; Xora S., wife of 
Henry L. Myers: Edmund L., who married 
Mamie Wyley while he and she were school- 
mates at Valparaiso, Ind.. her home being 
in Wisconsin, and Katie L., wife of R. L. 
Perkins, Mr. Doran's former partner. Mr. 
Doran is truly a representative citizen and an orna- 
ment to the community which he has aided so 
materially in building up to its present state of 
progress and development, and as such is held in 
the highest esteem. 



JOHN DUFFIELD.— For a period of thirty 
J years John Dufifield has lived in Montana, and 
is one of the worthy pioneers who have labored to 
goodly ends, contributing in due measure to the 
material prosperity of the state. He is also one 
of the early settlers of Fergus county, where he lo- 
cated in 1 88 1 and where he has since been recog- 
nized as one of its leading farmers and stock- 
growers. 

Mr. Dufifield is a native son of the state of Mis- 
souri, born in Randolph county, on the 26th of 
}ilarch, 1849, the eldest of six children born to 
Frederick A. and Catherine Duffield, natives re- 
spectively of Virginia and Tennessee and repre- 
sentatives of proud old southern stock. Soon after 
their marriage the parents became pioneers of 
Missouri, where the father developed a good farm 
in Randolph county, where both he and his wife 
died. He was an ardent Democrat, and she lived 
her life in accord with the Presbyterian church, 
of which she became a member in early life. Their 
children were: John, Josephine, May, Benjamin, 
Julia and George W. The mother died in 1877, 
the father surviving until 1889. 

John Dufifield grew to maturity under the in- 
vigorating work of the homestead farm, and at 
the age of nine he began to hold the plow, and con- 
tinued to aid in the cultivation of the home farm 
until he had attained his legal majority. His priv- 
ileges of education were only a somewhat desul- 
tory attendance in the district school of his home. 
However, in the rears of an active and varied busi- 



ness career Mr. Dufifield has not failed to gain val- 
uable lessons through experience and personal ap- 
plication, becoming a man of good general inform- 
ation and mature judgment. At the outbreak of 
the Civil war his sympathies were naturally en- 
listed in the cause of the seceding states. Accord- 
ingly, in 1863, he enHsted as a private in a Missouri 
regiment of the Confederate army, and was in act- 
ive service until victory crowned the Union arms. 
Then Mr. Dufifield turned his attention to the at- 
taining of the victories of peace. He worked for 
wages as a farm hand until 1872, when he started 
for the long overland journey on the 17th of May, 
1872, making the journey to Montana with ox 
team and arriving at Twin Bridges, Aladison coun- 
ty, on the loth of September. Here he resided 
for five years, doing freighting, employed by oth- 
ers for the first two years, when he invested his 
savings in an outfit of his own and conducted a 
very successful business for three years. Then 
Indian troubles menaced operations to such an ex- 
tent that he sold the business. He thereafter en- 
gaged in ranch work, taking cattle on shares until 
1881, when Mr. Dufifield received as his share 31D 
head of cattle and seventy-five horses. This stock 
he drove through to his present location in Fergus 
county. His ranch now comprises 1,400 acres, 
and is eligibly located three and one-half miles east 
of Utica. Here he has ever since been engaged in 
farming and stockgrowing, increasing the scope 
of operations as rapidly as good judgment dic- 
tated. He is now recognized as one of the promi- 
nent and influential men of the county. His cattle 
and horses are of high grade. Mr. Dufifield "take.s 
active interest in the county and state, and is an in- 
fluential member of the Democratic party, while 
fraternally he is a popular member of the Knights 
of Pvthias. 



EP. DURNEN, proprietor of the Durnen 
House, of Winston, Broadwater county, first 
came to Montana in 1873. He was bom in Iowa 
county, Wis., on December 12, 185 1, the son of 
Thomas and Mary (Wall) Durnen. About 1846 the 
father came to the United States and lo- 
cated in Iowa county, where he was mar- 
ried, and later the family removed to Kan- 
sas, where they resided until 1883, when 
they came to Montana. They had four sons 
and three daughters. Mr. Durnen's early life was 
passed in Wisconsin, and he was educated at the 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1053 



public schools of his native town. He celebrated 
the Fourth of July, 1873, by arriving in Helena, 
Mont., at that time just emerging from the primi- 
tive conditions of Last Chance gulch. He had come 
up the Missouri to Fort Centon on a steamer, and 
from there by wagon to Helena. He continued on 
to PJoulder valley, now in Jefferson county, and was 
employed in ranching for the winter. Later he 
taught school fifteen miles from Helena. In the 
spring of 1874 Mr. Durnen went to ]\Iissouri valley 
and taught school, remaining there until 1877. He 
was then engaged in freighting, which he profitably 
continued until the Northern Pacific was well 
under way in the territory, and on it he secured a 
contract for grading. 

He found plenty of employment for his teams 
until the completion of the railroad, and then turned 
his attention to cattle raising and ranching, con- 
tinuing this for several years quite profitably. He 
then sold the property and engaged in the hotel 
business, at which he has been successful, being- 
proprietor of the Durnen house at Winston, which 
is known as an up-to-date hostelry and having a 
representative patronage. Mr. Durnen married 
Miss Annie Moran, who had come to Montana at 
the early age of eight years, on November 30, 1876. 
Their eight children are Thomas, at Iron Age 
gulch; INIary, Mrs. Henry Detour, of Winston; 
Hattie, Mrs. H. E. Johnson ; Maggie, attending 
high school at Helena ; Edward, at school : Rosie, 
William and Cleveland. Politically Mr. Durnen is 
a Democrat and an active worker during the cam- 
paigns, standing high in the councils of the partv. 
In 1898 he was elected county commissioner of his 
county, and he has been school trustee for a num- 
ber of years. He is popular as a hotel keeper, and 
highly esteemed as a man of superior business abil- 
ity and integrit}'. 



JOHN G. ELLIS, one of the successful and en- 
terprising young business men of Choteau 
county, is a native son of the city of Fort Worth, 
Tex., born July 25, 1868. His father, E. S. Ellis, 
was born in the state of Missouri, and accompanied 
his brothers, James F. and Menda G., to Texas, 
where they purchased a large tract of land, upon 
a portion of which the present city of Fort Worth 
is located. After about twelve years the father of 
our subject disposed of his interests at Fort Worth 
and removed to Menardville, Tex., where he was 



engaged in the stock business for nearly a decade, 
while the succeeding two or three years were 
passed at Fort Concho, Tom Green county, on the 
Concho river. He then returned to Menardville 
and there his death occurred on July 23, 1884. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Julia Howard, 
was likewise born in Missouri, but maintains her 
home at Snyder, Tex. 

John G. Ellis received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native city and in a private school 
maintained on the Concho, where the family home 
was maintained for some time. His advantages 
were limited, however, since he was but twelve 
years of age at the time of his father's death, and 
shortly afterward he went to western Texas and 
thence to the Canadian river, where he devoted his 
attention to herding cattle for two years. The fol- 
lowing two years he was in the employ of the 
Rumery, Kellogg & McCoy Cattle Company, at 
Snyder, Tex., and thereafter, for an equal length 
of time, engaged in the livery business in that 
place, after which he made a trip through New 
Mexico and Arizona, and then re-entered the em- 
ploy of the company last mentioned for the pur- 
pose of driving a bunch of their cattle through to 
the ranges on the Yellowstone river. Mont., where 
he arrived in the year 1890. For the following ten 
months Mr. ElHs was in the employ of the 
Slaughter & Kyle Cattle Company, and then en- 
tered the service of the D. H. S. Cattle Company, 
at Malta, where he remained from 1892 until 1893. 
In the spring of the latter year he made an engage- 
ment with the John T. Murphy Cattle Company, 
with which he remained until 1895, when he estab- 
lished a hotel at Rocky Point, on the Missouri 
river, and conducted the same until 1899. In the 
meanwhile he had invested in cattle and kept the 
same on the range in this section of the state. In 
the year noted he went to Landusky and effected 
the purchase of the Clark Hotel, which he con- 
ducted until June, 1901, when he assumed and is 
now in charge of the store and postofifice at Phil- 
lips, Choteau county, where he is now located, the 
place being about twenty-five miles from the vil- 
lage of Harlem. Malta is the nearest railroad 
point. 

In politics Mr. Ellis gives his support to the 
Democratic party, and for four years he was regis- 
ter agent at Rocky Point. On April 19, 1899, at 
Landusky, this county, Mr. Ellis was united in 
marriage to Miss Annie Reeves, who was born at 
Totney, England, January 29, 1869, who came to 



'054 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Winnipeg, Canada, in 1882, and to Great Falls, 
Mont., in 1893, being engaged in hotels there and 
at other points until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ellis have one son, Edward, who was born Jan- 
uary 31, 1900. 



TAMES C. EMERSON.— Among the able of- 
J ficials of Cascade county is Mr. Emerson, in- 
cumbent of the position of chief deputy under 
Sherifif Benner. He has been a resident of the 
state from the early pioneer days and is well known 
and distinctively popular. He was born on the 
homestead farm, in Holt county, Mo., on Sep- 
tember 30, 1845. His father, Robert G. Emerson, 
was born in Carolina county, Md., on November 
12, 1812, and in 1844 removed to Missouri, where 
he engaged in farming and stockraising, also serv- 
ing four years as sheriff of Holt county. In 
1864 he came to Montana, locating at Virginia 
City, where he remained until 1867, when he trans- 
ferred his residence to Helena, where he was 
engaged in merchant tailoring for seventeen years, 
while the following eight years he devoted to 
stockraising in Teton county. He removed to 
Great Falls in 1892, and there his death occurred 
on October 22, 1894. He was a man of sterling 
character and was honored as one of the pioneers 
of Montana. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Nannie Evans, was born in Virginia, in 1820, and 
died in Holt county. Mo., in 1849. 

James C. Emerson attended the military school 
at Oxford, Md., until he was thirteen years of 
age, after which he studied one year in Pleasant 
Ridge Academy, in Piatt county. Mo. In 1863 
he went to Colorado Springs, Colo., where he 
was identified with the stockraising business for 
a year, and in July, 1864, he came to Virginia City, 
Mont., and was engaged in mining and freight- 
ing for three years. In 1867 he located in Helena, 
from which point he had conducted freighting 
operations from 1864, and he did not abandon them 
until 1882. He freighted from Salt Lake City to 
Virginia City, and between the latter point and 
Helena, meeting with the experiences and dif- 
ficulties characteristic of the pioneers days, while 
his operations extended to various other points 
in Montana. A memorable disaster occurred in 
Helena on August 21, 1881, when one of his 
freight outfits, loaded with 6,090 pounds of pow- 
der, was destroyed by an explosion, the driver, a 



Mr. Shipley, and the team of fourteen mules 
being killed, entailing a financial loss of $5,000. 
From 1882 until 1892 Mr. Emerson engaged in 
farming and stockraising in Teton county, and in 
1892 he removed to Great Falls, where he was 
connected with the Boston & Montana and the 
silver smelter until January, 1901, when he re- 
ceived his present appointment as chief deputy 
under Sheriff Benner, in which office he is dis- 
charging his duties with signal ability and dis- 
crimination. In politics he gives unwavering al- 
legiance to the Democratic party. In Helena, 
on January 11, 1883, Mr. Emerson was united 
in marriage to Mrs. Rebecca S. Bowen, of St. 
Louis, Mo., she being a daughter of Peter Ruff- 
ner, of that state. 



JOHN ELLISON.— Seven miles from Big Tim- 
ber, Sweet Grass county, on the Boulder river, 
lies the extensive cattle ranch of Mr. Ellison, who 
is recognized as one of the most prominent and en- 
terprising citizens of the district. He is an English- 
man, born in Lancashire, on August 6, 1847, in a 
family of five sons and seven daughters. His 
parents, Henry and Ann (Swift) Ellison, were 
natives of Lancashire, as was his paternal grand- 
father, Adam Ellison. Henry Ellison was a farmer 
and with him John passed his childhood and attend- 
ed school. In 1870 John Ellison accepted a posi- 
tion on the police force of the city of Wiggen, in 
which service he passed five years, resigning as a 
sergeant. His father was then growing old, and he 
returned to tne homestead and assumed its charge 
for three years. Seeing an opportunity for an in- 
creased income he entered the service of the Lan- 
cashire & Yorkshire Railway, and three years later 
he was a train operator on the London & North- 
western Railway, serving until 1881. 

Mrs. Ellen Taylor, a sister, was then living at 
Fort Assinnaboine, Mont., and in response to her 
frequent and urgent letters Mr. Ellison came to 
the United States, and made his initial location at 
Bismarck, N. D. Ten months later he came ;o 
Glendive, Mont., to aid in the construction of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad and later he was in 
charge of a section four miles east of Big Timber 
until i88> when he purchased a ranch, located on 
the Boulder river, and seven miles from Big Tim- 
ber, from I. G. Cooper, to which he has since added 
extensively, and where he resides engaged in cattle- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1055 



raising, having a fine herd of Herefords. SelHng 
these in 1894, he engaged extensively in the sheep 
business and is wintering a large number for W. 
D. Ellis, and caring for a herd of cattle. He culti- 
vates large quantities of alfalfa, usually cutting 
300 tons each season. On May 29, 1869, Mr. Elli- 
son was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Rob- 
inson, daughter of Richard Robinson, of Lan- 
cashire, England. Two of their ten children, Ann 
and William Elenry, aie dead, the others are Alice, 
Mrs. Charles F. Morris, residing on the Sweet 
Grass river; Elizabeth Ellen, wife of Mr. Glen M. 
Parker, a prominent rancher; William Henry, a 
rancher on the Boulder river ; Arthur T., Maggie,. 
Frederick, Florence and Albert. Mr. Ellison has 
served as road supervisor and is school trustee, 
and each of these offices he most acceptably fills. 



A UGUST ERECKSON.— That Montana ofifers 
-TV distinct inducements to men of industry and 
ambition, affording them a means of winning a 
worthy success, is shown in the career of Mr. 
Ereckson, who is now one of the prosperous cat- 
tlegrowers of his section of the state, and who 
has gained some fine real estate interests in Cas- 
cade county, where he now makes his home. A 
native of the far-distant Norseland, he early started 
out in life for himself, has had many interest- 
ing and diversified experiences, and has at last 
secured the merited reward of his individual ef- 
forts — a handsome property and business and the 
confidence and respect of his fellow men. 

Mr. Ereckson was born in Sweden, on the 9th 
of August, 1850, being the son of Andrew and 
Anna Ereckson, both of whom passed their entire 
lives in Sweden, where the former died in 185 1 and 
the latter in 1859. Both were members of the 
Lutheran church, and by occupation the father was 
a merchant. Their son, the subject of this sketch, 
received only limited educational advantages in 
his youth, for he was but eleven years of age, 
when, in 1861, he went to sea as a common 
sailor, later being advanced to the position of an 
able seaman, while he eventually became a coal 
passer on one of the fleet of the Peruvian navy, 
being promoted fireman after a service of six 
months. These voyages were made to the various 
South American ports, and later seafaring trips 
took our subject to San Francisco, whence he 
shipped on the coast on a vessel bound for Vic- 



toria and Lima, locating on Puget Sound, where 
coal was plentiful. In 1876 he went to Butte 
county, Cal., where he was identified with ranch 
work until 1881, when he came to Montana, lo- 
cating in Cascade county, where he took up a 
pre-emption claim of 160 acres and a tree claim 
of equal area, eventually changing the latter to a 
homestead claim. In 1892 he purchased 160 acres 
for $500, and later exchanged this for city prop- 
erty in Great Falls. In 1897 he purchased another 
I Co acres for $500, and within the present year 
(1901) has made another investment of a similar 
amount, securing an equal amount of land, while 
he also purchased another town lot, for a con- 
sideration of $225. Thus Mr. Ereckson has at 
the present time a total of 640 acres of ranch land 
and two city lots, on one of which is a two-story 
brick building. All this is significant when we 
recall the fact that when he arrived in Montana 
his proprietary interests were practically summed 
up in the possession of two blankets. His ranch 
is located four and one-half miles west of the 
village of Belt, is well improved, and here he has 
been successful in farming and stockraising, while 
his life and industrious efforts have' gained him 
confidence and esteem. In politics Mr. Ereck- 
son gives his support to the Democracy. 

In the year 1892 was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Ereckson to Miss Sophie Anderson, who 
like himself is a native of Sweden, whence she 
emigrated to the United States in 1882, in com- 
pany with her mother and step-father, Peter Ol- 
son, and brothers and sisters and her own father, 
Andrew Anderson, having died in Sweden. She 
resided for a time in Minneapolis, Minn., whence 
she came to Montana. The stepfather and the 
mother, Augusta Ereckson, still reside in Minne- 
apolis. Mr. and Mrs. Ereckson became the par- 
ents of five children, namely : Alice (deceased), 
Ellen Augusta, Lydia, Helena, Karl Augustus 
and May Sophia. Our subject and his wife are 
members of the Lutheran church. 



fOSEPH ELMER, deceased, first came to Mon- 
tana in 1879. I^^ ^'^s born in England on 
October 15, 1829, the youngest son of William 
Elmer, an English farmer. Until he left his native 
country Joseph Elmer worked on the farm of his 
father. In 1850, accompanied by two brothers 
and a sister-in-law, he came to the United States 



1056 



PROGRESSH'E MEN OF MONTANA. 



and secured employment in New York state as a 
painter, which occupation he industriously fol- 
lowed until 1858. In that year he removed to 
McLean county, 111., where he passed nine years 
in farming, then in 1867, went to Bates county, 
Mo., where he continued farming until coming to 
Butte, Mont., in 1879. Here he engaged in team- 
ing for three years and then secured a homestead 
in Pleasant \'alley, Jefferson county. Later he 
came into possession of several other quarter sec- 
tions until he had a large and valuable tract, which 
was devoted to general farming and the raising of 
fine cattle and horses. 

On October 14, 1855, ^'^^- Elmer was united in 
marriage to Miss Catherine A. Englert, of Wayne 
county, Pa., born on February 21, 1840. The cere- 
mony was performed in Broome county, N. Y. 
She was the daughter of Adam Englert, of Phila- 
delphia, and Julia Ann (Smith) Englert, of New 
York state. The paternal grandfather had come 
from Germany and settled in Pennsylvania many 
years before. To Mr. and Mrs. Elmer were born 
eleven children, Wesley J., Uriah W., Lydia E., 
now Mrs. David McCall, residing in Whitehall ; 
Harriet E., now Mrs. Morrison, living in Madison 
county ; Martha A., now Mrs. M. Tuttle, living in 
Pleasant Valley, Jefferson county ; Julia M., now 
Mrs. Gist, residing in Medford, Ore. ; Edward J., 
Frank B., Stella V., now Mrs. Wade, and living in 
Pleasant Valley; Arthur and Charles H. Mr. 
Elmer died in 1895. For many years he was 
school trustee and was the principal factor in hav- 
ing the first school established in Pleasant Valley. 
He was highly esteemed by all with whom he was 
brought into association, possessing as he did su- 
perior intelligence and the highest probity and be- 
ing harmoniously in sympathy with all progressive 
and broad-minded views. His was a life of useful- 
ness and whatever the responcibilities he encount- 
ered he invariably met them with energ}- and an 
appreciation of his duty. He was a life-long mem- 
ber of the Methodist church and for many years 
served as steward. The cause of vital religion felt 
his loss as that of a standard-bearer in Zion's 
field. 



SA\TM R. LISA. — The demand of our country 
for toilers in her fruitful fields of productive 
enterprise, where work is plentiful and where work 
will pay, has drawn to our shores willing la- 
borers from ever\- civilized country on tlie globe. 



Among the number who have exchanged the vine- 
clad hills and verdant vales of sunny Italy for the 
mountains and mines of the great American north- 
west, is Savin R. Lisa, one of Butte's prominent 
and substantial merchants. He was born in Turin, 
Italy, July 7, 1858, a son of Joseph R. and Jose- 
phine (Bobba) Lisa. The father, a merchant and 
baker, died when Savin, the fifth of nine children, 
was quite young. 

Mr. Lisa attended the common schools at in- 
tervals until he was fifteen years old, making up 
for the interruptions by sessions of night school, 
and in 1873 he emigrated to America and worked 
in the mines of Michigan until 1879, when he re- 
moved to Butte and continued mining there for 
eighteen months longer. In 1881 he went into 
merchandising, conducting it at various places until 
1887. Then he opened an attractive grocery store 
at his present location, which he has carried on 
with gratifying success, augmenting his trade and 
widening its scope as time passed until it is 
one of the most extensive and profitable of the city. 
In 1898, in addition to this enterprise, he started 
a macaroni factory at Great Falls, and has since 
organized a company with $40,000 capital to inaug- 
urate a similar factory in Butte. This company 
recently completed the buildings and plant nec- 
essary for the business, and began operations with 
a product of 2,000 pounds daily. 

Mr. Lisa was appointed consular agent for Italy 
for the states of Montana, Wyoming and Idaho, 
on January 3, 1901. He also represents several 
trans-Atlantic steamship lines and issues tickets 
and exchange to all parts of Europe. He is still 
conducting his mercantile business at 63 East Park 
street, carrying: an extensive stock of wines, 
liquors, groceries and queensware. He also owns 
and operates valuable mining properties. In every 
thing he undertakes he is a man of energy and 
leaves no effort unmade on his part to secure the 
best results. He is an active Republican, and as 
such was elected county commissioner in 1894 for 
a term of three years. He discharged his official 
duties with credit to himself and with eminent sat- 
isfaction to the citizens of the county. He has 
also represented his party in conventions, both 
county and state, with distinction. He is a Mason 
in all branches of the order to and including the 
thirty-second degree ; is also q Knight of Pythias 
and an Elk, and a member of the Christoforo 
Colombo Society, of which he was the originator 
and served as president for ten years. Under his 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1057 



management it was the most flourishing and suc- 
cessful branch of the order on the Pacific slope. 
In this order he also founded the first lodge organ- 
ized in Michigan, and was its first president, al- 
though he was then but eighteen years old. 



WILLIAM ETTIEN.— The year which marked 
the centennial anniversary of our national 
independence stands as the date of Mr. Ettien's 
advent into Montana, of which state he is truly a 
pioneer, while this has been the scene of his well 
directed efforts during the ensuing period and he 
now stands as one of the extensive stockgrowers 
of Fergus county, where he is considered a reli- 
able and progressive citizen and one whose integ- 
rity is not to be gainsaid. Mr. Ettien was born 
in Iowa, near Burlington, in Des Moines county, 
on July 19, 1852, the son of John and Susan 
Ettien, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania. 
They removed to Illinois in an early day and, after 
passing a few years there, continued their way 
westward and located in Des Moines county, where 
they lived eight years and where William was born. 
In 1857 they moved to Madison county, where 
the father devoted his attention to agriculture 
for years and died at Los Angeles, Cal., on No- 
vember 12, 1901, at the venerable age of nearly 
four score years, and he was buried in Evergreen 
cemetery. He was a Republican until after Grant's 
second administration, from which time he voted 
with the Democrats. His wife died nearly twenty 
years before her husband passed away. Of their 
twelve children nine survive, Mary, Lizzie, David 
H., Susan, William, Amanda, James, Charles and 
Etta. 

William Ettien began to assist in the work of 
the old home when a mere child and his services 
were given to his father until the attaining of his 
legal majority gave him emancipation in harmony 
with the wishes of both, and he then learned the 
carpenter's trade, at which he worked for three 
years, becoming a skilled artisan. In the spring 
of 187s the gold excitement in the Black Hills 
drew Mr. Ettien to that section, and there he was 
for several months engaged in unsuccessful pros- 
pecting. He came to Montana in 1876 and for 
the first two years of his residence engaged in 
hunting and trapping on the Big Horn and Yel- 
lowstone rivers, meeting with excellent success 
and greatly enjoying the exhilarating sport. Fin- 



ally he went to Fort Custer and secured a con- 
tract for supplying hay and wood to the Federal 
troops, and also engaged in freighting to that 
point for one year. In the spring of 1879 ^r. 
Ettien proceeded northward to where Fort As- 
sinnaboine was being constructed, and there se- 
cured a contract similar to that which he held at 
Fort Custer and also worked at his trade. In the 
fall of 1879 the Yogo river gold discoveries brought 
him to the vicinity of his present home, now in 
Fergus, but then in Meagher county. He took 
up a pre-emption claim of 160 acres, twelve miles 
southeast of Utica. He "has now 800 acres of land, 
all but 80 acres being in one body, a part of this 
is the adjoining ranch of his brother James, which 
he has recently purchased. Here Mr. Ettien on 
his valuable estate is raising cattle of high grade, 
and also secures large yields of hay. Fortune 
has favored his energetic efforts since he came to 
Fergus county, and he is held in esteem by the 
best people. His political allegiance is accorded 
to the Republican party. Fraternally he is iden- 
tified with the time-honored order of Freemasons, 
as a member of Lewistown Lodge No. ^y and 
Hiram Chapter No. 15, both of Lewistown. 



T OHN GUS. ERNST, one of the prominent and 
J successful stockraisers of Cascade county, 
Mont., is a resident of Sand Coulee. He was born 
in Saxony, Germany, on June 21, 1848. His par- 
ents were John G. and Katherine Ernst, natives of 
Germany. The father was a night watchman of 
a railroad company until his death in i860, and his 
wife survived him, dying in 1870. John G. Ernst 
at the age of thirteen years began learning the 
trade of a blacksmith, and when sixteen he came 
to the United States. Here he secured work 
in New York city in a tin shop as helper for three 
months, and then began working for the Brew- 
ster Carriage Company as a blacksmith, contin- 
uing with that prominent firm for two years, after 
which he drove an express wagon for two years 
and next driving a bakery wagon for nine months. 
In 1868 Mr. Ernst came to Fort Shaw, Mont., 
where he was a blacksmith for two years, and in 
1870 he went to Fort Pritchard, Wyo., and was 
still employed by the government as a blacksmith. 
He returned to Montana in 1871 and, settling at 
Helena, he cooked at the Magnolia Hotel until 
1875. He then formed a partnership with C. 



lOsS 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Kinck. Until 1879 Mr. Ernst continued in the 
hotel business. In that year he purchased 260 head 
of cattle. During the winter of 1880, with pros- 
pering conditions apparently ahead of him, one 
of the severest ever experienced in Montana, he 
was met by adversity and he lost 130 head of his 
stock. In 1881 he located in Sand Coulee, where 
he has ever since resided in one of the handsomest 
houses of the section, profitably engaged in rais- 
ing cattle and feed. Of his 500 acres of land, 
100 acres are well cultivated. In 1878 Mr. Ernst 
married with Miss Elizabeth Pierson, of Kris- 
tanstad, a native of Sweden, whose parents were 
farmers in that country. Her mother, Mrs. ( )li\c 
Pierson, died in 1864, her father, John Pierson, 
in 1890. Six children have been born in the Ernst 
.family, two, Mabel and Ollie Katherine, are dead, 
while Jessie, Augusta Elizabeth, Henry and 
George are living. 



CHARLES FALEN, deceased, was one of 
the earliest of Montana pioneers, having come 
to the territory in 1862. He was born in Stock- 
holm, Sweden, on January 28, 1821, and died in 
Broadwater county, Mont., on October 29, 1896. 
For many years Mr. Falen followed the sea, but 
in 1862 he came to the territory of Montana, and 
in 1865 located a ranch in Jefferson county, now 
Broadwater, on which he continued in the occu- 
pation of successful raising of cattle until his death. 
On November 20, 1887, Mr. Falen married Mrs. 
Amelia (Grandolene) Carlson, widow of E. A. Carl- 
son, a native of Finland. Mrs. Carlson was born 
in Finland, on May 24, 1844, and immigrated 
to this country in October, 1887. She has a son, 
John Carlson, born in Finland, October 12, 1869. 
He came to the United States in 1880 and for a 
time made his home on the ranch in Broadwater 
county, but has recently purchased a ranch in 
Big Timber county. Mrs. Falen still conducts the 
ranch and homestead, profitably raises hay and 
cattle, and is quite successful in general farm- 
ing. 



ELLSWORTH EWART.— Mr. Ewart was born 
on September 30, 1861, at Akron, Ohio, of 
which state his parents, Robert L. and Mary 
(Young) Ewart, were also natives. The father 



was a soldier for the Union in the Civil war, serving 
three years in that sanguinary struggle as a mem- 
ber of the One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio 
Volunteers. After the war he settled in Mis- 
souri and there Ellsworth Ewart, the first born of 
the four children in the family, lived until he 
was twenty years old, attending the public schools 
and assisting in the duties of the home. In 1882, 
with very little else save health and adaptability 
to circumstances, he determined to make his own 
way in the world, and left the paternal roof and 
came to Montana. He located first in the Missouri 
valley, passing his first year in the state clerking 
for Raleigh H. Clark in his branch store at Cen- 
treville, and the next year filling the same posi- 
tion in the mercantile establishment of Davis & 
Shennick at Townsend. He then joined the cele- 
brated Coeur d'Alene stampede and prospected 
for some months. In 1884 he accepted employ- 
ment as clerk at the Rodgers House, which lasted 
up to the death of Mr. Rodgers, after which he 
clerked a year at the Windsor. 

He was then called to Missouri by the serious 
illness and death of his mother, and remained there 
three years in charge of the farm and returned to 
Missoula and entered the employ of Mr. Kennedy, 
who was conducting the Rodgers House. After 
eighteen months in this service, he removed to the 
Bitter Root valley under contract witn the Mis- 
soula Mercantile and Montana Grain & Produce 
companies to bale and deliver hay, which he did 
until 1892, then removed to Anaconda, where he 
had a teaming contract with the Anaconda Cop- 
per Mining Company that he continued to exe- 
cute for a year and a half. He then returned to 
the Bitter Root country, prospected for a year, 
teamed for a time and finally settled at Stevens- 
ville, where he was appointed constable to fill an 
unexpired term, at the end of which he was elected 
to the ofiice, serving also as deputy sheriff under 
B. S. Chaffin. He is now the manager of the 
Stevensville Hotel for the proprietor, W. H. Mace, 
and by his close attention to the wants of its pa- 
trons, his genial companionship and thorough 
l^nowledge of the business, he has made it one of. 
the most popular hostelries in the state. Mr. 
Ewart was married on July 2, 1896, to Miss Katie 
M. Huson, a daughter of Elijah and Alice Huson, 
lirosperous farmers near Stevensville. He is an 
active Republican in politics, and in fraternal re- 
lations is identified with the order of Modern 
Woodmen of the World. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTAXA. 



1059 



JAMES E. FAULKNER, one of the most enter- 
prising and successful stockmen in Jefferson 
county, Mont., was born in London, England, on 
October i, 1836. He is the son of Thomas and 
Mary (Martin) Faulkner, both natives of London, 
where the father was a gardener and florist. Of 
their three sons and three daughters, but three 
are now livmg. James E. Faulkner remained in 
London until his fourteenth year, and became a 
messenger for J. E. & T. Banning, sugar brokers, 
at quite remunerative wages. Young Faulkner 
had a brother who had emigrated to Kentucky, 
and, having saved some money from his earnings, 
he concluded to try America and that he did not 
require assistance from his parents. Accord- 
ingly the stout-hearted little fellow came to this 
country, joining his brother in Kentucky, where 
very soon he secured employment on a street 
railway. 

In 185 1 his brother was sub-contracting on the 
Maysville & Lexington Railroad, and gave James 
a position with him. Remaining in Kentucky until 
1854 he then passed one year in running an ex- 
press wagon from the iron works in Vermillion 
county, Ind., to Terre Haute. In the fall of 1855 
he engaged in feeding cattle, and in 1856 he went 
to Missouri, where during the three years of his 
stay he leased a piece of ground and engaged in 
raising hemp. In the fall of 1859 Mr. Faulkner de- 
cided to go west, and went to Colorado and en- 
gaged in teaming. While there he was employed 
in this business by the late George M. Pullman, 
of sleeping car fame. In the spring of 1862 he 
went on to Oregon. Here his initial experience 
in mining proved very successful, and in fact since 
Mr. Faulkner's arrival in this country, as well 
as in England, almost everything he has en- 
gaged in has well rewarded him. 

In June, 1863, Mr. Faulkner came to Montana,- 
a long distance to come, and in July of that year 
he arrived at Alder gulch. Those were the 
"boom" times, and like most he went to pros- 
pecting. He had come to the Treasure state to 
carve out his fortune and he had brought with 
him will and determination, superior intelligence 
and sound judgment. Since that period he has 
c^iutinued to be largely and quite successfully 
interested in mines, and he still has a heavy hold- 
ing in the "Pipestone" mine. Mr. Faulkner and 
James Ford were freighting in the fall of 1863 and 
one day, while driving along the road, they found 
the body of John Ross, who had been shot by "road 



agents," probably by some of the notorious Plum- 
mer gang. In 1872 Mr. Faulkner acquired by 
pre-emption a ranch on Big White Tail creek, 
and after selling this he purchased one of 400 
acres, which is now his home. He usually feeds 
from 200 to 300 head of cattle through the win- 
ter. For many years he has served as a delegate 
lo the county conventions of Jefferson county, and 
has for many terms been a school trustee and a 
road supervisor. His two brothers, George and 
Charles, were members of the Second Kentucky 
Cavalry, LInion, during the Civil war. Charles 
served through the war and was twice wounded. 
In the community in which he resides Mr. Faulk- 
ner is highly respected, and regarded as a man 
of superior business judgment and high integrity. 



UMLLIAM FERGUS.— One of the best ele- 
VV ments of our composite American life is that 
resulting from the immigration of Scotch agri- 
culturists. They bring with them integrity, hon- 
esty, a practical knowledge and a painstaking- 
industry and thrift that not only benefit themselves, 
but by their example tend to influence for good 
the people by whom they are surrounded. It is 
a proven truth that "blood will tell," and when 
these Scotch immigrants possess traits that come 
from careful education and nurture the force 
of character derived from good ancestry, one can 
confidently expect to find them leaders in this land 
of their adoption. Intelligent, thoughtful and pa- 
triotic, they become the highest grade of American 
citizens. Of such is William Fergus, of Fergus 
county, one of the representative stockmen of Mon- 
tana, a younger half-brother of Hon. James 
Fergus, a sketch of whom is published elsewhere 
in this work. He was born April 19, 1833, the 
only son of Andrew and Christian (Hamilton) 
Fergus, of Lanarkshire, Scotland. Both Fergus 
and Hamilton are frequent names in Scottish 
history. Along in the fourth century, a bloody 
war was being waged in Scotland between the 
Caledonians and their bitter enemies, the Picts, 
who far outnumbered the former. The Caledon- 
ians sought aid from Ireland, and one of the chief- 
tains of that country came to their assistance with 
well-drilled troops and drove the Picts out of the 
land. In their gratitude the Caledonians elected 
this prince the first king of Scotland, under the 
name of Fergus I. From him the numerous peo- 



io6o 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



pie of that name are descended, and with this fam- 
ily has been intermingled that of the royal Stuarts. 
So the Ferguses of Fergus county, Mont., are of a 
lineage proud enough to satisfy any aristocrat. 
Centuries make changes in conditions of families, 
and Andrew Fergus of Lanarkshire was not an 
aristocrat, but a plain, unassuming Scotch farmer, 
of strict probity and a devout and stanch adher- 
ent of the Presbyterian church, standing high in 
the esteem of his neighbors. Many of his immedi- 
ate paternal ancestors held the office of bailifT. His 
son, William, was thoroughly and practically in- 
structed in mixed farming and had good educa- 
tional advantages in the parish schools of Chapel- 
ton, Glasford parish. He remained in the neigh- 
borhood of his birthplace until 1879, and by his 
industry and frugality, and the assistance of his 
father, acquired sufficient means to lease a few 
acres and commence farming for himself in 1862. 
On June i6th of that year he entered into wedded 
life with a young lassie whom he had known from 
childhood. Miss Helen Hamilton, daughter of Will- 
iam and Agnes (Pate) Hamilton, whose people 
had been farmers in that locality as far back as 
tradition could carry them. The young couple 
began life with courage and hope. For twenty 
years they wrought earnestly and well. The high 
rents of farms were hard to meet when crop fail- 
ures or bad luck came to the tenant, and labor 
as they might and plan as they would, independ- 
ence was always out of their reach. Finally, as a 
means of releasing himself from the coils of a 
crushing system of rental, Mr. Fergus took the 
bankruptcy court as the choice of two evils, re- 
linquishing all hope of a longer life in Scotland 
and accepted the invitation of his brother James 
to join him in Montana. The years had brought to 
them nine children, and the family of eleven sailed 
from Glasgow for America, on the ship Prussia, 
April I, 1882, arriving at Boston after a pleasant 
voyage of seventeen days. They journeyed direct 
to Bismarck by rail, and then by boat on the Mis- 
souri to Claggett, now Judith Landing. It must 
have been a strange as well as a pleasant sensa- 
tion to be there welcomed by a brother who had 
left Scotland a few days after the birth of William, 
and whom they had never before seen. Accom- 
panying James Fergus to his ranch on Armell's 
creek, it was not long before the location of the 
present family residence on Box Elder was secured 
by purchasing the improvements of Nelse Stre- 
ver, a squatter, who accepted a nominal consider- 



ation for his rights, and a new farm life was com- 
menced. Mr. Fergus and his five sons worked in 
harmony and were prospered. Today the firm of 
Wm. Fergus & Sons has control of 10,000 acres 
of land on Box Elder, Dog and Armell's creeks, 
which are stocked with 19,000 sheep, 300 horses 
and 500 cattle, and make up a ranch which ranks 
as one of the largest and most productive in the 
county. This exemplifies the reward Montana 
gives to the work of sturdy manhood and untir- 
ing industry conducted on systematic and method- 
ical lines. Mr. Fergus was ably seconded in his 
plans and labors by his efficient and practical wife, 
who, after gladdening his home for thirty years, 
was called away by death on January 11, 1S92. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Fergus were members of the 
Presbyterian church from early childhood, and 
they reared their family in the fear of the Lord. 
Religious services are now conducted at regular 
intervals at the residence, which was erected in 
1899, and is the finest home in this section of the 
state as well as one of the largest. 

In political fields Mr. Fergus is thoughtful and 
patriotic, looking for the welfare of the whole 
country ; generally, however, finding his conclu- 
sions in harmony with the Republican party. He 
has kept a diary all of his mature years, and is 
methodical and exact in all the affairs of life. He 
has a good command of language, and can always 
give sound reasons for his opinions and support 
them by solid argument. He preserves all the tra- 
ditions of Scotch hospitality, which have not de- 
teriorated by his residence in the west. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Fergus are: Andrew, Ag- 
nes P., now Mrs. N. L. Landru; Christine H., 
now Mrs. David Hilger ; William H., who married 
Amelia Weidman ; Robert B. and James P., twins ; 
Alexander H., deceased; Ellen H. and Margaret 
A. E., now Mrs. John B. Rauch. Success such as 
William Fergus has attained comes not from mere 
luck; it is due to a combination of trained and 
skilled mental and physical powers, coupled with 
natural and climatic opportunities such as Mon- 
tana has afforded as a fair field for their activity, 
and is brought about in accordance with natural 
laws. 



f;j^ NOCH D. FERGUSON.— Of the pioneers of 
-/ Montana who made the memorable expedition 
into the Yellowstone National Park in 1874, the-e 
are few survivors; but it is known that one of the 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1061 



number, Enoch Douglass Ferguson, is now one 
of the iionored citizens of Bozeman. He is a native 
of Spring City, Tenn., born March i, 1844, a son 
of Samuel B. and Sarah- Butler (Wassom) Fer- 
guson, the former a native of North Carolina and 
the latter of Tennessee. Samuel B. Ferguson was 
a child when his parents removed to Tennessee in 
1818. His paternal grandfather was a soldier in 
the Continental army during the Revolution, serv- 
ing under Generals Perry and Newton. Mr. Enoch 
Ferguson has a Spanish coin on which is stamped 
the name of George Washington. Such coins were 
current during the Revolution, and the one referred 
to has been in the family from that memorable 
period, his grandfather havmg presented it to 
Enoch in his boyhood. Samuel B. Ferguson was 
an extensive planter in Tennessee, where he died in 
1886. He had four sons and two daughters, the 
four sons still living. 

Enoch D. Ferguson passed his youth in his na- 
tive state, remaining on the old homestead planta- 
tion until 1861, when he enlisted in the First Ten- 
nessee (Confederate) Cavalry, under Col. Carter. 
He was mustered in at Knoxville, and his first 
active service was at Mill Spring, Ky., where Gen. 
Zollicoffer was killed; he also took part in the 
battle at Stone river, Tenn., and in many of the 
terrible battles of the Civil war. He was taken ill 
and was captured by the Federals, but was parolcil. 
Returning home he resumed his studies, and two 
years later removed to Indiana, attended school 
one year and passed the next in teaching. He left 
Indiana in April, 1869, for Montana, and at St. 
Louis took a steamer for Fort Benton, arriving 
eighty-three days later. 

Mr. Ferguson soon took up a tract of land in 
Gallatin valley, a portion of the extensive ranch 
property now owned by him, and was the first to 
settle in this section. To his original claim he has 
added by purchase until he has an estate of 640 
acres, all under irrigation and of great fertility, 
and acknowledged to be one of the best of this 
highly favored valley. The ranch lies two miles 
west of Bozeman, where he makes his home, and 
on it he raises large crops of hay and oats, while 
he keeps about seventy-five head of high-grade 
shorthorn cattle. Mr. Ferguson also owns a beau- 
tiful modern residence in Bozeman which has been 
his home for a number of years. In 1874 he, with 
three others, located the Rocky Ford coal mine, 
Mr. Ferguson holding a quarter interest which 
he disposed of in 1884. He also located the Trail 



Creek coal mine, in which he still retains an inter- 
est. As a sterling Democrat he has been called to 
offices of responsibility. In 1877-8 he was county 
assessor; in 1893 he was a member of the city 
council, and has been a school trustee for a num- 
ber of terms. Fraternally he is a Mason, and has 
reached the master's degree. 

On June 10, 1880, Mr. Ferguson wedded Miss 
Betty Ferguson, born in Tennessee, the daughter 
of Mack Ferguson, a pioneer of Gallatin valley. 
Mrs. Ferguson died after eight years of happy 
married life, and on September 17, 1890, Mr. Fer- 
guson consummated a marriage with Miss Brunet- 
ta Lewis, a native of Kentucky and daughter of 
John S. Lewis. Their two children are Veda and 
Enoch Douglass, Jr. 

Reverting to the Yellowstone expedition of 
1874, we will say that Mr. Ferguson was one of 
the party of 150 men which essayed the explora- 
tion of that wonderful section of our national do- 
main. The company was organized by J. V. Bo- 
gert and Charles Rich, under command of Frank 
Grounds and EH Way, the object being to search 
for gold, rumors being rife of rich deposits known 
only to the Indians. They went down the Yellow- 
stone to the mouth of the Porcupine river, crossed 
over to the Little Horn, having daily fights 
with the Indians. One man, named Yates, was 
killed about three miles above the place where 
Gen. Custer with his command were massacred. 
The party returned by Fort Smith, and Mr. Fer- 
guson then made a prospecting tour, arriving in 
Alder gulch in July, and coming down the Madison 
river to Meadow creek. While the men were get- 
ting the horses ready to start Mr. Ferguson picked 
up an old gun to take a shot at some ducks. The 
gun exploded, resulting in the loss of his left hand. 



U1 M. FERGUS, one of the most enterprising 
and progressive men of Montana, is- a resi- 
dent of Whitehall, Jeflferson county, where he has 
built up an extensive and constantly increasing 
business. He was born in Port Huron, Mich., on 
May 7, 1864, a son of James and Ann (Connolly) 
Fergus, both natives of Ireland. James Fergus 
came from Ireland to the United States with his 
father's family in 1842. They located at Port Hu- 
ron and engaged in farming until 1882, when they 
moved west to Jamestown, now in North Dakota, 
where Mr. Fergus continued farming until his 
death in 1893. 



I062 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



The boyhood and youth of W. M. Fergus was 
passed at Port Huron, and here he received an 
excellent common school education. After partic- 
ipating in the family's movement to Jamestown, 
he entered into mercantile life by becoming a 
clerk. In this business he remained five years, 
gaining a wide experience and fitting himself 
thoroughly for the duties of merchandising. He 
arrived in Butte, Mont., on December 17, 1889, 
and at once secured a position as clerk, remain- 
ing in that city until JNIarch 9, 1892, when he 
removed to Whitehall, his present residence. Soon 
after his arrival in Whitehall he bought the mer- 
cantile business of W. W. McCall, and continued 
in trade until October 25, 1895, when he organized 
the Jefferson Valley Trading Company, becoming 
its general manager. In July, 1896, he purchased 
the stock and good will of the W. B. Gaffney 
Company, and removed the company's stock to the 
more pretentious quarters he had thus acquired, 
reserving the former store as a warehouse. 

The company has one of the most complete es- 
tablishments in Montana, fitted with all modern im- 
provements and every facility for conducting its 
large, extensive and profitable trade. Mr. Fer- 
gus was married on November 12, 1894, to Miss 
Julia C. Kellogg, of Kalamazoo, Mich. She is 
the daughter of Albert S. and Jane M. (Balch) 
Kellogg, of that city. They have had three chil- 
dren, Clarion G., Francis, deceased, and Gertrude. 
As a conscientious Democrat Mr. Fergus takes an 
active interest in all the campaigns, and is an in- 
fluential worker in the cause. In 1896 he was 
elected county commissioner- of Jefferson county, 
and has served as chairman of the board. In 1900 
he was re-elected to the same position. Frater- 
nally he is a Mason, a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, having passed all the chairs in this order, 
and a member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. 



GEORGE P. FINCH.— In all sections of the 
great west will be found men who have won 
success through their own efforts. Among this 
number we must count Mr. Finch, for he started 
out without influential friends or financial re- 
sources, and from boyhood has bravely faced the 
battle of life. That success should come to such a 
man is in justice due, for the untrained lad who 
overcomes obstacles by sheer persistency and in- 
defatigable industry certainly deserves such re- 



ward. Mr. Finch has passed practically his entire 
life in the west, and his experiences on the plains 
and in the mountains have been exciting and 
varied. 

A native of DeKalb county. 111., Mr. Finch was 
born on the 28th of January, 1863, the son of 
Martin and Phoebe Finch, who were born in the 
same state, where their respective parents were pio- 
neers, the father being identified with the milling 
and brick-manufacturing industries, and both he 
and his wife consistent members of the Methodist 
church. Of their five children two are deceased, 
Delia and Lizzie, the others being Hugh, Bert and 
George P. The father of Mr. Finch died in 1872 
and his mother in April, 1895. George P. re- 
ceived very limited school advantages, and is self- 
educated. When only seven years old he began 
to work for his board on a ranch in Nebraska, 
where the family then resided, and he was but ten 
years old at the time of his father's death. Re- 
maining in Nebraska until 1877, he went to New 
Mexico, where he found employment as a cattle 
herder with the Prairie Cattle Company until 1879, 
when he turned his attention to hauling logs with 
oxen in the Ratoon mountains. In July, 1880, Mr. 
Finch removed to Fort Dodge, Kan., where he en- 
gaged in freighting to Texas, being thus employed 
until 1882, when he devoted six months of time 
to the trailing of cattle from Kansas to the Powder 
river in Montana. Then he went to the Black 
Hills and drove mule teams for the Northwestern 
Stage & Transportation Company, receiving $40 a 
month for his services. In August, 1883, he en- 
gaged with George Baldwin in the same line of 
work, and had the distinction of making the first 
trip of 200 miles from Deadwood to the Little Mis- 
souri. He continued to be a stage driver until 
the -summer of 1885, having gone to Junction City, 
Mont., from which point he made trips through 
to Wyoming. Coming again to Montana, he en- 
gaged as night herder in the employ of "Arkansas 
John," who also had the contract for putting up 
hay for the government post at Fort Custer. 
Finally the Indians caused so much trouble in their 
efforts to steal the mules that Mr. Finch gave up 
herding and became a blacksmith at Fort Custer 
until the spring of 1886, when he drove logs at 
Boulder. In July, 1886, he became wagon boss 
for the large freighting firm of Gurney «& Woods, 
of Big Timber, and held this position until 1887. 
In the very severe winter of 1886 Mr. Finch was 
twenty-eight days in making a trip from Fort 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1063 



Benton to Stanford, being detained by the un- 
usually heavy snow. Thereafter he was variously 
employed until 1890, but in the meanwhile he had 
taken up pre-emption and tree claims on Trout 
creek, Fergus county, and engaged in raising cat- 
tle and horses. This enterprise he continued un- 
til 1893, and also continued his freighting business 
on his own responsibility. In 1897 he disposed of 
his ranch and cattle, and outfitted fourteen pack 
mules and acted as guide for a party of railroad of- 
ficials through the Big Horn, Big Elk and the 
Black canyon. He later engaged in handling grain 
and hay at the Crow Indian agency. In 1898 he 
returned to Fergus county and purchased a valu- 
able ranch property, which now includes 800 acres 
of land. He purchased in the same year 300 head 
of horses, and has since been successfully engaged 
in the raising of horses. His ranch is located two 
miles south of Garneill, his postof^ce address. In 
politics Mr. Finch is a stalwart Democrat and fra- 
ternally he holds membership in the Woodmen of 
the World and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
On the 22d of February, 1898, Mr. Finch took 
unto himself a wife, in the person of Miss MoUie 
Lewis, who was born in Missouri, the fifth in order 
of birth of the five children of Henry and Mary 
(Price) Lewis, who were born in Illinois, and be- 
came early settlers in Nebraska, where Mr. Lewis 
has devoted his attention to agriculture. His first 
wife died when Mrs. Finch was a year old. He 
remarried and both himself and wife are residing 
in Saunders county. Neb., and are parents of five 
children. 



BARTHOLOMEW S. FITZPATRICK, the 
present justice of the peace and police magis- 
trate of Neihart, Cascade county, is one who has 
led an eventful and adventurous life in many states 
and territories, including Montana, of which latter 
he may be classed as one of the earliest pioneers. 
It has been his fortune to witness the hostile In- 
dian at his worst, to follow his trail of ruin, mur- 
der and devastation, and to participate in one of 
the most important Indian battles in trans-Missis- 
sippi history. He was born in Ireland, December 
26. 1842, the son of Bartholomew and Mary Fitz- 
patrick. The father was a successful farmer and 
both parents were devout members of the Catholic 
church. In i860 the father passed from earth and 
was followed by the wife and mother in 1896. 
They are survived by seven children, viz. : Barthol- 



omew, Michael, John, Thomas, Edmund W., Sa- 
bina and Katherine. 

In the public schools of his neighborhood Bar- 
tholomew S. Fitzpatrick obtained the elements of 
a rather limited education, and he remained with 
his parents until i860, when he came to the United 
States. The initial part of his location in this 
country was at Kankakee, 111., where he engaged 
in general farm work for a wage of $8.00 per 
month and board. One year from that period he 
removed to Green Bay, Wis., where for three years 
he busied himself in the lumber regions, working 
for $30 per month. Going to St. Louis, Mo., in 
1864, our subject joined a United States expedition 
which was leaving for the Big Horn river, Mont., 
via the Platte route. The eventful days succeeding 
each other during this journey would provide 
material for an interesting chapter in a romance. 
Encounters with hostile Indians began soon after 
the party passed Julesburg, and they became of al- 
most daily occurrence. Chief Red Cloud and his 
fierce band of Sioux warriors continually harassed 
the expedition, and it reached Fort Phil Kearney 
shortly after the terrible massacre which took place 
on that scene. Here they found many dead bodies 
and other indications of a prolonged and desper- 
ate struggle. During the spring of 1867 
Mr. Fitzpatrick joined the John Greene ex- 
pedition which moved to the Big Horn river, and 
thence to Fort Phil Kearney, being fiercely at- 
tacked by savages, but they were repulsed with 
great loss. Indian camps were located all around 
them, and the soldiers, who were compelled to 
carry wood six miles, were placed in continual 
danger from hostile scouting parties. On their re- 
turn to the post Mr. Fitzpatrick for the command 
reported the situation to the post commander, who, 
with 100 men, armed with needle guns, marched 
to the protection of the parties who were engaged 
in getting timber for the government. This lit- 
tle band was attacked in force by the Indians, 
numbering some 10,000 warriors. But owing to the 
efficacy of the rapid fire needle guns they were 
held at bay, or, practically repulsed until the arrival 
of artillery, when 1,100 Indians were killed. Lieut. 
Jennes and fifteen United States soldiers lost their 
lives in this encounter. It was amid similar san- 
guinary scenes that our subject passed two and a 
half years. He then moved to Cheyenne, Wyo., 
and thence to Colorado, where for the succeeding 
five years he was engaged in gold and silver mining 
with fair success. On his return to Chicago he 



1064 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



was employed two years in the flour and feed busi- 
ness, and then went to Missouri. He afterward 
prepared to move into the mining regions of Mex- 
ico via New Orleans, but learning of the rebellion 
in that country he remained in Louisiana, and for 
two years was engaged in building and contracting 
on the canals and levees. In this line of business 
our subject was eminently successful, and made 
considerable money; but owing to the outbreak of 
the yellow fever epidemic of 1878 he returned to 
St. Louis, thence to Sioux City, Iowa, and from 
that point by way of the Missouri river to Fort 
Benton, Mont. He arrived in the spring of 1879, 
and the following winter he joined the Yogo gold 
stampede to the Bearpaw mountains, but the mil- 
itary force prevented them from prospecting to 
any great extent. During a period of eight months 
he was in the service of the government, following 
which he went to Barker, Cascade county, and 
did some prospecting among the Little Belt 
mountains. In this he was successful ; but shortly 
afterward he located at the place now called Nei- 
hart, and for twenty years he has continued pros- 
pecting and mining. 

Throughout Cascade county Mr. Fitzpatrick is 
highly esteemed as one of its most enterprising, 
public-spirited citizens. Politically his affiliations 
are with the Democratic party. He was elected 
justice of the peace at Neihart in the early days, 
but resigned the office after a year's service. In 
the fall of 1900 he was placed in nomination for the 
same office as an independent candidate, and re- 
ceived more votes than were cast for all of his 
four competitors, a handsome tribute to his worth 
and ability. He was later appointed city judge 
of Neihart by the city council, and he has held 
both offices since January 7, 1901. 



ANDREW S. LOHMAN.— In the respect that 
is accorded to men who have fought their 
own way to success through unpropitious environ- 
ments, there is an unconscious recognition of the 
intrinsic worth of a character that cannot only 
endure such a test, but also gain new strength 
through the discipline. The man who gains title to 
the distinction of having been the architect of his 
own fortunes is the one who can see and utilize 
the opportunities that surround his path, holding 
no obstacle as insuperable and ever pressing for- 
ward to the goal of success. Among the success- 



ful business men of Montana is the subject of this 
review, who has shown an invincible spirit and 
attained prosperity through honorable and worthy 
means. He started out in life when a boy of but 
thirteen years, his chief equipment being a modest 
education, but relying upon his own powers to 
dare and to do. He stands today as one of the 
representative stockgrowers and business men of 
Choteau county and a valued citizen of Chinook, 
where he took up his abode when the village con- 
tained but three or four buildings. Throughout 
his business career he has had an able co-adjutor 
in his wife, who has been to him a true com- 
panion and helpmeet. Mrs. Lohman has shown 
rare judgment and fine business ability, and her 
counsel has ever been held in the highest regard by 
her husband, who maintains that she has been an 
important factor in making his career the success- 
ful one which it has proved. Mr. Lohman stands 
today as the oldest resident merchant of Chinook, 
and in the progress and substantial prosperity 
of the town he has shown a deep and abiding inter- 
est, contributing in every possible way to the 
advancement of its interests, and commands the 
confidence and high regard of the people of the 
village and vicinity. Mr. Lohman was born in 
Shullsburg, Lafayette county. Wis., on December 
7, 1857, the son of Andrew and Mary (Conway) 
Lohman. His father was born in Hanover, Ger- 
many, whence he emigrated in 1842, locating in 
Wisconsin, where he was identified with the lead- 
mining industry until 1850. That year he joined 
the throng of gold seekers wending their way to 
California, and there located in Grass valley, where 
he built the second cabin and followed placer min- 
ing for three years. He then returned to Wiscon- 
sin and purchased a farm of 160 acres in the vicin- 
ity of Shullsburg, where he maintained his home 
until 1873, removing thence to Lyons, Iowa, and 
there purchased a farm. He is now living re- 
tired in the village mentioned, his wife having 
passed away in 1872. In politics he supports the 
Democratic party, and in religion is a member of 
the Catholic church. 

Andrew S. Lohman, the subject of this review, 
'was one of a family of thirteen children, seven 
sons and six daughters, being the third son. He 
was reared under the discipline of the home farm, 
where he remained until the age of thirteen, at- 
tending the primitive schools in a desultory way, 
as his services were early demanded in connection 
with the work of the farm, but supplementing his 




^i;^-^; 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1065 



meagre education in later years by attending night 
schools, personal study and reading, and knowl- 
edge which comes through practical association 
with men and affairs. In 1870 he left home and 
went to northern Wisconsin, where he found em- 
ployment in the lumber camps for two years. He 
then went to Central City, Colo., worked in the 
quartz mills and mines until 1879, then removed 
to Leadville, and worked at mining until the fol- 
lowing spring, when he went to Aspen, Colo., and 
thence to the San Juan country, still following- 
mining as a vocation. In the fall of 1880 he lo- 
cated at Durango, and there erected the first cabin 
on the site of what is now the flourishing city of 
15,000 population. Here he engaged in the manu- 
facture of brick until winter, when he started for 
Mexico on a prospecting tour, later locating in 
New Mexico, and engaging in railroad work for 
a time. He then returned to the San Juan coun- 
try, where he was employed in operating the 
hoisting engine at the Palmetto mine. In the 
fall of 1881 Mr. Lohman came to Butte, Mont., 
and was employed as hoisting engineer at the 
Modoc mines. The following spring he made the 
trip to Alaska, for the purpose of prospecting, 
and while there assisted in the erection of the first 
quartz mill established in that territory. In the 
fall he returned to Butte and engaged in operating 
the hoisting engine at the Lexington mines. He 
also opened a notion store and conducted the en- 
terprise for a number of years. In 1890 he became 
a resident of Chinook, engaging in the mercan- 
tile business, conducting a general store for nearly 
a decade, when he leased his store and ware- 
houses, sold his stock of goods and retired from 
the business, which he had developed into one of 
wide scope and importance. In 1900 he erected 
the Lohman block, a substantial brick structure 
of modern design and equipment, the lower floor 
being utilized for stores and the upper for resi- 
dence and office purposes. Mr. Lohman is ex- 
tensively engaged in the growing of sheep, owning 
four well improved ranches in the immediate vicin- 
ity of Chinook, having an aggregate area of 1,700 
acres. 

In politics Mr. Lohman has ever accorded stanch 
allegiance to the Democratic party and is one 
of its leading representatives in Choteau county. 
In 1898 he was the candidate of his party for 
state senator, but as the county's normal political 
complexion is overwhelmingly Republican he nat- 
urally met defeat, though he ran 160 votes ahead 



of his ticket. Fraternally he is a member of Hel- 
ena Lodge No. 193, B. P. O. E. His religious 
faith is that of the Catholic church, in which he was 
reared. On December 25, 1886, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Lohman to Miss Lily Mar- 
tin, a daughter of John and Ellen Martin, of Butte, 
and of this union two daughters have been born, 
Lillian E. and Mary Loretta. Mr. and Mrs. Loh- 
man occupy a prominent position in the social life 
of Chinook, and their pleasant home is a center 
of gracious hospitality. Mr. Lohman was elected 
the first mayor of Chinook, being elected in May, 
1901. 



GOWAN FERGUSON, M. D., a young physi- 
cian and surgeon of Great Falls, stands high 
in public estimation and was born in County Sim- 
coe, Ontario, Canada, on July 16, 1866, of Scotch- 
Irish ancestry. His grandfather was an officer in 
the English army, bringing his family with him 
to Canada in 1842, and locating in County Simcoe. 
TJiis included his son Isaac, Dr. Ferguson's father, 
who was then a mere boy. Isaac Ferguson was 
married in Toronto to Miss Emily J. Gowan, a 
native of Brockville, Ontario. She was a daugh- 
ter of Lieut.-Col. Ogle R. Gowan, of the Queen's 
Royal Borderers, and a member of parliament. 
.^11 of their six children are living, the Doctor be- 
ing their second child. Isaac Ferguson died in 
1889 at the age of fifty-eight. The mother, a 
member of the Episcopalian church, as was the 
father, is still living. 

Dr. Ferguson was early prepared for college 
and his advanced literary education was obtained 
at the Upper Canada College, and his medical one 
in the University of Toronto and the New York 
Polyclinic School, from which he was graduated 
in 1888, strongly equipped for excellent results in 
his subsequent practice. Dr. Ferguson entered 
upon his professional career in Toronto and here 
he was in practice for two years. He came to 
Great Falls, Mont., in May, 1891, since which 
period he built up a remunerative and an appreci- 
ative practice. Both as a gentleman of estimable 
qualities and as a physician of superior ability he 
is held in high esteem, holding also a high stand- 
ing among his professional associates. He is a 
member of the Northern Montana Medical Associ- 
ation, of which he has been secretary. He also 
belongs to the Montana State Medical Society and 
the Medical Society of Toronto. His qualifica- 



io66 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



tions for able work were enhanced in 1896-7 bv 
extended and thorough studies in the leading hos- 
pitals of England and Paris, including the Univer- 
sity College Hospital and the King's College Hos- 
pitals of London, and he has a high standing in 
both realms of his profession, having rare success 
as a surgeon. In 1898 Dr. Ferguson was married 
to Miss Willie Maupin, a native of Alabama. She 
is the daughter of Judge R. L. Maupin, of Mobile. 
They have one son, Robert G. Fraternally Dr. 
Ferguson is a member of the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Oiks and the Foresters. Aside 
from his medical practice Dr. Ferguson has de- 
voted some attention to real estate, in which he 
has some capital invested. 



T YCURGUS FITZPATRICK.— One of the 
L^ most respected and esteemed citizens of 
Meagher county, a thoroughly representative and 
public-spirited man, whose beautiful home three 
miles west of Harlowton is a center of refined and 
soulful hospitality, is Lycurgus Fitzpatrick, whose 
ranch of more than 10,000 acres lies for four miles 
along both sides of the Musselshell and extends 
seven miles south and five miles north from the 
river. He was born at Columbiana, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 19, 1 841, the son of John and Margaret (Albert) 
Fitzpatrick, the former a native of Ohio and the lat- 
ter of Pennsylvania. The grandfather, Charles 
Fitzpatrick, was one of the early pioneers of Ohio, 
where the family continued to live for three gen- 
erations. The ancestors of the mother, the Al- 
berts, were of Huguenot stock, and, when driven 
out of France, settled in Holland, from whence 
some of them later came to America and located in 
Pennsylvania, crossing the Atlantic in "the good 
ship Brindle Cow." The Fitzpatricks originally 
came from the north of Ireland, and were early ar- 
rivals in America. John Fitzpatrick conducted an 
extensive carriage manufactory at Columbiana, 
Ohio, and was a highly respected and useful citi- 
zen and a leading spirit in all movements for the 
welfare of the community. He was a strong abo- 
litionist and was active in the working of the un- 
derground railway. He passed his life in the town 
of Columbiana, and his family of eight children 
were all born and reared there. 

His son Lycurgus received his early education 
in the public schools of his native city, and after 
leaving school was associated for two or three 



years with his father in the carriage business. The 
father then retired and the business was carried 
on by himself and his brother, J. B. Fitzpatrick, 
until 1872, when Lycurgus sold his interest and 
started a similar enterprise in Findlay, Ohio. This 
he conducted for five years with success, then sold 
out and engaged in the drug business for three 
years, when he sold out and came to Montana, 
located on his present property and began opera- 
tions in the sheep industry. His location is par- 
ticularly well adapted to the industry. It is well 
sheltered from severe weather, has an extent of 
10,000 acres well supplied with water by the Mus- 
selshell which runs through it for a distance of 
four miles, making it highly productive, about 500 
acres being under close and skillful cultivation and 
yielding abundant crops of hay and grain. Mr. 
Fitzpatrick has a band of about 12,000 Merino 
sheep, and conducts his business so as to make it 
profitable. He has a fine residence, good barns 
and other outbuildings, with every device for the 
work of his ranch that is known to be of service. 
On June 25, 1879, he married Miss Eva Church, 
of Findlay, Ohio, whose ancestors emigrated from 
Wales in early Colonial days. Her parents were 
Chester and Barbara (Crumrine) Church, the for- 
mer a native of New Jersey and the latter of 
Pennsylvania. Two children have been born to 
the Fitzpatricks, Harold, who was educated at 
Shattuck Military Academy at Faribault, Minn., 
and is now an employe of the Mellville Mercantile 
Company, of Harlowton; and Lycurgus, Jr., who 
is at home receiving his education from a gov- 
erness. Mrs. Fitzpatrick is a highly educated and 
cultivated lady, and has taken great pains in the 
education of her family. After her graduation 
from the college at Findlay, Ohio, she accepted a 
position as teacher in the schools of that city and 
was rapidly advanced to higher positions, for some 
years previous to her marriage being the principal 
of the Findlay Normal. Mr. Fitzpatrick has 
mounted the Masonic stairway through lodge, 
chapter and commandery, holding membership in 
the various bodies at Findlav, Ohio. 



RICHARD J. FITZGERALD, the senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Fitzgerald & Foster, pro- 
prietors of the Gem restaurant, one of. the largest 
and most popular establishments of the kind in 
Great Falls, and one of the progressive young busi- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1067 



ness men of the city, was born on the parental 
farmstead in Minnesota, February 2y, 1861. His 
father, Richard Fitzgerald, was born in County 
Limerick, Ireland, in 1823, and emigrated to Amer- 
ica about 185 1, locating in Scott county, Minn., 
where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for 
about a decade, after which he removed to Minne- 
apolis, where was his home until his death in 
1878. Richard Fitzgerald, Sr., was married to 
Catherine McMahon, in Troy, N. Y., and she like- 
wise was a native of County Limerick, and her 
death occurred in Minneapolis, Minn., in 1897. 

Richard J. Fitzgerald, Jr., attended the public 
and private schools of Minneapolis, thus receiving 
excellent educational advantages up to the age of 
fifteen, when he secured work in the celebrated 
Wasburn & Crosby flouring mills, three months 
before this great plant was destroyed by a fearful 
explosion, supposedly of flour dust. Of all who 
were in the building not one was left to tell the 
story of the disaster, which occurred at night, Mr. 
Fitzgerald owing his life to the fact that he was 
on the day shift. Mr. Fitzgerald then became a 
flour packer in the Hinkle Bros, flouring mill, re- 
maining with this firm for eleven years, after which 
he formed a partnership with his brother, James 
W., and the two became proprietors of the Gem 
restaurant and a fruit store in Minneapolis, con- 
ducting them for three years, when Richard sold 
his interest to his brother who still continues the 
business. Mr. Fitzgerald came to Great Falls, 
Mont., in the spring of 1891, and here he estab- 
lished the Gem restaurant, being still associated 
with his brother, James W., who disposed of his 
interests to L. E. Foster in 1896, whereupon the 
present firm name was adopted. 

The Gem is one of the most attractive resorts 
of the kind in the city, great care being taken in 
the cuisine and in catering to a discriminating and 
representative patronage. The proprietors enjoy a 
personal popularity in the city, and this incidentally 
has an effect in advancing the interests of their 
ably conducted business. In politics Mr. Fitzger- 
ald has been an active worker in the local political 
field as a Democrat, and in the spring of 1894 was 
honored with election as alderman from the First 
ward of Great Falls, and was re-elected in 1896, 
serving one year of his last term, when he was 
elected to the chief executive office of the munic- 
ipality, in 1897. He served as mayor for two years, 
giving the city a capable and satisfactory adminis- 
tration. In July, 1900, he was a delegate from 



Montana to the Democratic national convention 
at Kansas City, Mo., and he is recognized as one 
of the wheel-horses of his party in the state. 

Fraternally Mr. Fitzgerald is identified with the 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, having 
been a charter member of Plymouth lodge of the 
former order in January, 1895, also becoming a 
member of the Knights of Pythias about the same 
time. While his business interests have been so 
inexorable as to prevent his fiUing official positions 
in these fraternities, he maintains a deep interest 
in them and is a popular member of each. Mr. 
Fitzgerald has five brothers and one sister: John 
P., formerly clerk and recorder, and now under 
sheriff of Cascade county ; Henry W., an engineer 
on the Eastern Minnesota Railway ; James W., of 
MinneapoHs; Michael R., clerk for the North 
American Telephone Company, at Minneapolis, 
and Katie, also of Minneapolis. 



ALFRED E. FLAGER, of Red Lodge, Car- 
bon county, Mont., is a prominent representa- 
tive business man and citizen, and is 'president and 
manager of the Carbon Mercantile Company, 
whose business is one of wide scope and import- 
ance. He has long been prominent in public af- 
fairs of this section, having taken up his resi- 
dence in Red Lodge prior to the completion of the 
Rocky Fork division of Northern Pacific Rail- 
road to its terminus at this point. Mr. Flager was 
born in the city of St. Louis, Mo., on February 
5, i860, a son of Bernhardt and Rose Flager, 
natives of Baden, Germany. The father of our 
subject came to the United States when a young 
man and located in St. Louis. At the outbreak 
of the war of the Rebellion he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Company D, Third Missouri Volunteer 
Infantry, and rendered loyal service in support 
of the cause of the Union. His death occurred in 
1866 in St. Louis. His widow now resides in 
Red Lodge. Alfred E. Flager was reared in his 
native city, was educated in the public schools and 
graduated from the high school. He gave in- 
ception to his long business career by entering 
the employ of J. &. J. Beaky, dealers in stoves, 
in St. Louis, with whom he remained six years, 
and was house salesman for some time prior to 
severing his connection with the concern. He 
then removed to Kansas City and became a sales- 
man for the wholesale cigar establishment of J. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



A. Bachman. At the expiration of one year he 
returned to St. Louis and entered the employ 
of the W. D. Gurnsey Furniture Company as col- 
lector, and a year later secured a position with the 
Greely-Burnham Grocery Company, starting in as 
private secretary to the secretary of the company, 
and was successively promoted until he held the 
office of manager of the city department, which he 
retained for several years and up to the time of 
coming to Montana. In January, 1885, Mr. Flager 
set out for Montana, and upon his arrival located 
in Miles City, where he accepted the position of 
bookkeeper for J. H. Conrad & Co. In 1889 
the firm closed out the business in Miles City 
and opened a general store in Red Lodge, placing 
Mr. Flager in charge as manager. During the 
great financial panic of 1893 the firm was forced 
into liquidation, and the subject of this sketch 
became assignee, devoting one year to settling 
up che affairs of the concern. He then efifected 
the organization of the Carbon Mercantile Com- 
pany in April, 1895, and was made its president 
and general manager, and is still its business head. 
The Carbon Mercantile Company conducts a gen- 
eral merchandising business, its trade covering a 
wide area of country tributary to Red Lodge, the 
enterprise being one of the most important in 
this section of the state. The company occupies 
a large building in the business center of the town, 
and is equipped with a full and select hne of gener- 
al merchandise, catering to a discriminating pat- 
ronage. The energy and executive ability of the 
president and manager have been the chief agencies 
through which the large and successful business 
has been built up, and no man in the county is held 
in higher regard in business and social circles. 

Mr. Flager has ever maintained a public-spirited 
interest in all that concerns the advancement and 
material prosperity of the city and county, and he 
was a member of the first aldermanic board of 
Red Lodge, and held the office of city clerk for two 
years. He was the framer of the greater portion 
of the city ordinances during the first two years 
after the incorporation of Red Lodge, and was 
among the influential and zealous promoters of the 
fine water system of the city. He gives unquali- 
fied allegiance to the Republican party, and at the 
present time is chairman of the county central 
committee. He was one of those chiefly instru- 
mental in the organization of the Red Lodge & 
Wyoming Telephone Company, of which he is 
still a stockholder also a director of the local 



building society, whose corporate title is the Red 
Lodge Building & Loan Association. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Masonic order, the Benev- 
olent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen 
of the World. On July 24, 1884, Mr. Flager was 
united in marriage to Miss Ruth Daniels, who was 
born in the city of St. Louis, the daughter of 
Benjamin and Elizabeth Daniels, natives of Bir- 
mingham, England. Mr. and Mrs. Flager have 
an interesting family of four children, namely: 
Howard, Harold, Ruth and Marie. 



PATRICK FLANAGAN, JR.— This young 
business man is a successful farmer and stock- 
grower of Fergus county, where he has resided for 
the past decade, taking advantage of the oppor- 
tunities afforded and winning success through in- 
dustry and good judginent in the direction of his 
efforts and affairs. 

Mr. Flanagan is a native of County Clare, Ire- 
land, where he was born on the 25th of March, 
1872, the son of Patrick and Katherine Flanagan, 
who emigrated from the Emerald Isle to Amer- 
ica in 1891, coming directly to Montana and lo- 
cating in the Antelope district of Fergus county, 
where Patrick Flanagan, Sr., the father, is still 
engaged in ranching, his place being located one 
and one-half miles southeast of Utica. He is a 
Democrat in politics and both himself and wife 
are devout members of the Roman Catholic 
church. They have ten children: Mary, Mar- 
garet, Patrick, Jr., John, William, Benjamin, Ann, 
Lena, James and Katie. 

Patrick Flanagan, Jr., attended the parochial 
schools of his native land for a brief period only. 
At the early age of five years he assisted his father 
on the little farm in Ireland, and had the duty 
of harnessing the farm horses when he was of 
so diminutive stature that he had to stand on a 
chair to do this. He labored with and for his 
parents until 1891, the year they all came to Mon- 
tana. Upon reaching Fergus county the young 
man secured employment as a ranch hand at 
$40 per month. He closely husbanded his re- 
sources, his ambition being to become independent 
and to secure a ranch of his own. He took up 
a claim of land and soon sold it for $250. In 1896 
he located on his present ranch, which comprises 
160 acres and is situated one mile east of his 
postoffice town of Utica. Mr. Flanagan has not 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1069 



been denied prosperity. He raises hay and oats, 
but devotes his attention more particularly to the 
growing of high-grade cattle. He is one of the 
popular young men of this section of the state. 
His right of franchise is utilized in support of 
the principles and policies of the Democratic 
party. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Catholic church, under whose discipline they were 
reared. 

On the 3d of January, 1894, Mr. Flanagan was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary C. Reiley, who 
was born in Pennsylvania, the daughter of Mat- 
thew J. and Bridget" Reiley, who were likewise 
born in Pennsylvania, of stanch Irish lineage. 
They, too, came to Montana in the pioneer days 
and located in Fergus county, where Mr. Reiley 
was engaged in the cattle business. Selling his 
interests in Montana in 1897, he is now a resi- 
dent of Capt Town, South Africa. Mr. and Mrs. 
Reiley were Catholics, in which faith she died on 
the I2th of September, 1895, leaving three daugh- 
ters, Nellie, Mary C. and Maggie. Mr. and Mrs. 
Flanagan are the parents of one daughter and two 
sons, Lillie L., Lear and Victor D. 



''PHOMAS FLANAGAN is one of the represent- 
1 ative farmers and stockgrowers of ^Montana, 
and has been a resident of the state for a quar- 
ter of a century. His life has been one of activity 
and usefulness, and at all times has he retained the 
confidence and good will of his fellowmen, his 
integrity of purpose being beyond question. A 
native of Missouri, Thomas Flanagan was born in 
Washington county, on August 19, 1855, being 
the son of Thomas and Sarah (Northcott) Flana- 
gan, the former of whom was born in County 
Galway, Ireland, and the latter in Kentucky. 
Thomas Flanagan, Sr., immigrated in the early 
'thirties to America, locating in Missouri. He 
there engaged in farming and stockraising until his 
death, in 1896, having attained the venerable age 
of eighty-six years, his wife passing away at the 
age of sixty-six years. They became the parents 
of eleven children, all living at the present time. 
Thomas Flanagan, Jr., the immediate subject of 
this review, passed his school days in his native 
county and early contributed his share of labor 
on the old homestead farm and grew to man- 
hood under its invigorating discipline. There he 



remained until 1877, when he started for Mon- 
tana, making the trip up the Missouri river on one 
of the light draft steamboats then in use on the 
upper waters and tributaries of the Big Muddy. 
He first located at White Sulphur Springs, his 
headquarters for a period of twelve years, and 
was engaged in various occupations, working for 
wages. He worked as a hand on a ranch on the 
American Fork, in Sweet Grass county, John 
Flanagan having charge, being in the employ of 
Dr. Wm. Parberry for a period of four years, and 
then came to his present location, on the south 
side of the Yellowstone river, in Sweet Grass coun- 
ty, the district then being a portion of the Crow 
Indian reservation, but was thrown open to set- 
tlement in the fall of 1892, when our subject se- 
cured title to his property. Here he engaged in 
the sheep business, and it is gratifying to note 
that his success has been excellent, coming as the 
natural result of discriminating and energetic ef- 
fort. His ranch comprises 320 acres, eligibly lo- 
cated, upon which he has made permanent im- 
provements of the best order. He has erected fine 
barns and corrals which afiford excellent shelter 
for stock and accommodations for the products 
of the ranch, while his residence is a neat two-story 
structure of modern design and conveniences. In. 
1878 Mr. Flanagan entered into partnership with 
his brother John, an association that exists. They 
conduct an extensive enterprise in the raising of 
sheep and cattle, running an average of 7,000 sheep 
of the Delaine type, and giving preference to the 
Hereford and shorthorn cattle, of which they us- 
ually keep about 300 head. The ranch owned 
by John Flanagan is located across the line in 
Carbon county, and yields excellent crops of hay 
each year. His home is in Carbon county, on 
the Big Rosebud creek. 

In politics the brothers give their allegiance to 
the Democratic party. Thomas was a member 
of the first board of county commissioners upon 
the formation of Sweet Grass county, both are 
men of sterling integrity and are held in the high- 
est esteem in the community. On November 25, 
1890, Mr. Thomas Flanagan was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary J. Bardott, who was born in 
Franklin county. Mo., the daughter of Joseph 
Bardott, who was born in France, whence he came 
to America and located in Missouri, where he 
passed the remainder of his life. Mr. and Mrs. 
Flanagan are the parents of four children : Will- 
iam Rav. Marv Teresa, Clara Mav and Mabel 



lO/O 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Verna. On October 27, 1899, Mr. John Flanagan 
married Miss Lizzie Bardott, a sister of his broth- 
er's wife, and they have one daughter, Mary 
Elizabeth. 



REV. THOMAS W. FLOWERS.— As a clergy- 
man of the Methodist Episcopal church South, 
Mr. Flowers labored zealously and indefatigably 
until the weight of years necessitated the aban- 
donment of the more active labors of the ministry, 
and he is now engaged in business in the attrac- 
tive little city of Victor, Ravalli county, where he 
is well known and highly honored. He was born 
in Meadville, Franklin county, Miss., on October 
24, 1828, the thirteenth of the fourteen children 
of Ephraim and Annie (Havis) Flowers, who were 
born respectively in Georgia and South Carolina, 
representatives of prominent old southern fam- 
ilies. His early education was secured in private 
schools, and these he attended as oportunity af- 
forded until he had attained his legal majority, 
and thereafter he was employed in the manage- 
ment of various plantations until 1861, being H- 
censed to preach in i860 by the M. E. church 
South, of which he was a devoted member, when 
he enlisted in the Confederate army as a private 
in the Seventh Mississippi Regiment. After a 
vear he was promoted to lieutenant and finally 
became chaplain of his regiment. Fie partici- 
pated in the battle of Haines Blufif and other 
engagements. 

When peace returned Mr. Flowers engaged in 
ministerial work, being first assigned to the Sun- 
flower circuit of Mississippi in the M. E. church 
South. He held various charges in Mississippi 
until 1 871, when he came to Montana, where has 
ever since been his home. Here he first had charge 
of the Diamond City circuit for two years ; there- 
after was in the city of Deer Lodge for three 
years, and in 1876 he took the Stevensville charge, 
which included the entire Bitter Root valley, in- 
cluding the city of Missoula, and after laboring 
with marked efficiency in this wide field for four 
years he was placed in a supernumerary relation- 
ship, but in 1891 he accepted an assignment to 
Grantsdale, retaining it until 1893, when he was 
])laced upon the supernumerary list. Since 1894 
Mr. Flowers has been engaged in the confection- 
ery and notion business in Victor, where he has 
secured an excellent patronage. His establish- 
ment is located in a building owned by himself, 



while he is also the owner of real estate in Stev- 
ensville. He will bequeath his property to the new 
training school, recently established by the church 
of his adoption at Stevensville. 

In politics Mr. Flowers has ever supported the 
Democratic party, in whose cause he has been 
an active worker. In 1898 he was the Demo- 
cratic nominee for representative of Ravalli county 
in the lower house of the legislature, but was not 
successful at the polls, owing to political exi- 
gencies which affected the entire party ticket. For 
many years he has been prominently identified 
with the Masonic order. On November 16, 1852, 
in Franklin county. Miss., Mr. Flowers was united 
in marriage to Mrs. Martha C. Crabtree, the 
daughter of Elections Williams, and the widow 
of Frederick P. Crabtree, by whom she had one 
son, Fred Crabtree, since deceased. Mrs. Flowers 
passed over to those activities that know no 
weariness on March 3, 1901. and was deeply 
mourned by a wide circle of devoted friends, her 
life having been ever animated by that faith which 
makes faithful. 



CRANK FOSTER.— The subject of this brief 
1 review is a native of Appanoose county, Iowa, 
where he was born on October 13, 1859, the son 
of Z. D. and Emily (Young) Foster, the former 
born in Indiana and the latter in Kentucky. They 
were the parents of six sons and four daughters. 
Z. D. Foster removed from Indiana to Iowa, 
where he married and remained until 1839, prof- 
itably engaged in farming and operating a saw- 
mill. In the spring of 1863 he started for Alon- 
tana, but did not arrive at Alder gulch until May 
I, 1864, having wintered at Bitter creek, Wyo. On 
his arrival in Montana he engaged in teaming for 
a year, and in 1885 removed to the Jefiferson val- 
ley, and taking up land there, went to ranching 
and also engaged in the sawmill business, his 
chief interests, however, being at this time in 
Oklahoma. 

Frank Foster, our immediate subject, grew up 
in Jefiferson county, attending the public schools 
there and remaining with the family until 1883 : 
then at the age of twenty-four, he took up and pur- 
chased property, where he is now located, and at 
once entered upon an extensive and profitable 
ranching and stockraising business, which he is 
still conducting wth gratifying results. He was 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



married on September 7, 1884, to Miss Sarah 
M. Dodge, of South Boulder, a native of Madison 
county, and daughter of B. F. Dodge. She died 
on March 31, 1898, leaving three children, namely: 
Olhe M., Carl F. and Althea M. Mr. Foster 
married again on March 14, 1901, his wife being 
formerly Miss Clara Gilbert, daughter of H. S. 
Gilbert, of Virginia City, Mont. Her parents 
came to Virginia City in 1863, where Mrs. Gil- 
bert was born, educated and attained womanhood. 
They have a pleasant home on their well im- 
proved and highly cultivated ranch, and make it 
one of pleasing hospitality to their numerous 
friends. In political relations Mr. Foster is a Re- 
publican, but is not an active party worker or an 
office-seeker. He has, however, served his people 
in the office of road supervisor, a position which 
his excellent judgment is very useful and highly 
appreciated. In fraternal relations he is allied 
with the Masons, its adjunct, the Eastern Star, 
qiid the United Workmen. 



JOHN J. FRANK.— The career of this gentle- 
man has been varied and eventful, and even a 
cursory review of the same will be interesting. He 
served in the German army during the war be- 
tween Austria and Prussia, and on coming to 
America his excellent tactical knowledge led him 
to a position of prominence in the regular army of 
the United States, in which he served with honor 
and distinction. Mr. Frank is today numbered 
among the representative citizens of Carbon 
county, where he has a fine ranch property and 
serves the county as a member of the board of 
commissioners. A native of Baden, Germany, 
John J. Frank was born on October 6, 1846, be- 
ing one of the children of John J. and Emma Mary 
(Schneider) Frank, natives of Baden. The father , 
of our subject immigrated to America in 1849, 
at the time of the revolution in his native 
land, and located in New York city, finally re- 
moving to Philadelphia, where he passed the re- 
mainder of his life devoting his attention prin- 
cipally to mercantile pursuits. His widow survived 
him many years, her death occurring in Baden, 
Germany, in the year 1875. John J. Frank, Jr., 
the immediate subject of this sketch, remained in 
Germany with his mother and sister, and there se- 
cured his educational training in the excellent 
schools of the empire, after which he learned the 



trade of cabinet making. His military service had 
its inception when he was twenty-one years of 
age, and as a member of the First Grenadiers, 
under Col. Dagenfelt, he served during the Prus- 
sian-Austrian war of 1866, and was an active par- 
ticipant in the memorable battle of Schoffensburg, 
and a number of other important engagements. 
After the war he started for America, landing at 
Castle Garden, N. Y., March 7, 1867, a stranger 
in a strange land and with a very slight knowledge 
of the English language. He worked at his trade 
in New York for a period of six months, and was 
similarly engaged in the city of Philadelphia for 
two years. Mr. Frank then enlisted in the United 
States army, being sent to Camp Supulpa, I. T., 
and assigned to the Thirteenth United States In- 
fantry, under Col. Delanze Flogt Jones, his com- 
pany being under command of Capt. R. P. Use, 
now serving in the Philippines. Mr. Frank re- 
mained in the army for a period of five years, with- 
in which time he participated in numerous skir- 
mishes with the Indians. He was located at Fort 
Dodge, Fort Hayes and Fort Wallace, Kan., and at 
New Orleans, whence he went up the Red river, and 
received his honorable discharge at Coushetta, La. 
After his discharge Mr. Frank went to Parsons, 
Kan., and turned his attention to his trade, being 
employed for eighteen months, removing thence 
to Armstrong, where he was employed in the shops 
of the Kansas Pacific Railroad. He then joined 
the stampede to Colorado, locating at Brecken- 
ridge. Summit county, occasionally working at his 
trade and engaged in mining operations for two 
years, meeting with fair success. He then moved 
to Frisco, where he remained until 1886, and en- 
gaged in mining and carpentering. He then started 
for Montana, arriving in Helena on the Fourth 
of July in the year mentioned, and soon afterward 
he began mining at German bar, on Ten Mile 
creek, passing the remainder of the summer in 
prospecting, but meeting with little success. He 
then went to Marysville, where he continued min- 
ing and trading for eighteen months, passing the 
following two years at Castle, where his mining 
prospects were excellent until the shutting down 
of the smelter. In 1892 he came to Carbon county 
and located his present ranch, which now com- 
prices 160 acres located at Fishtail, his postoffice 
address. He has recently turned his attention to 
the raising of cattle, and such is his discrimination 
and business ability that it is practically certain 
that he will become one of the leading representa- 



1072 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



tives of this great industry in this section of the 
state. That Mr. Frank commands the unequivocal 
confidence and esteem of the community is evident 
from the position which he holds as a member of 
the board of county commissioners, to which office 
he was elected in 1901. While residing at Frisco, 
Colo., he served as city marshal, and also held the 
office of road supervisor for four years. 

His political faith is that maintained by the Re- 
publican party. It may be noted that when Mr. 
Frank entered the United States army his knowl- 
edge of English was yet very limited, but within 
a year he was made corporal, while nine months 
later he was advanced to first sergeant, this pro- 
motion being a recognition of his ability and 
fidelity. On May 14, 1901, Mr. Frank was united 
in marriage to Mrs. Ella Jones, who was born in 
Warren county, 111., a daughter of William and 
Deborah Howard, who both lived to the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-four years and were na- 
tives of England. 



JOHN LARSON.— Holding preferment as one 
of the county commissioners of Lewis and 
Clarke county, and honored as one of the sterling 
pioneers of Montana, Mr. Larson represents that 
sturdy element which gained to Montana her early 
prestige : conserving her industries and resources 
through individual interposition and effort and 
witnessing her development and her progress to 
a position of importance among the great sister- 
hood of states. Mr. Larson is a native of Den- 
mark, where he was born on June 14, 1839, be- 
ing the son of Hans Larson, who passed his entire 
life in Denmark, as did also his wife, whose maiden 
name was Catherine Christison. John Larson 
grew to maturity in his native land, receiving his 
education in the public schools, and serving in 
the national army from 1861 to 1863, being a 
member of the king's bodyguard. In October, 
1863, at the age of twenty-four years, he sev- 
ered home ties and came to America, landing 
at Quebec, Canada, on the first of November, 
proceeding at once to Chicago and thence to 
Racine, Wis., where he found some of his coun- 
trymen engaged in the coopering business. He 
was there employed until April, 1864, when he 
associated himself with four other Danes in the 
purchasing of an ox team and supplies and start- 
ing on the long overland trip to Idaho, They 



crossed the state of Iowa to Omaha, thence across 
the North Platte river and by way of the Boze- 
man cutoff. There were sixty-three wagons in the 
train on crossing the Big Horn and Yellowstone 
rivers. The train ahead was attacked by Indians 
and many of the party were killed, and the com- 
pany of which Mr. Larson was a member gave 
burial to three of the unfortunates whose bodies 
had been left where they fell, their companions 
having fled before the ruthless savages, unable to 
perform the last sad rites. Mr. Larson stopped 
a week where the city of Livingston is now located 
and thence started on a prospecting trip up the 
Yellowstone to Emigrant gulch. Thence he con- 
tinued his way to Virginia City, where he arrived 
August 9, 1864, and there found employment in 
the placer mines at $8.00 per day, payment being 
made in gold dust. On the 3d of November he 
and his companions started with their team for 
Silver Bow, erected a cabin near what is now 
Butte and took up a mining claim, and during 
the winter Mr. Larson secured contracts for the 
building of a number of houses in Silver Bow. 
In March, 1865, he went to Ophir gulch, to which 
locality there was at that time a typical stam- 
pede; but as the results did not justify the rush 
to the new diggings he reurned to Silver Bow, 
but soon afterward joined a stampede to Ger- 
man gulch, where better success attended his ef- 
forts. He here opened a good mine, which he 
operated until the spring of 1869, when he made 
his way to Carpenter bar, near Blackfoot City. 
Meeting with poor success he continued on to 
Little Blackfoot, purchased mining grounds and 
built a ditch, but gold not panning out in paying- 
quantities he took up a ranch, to which he ap- 
plied the name of Sweetland station, located on the 
stage road between Helena and Deer Lodge. He 
continued to reside on this ranch nearly ten years, 
until April, 1879, and then went to the Penob- 
scot mine, near Marysville, Lewis and Clarke 
county, where he engaged in teaming. This has 
since been Mr. Larson's home and base of oper- 
ations. In 1881 the mine was closed down, and 
since that time he has been engaged in team- 
ing for the Bald Butte and Drum Lummon mines 
with good success. On Christmas eve, 1886, Mr. 
Larson was united in marriage to Miss Kate Con- 
stance, who was born in Hastings, Minn., her par- 
ents being natives of Alsace, France, whence they 
emigrated, coming to the United States when 
young, the father engaging in the baking busi- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1073 



ness. Mrs. Larson had come to Helena to visit 
an uncle, and here her marriage was solemnized. 
The children of this union are three in number: 
John H., born in November, 1887; Annie, in Feb- 
ruary, 1889; and George, in February, 1891, all 
students in the public schools at the present time. 
The family attend the services of the Protestant 
Episcopal church. 

Politically Mr. Larson is recognized as a stal- 
wart Republican, and on the ticket of his party 
in 1896 was elected a member of the board of 
county commissioners of Lewis and Clarke county 
for a term of four years, serving with signal abil- 
ity and discrimination, his term expiring in No- 
vember, 1901. Fraternally Mr. Larson is identified 
with Silver Creek Lodge No. 19, A. O. U. W., of 
Marysville, having passed all the chairs in the 
same ; with Marysville Lodge No. 24, L O. O. F. ; 
and with Evergreen Lodge No. 16, K. of P. ; 
while in the time-honored order of Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons his affiliations are with Ot- 
tawa Lodge No. 51. He is also a prominent 
member of the Montana Pioneer Society, in whose 
organization he was instrumental. He is still in- 
terested in quartz mining operations, being presi- 
dent of the Marion Mining Company, at Marys- 
ville, a very productive property. Mr. Larson has 
ever been known as a man of inflexible integrity, 
being upright in all his relations with his fellow- 
men and holding uniform confidence and respect 
in the county and state which have been the scene 
of his long and earnest endeavors. 



^yESLEY P. FRANKLIN, of Sweet Grass 
V\ county, is a native of Owen county, Ind., 
where he was born March 15, 1837. His parents 
were John and Mary (Puett) Franklin, both of 
whom were born in North Carolina. The father 
was one of the early settlers of Indiana. In 1850 
he removed to McLean county. 111., where he re- 
sided until his death in 1857. Wesley received a 
common school education and assisted his father 
on the farm. When his father died he began farm- 
ing and raising stock on his own account. In 1886 
he came to Montana by way of the Northern Pa- 
cific Railroad, and located near Big Timber, where 
he first took up a squatter's claim on Fish creek, 
about thirty miles from the town. There he en- 
gaged in the sheep business in company with his 
son, Herschel P., who had come to the state be- 



fore him and had managed the business since 1881. 
They remained on Fish creek until the fall of 
1886, then moved to their present ranch, which was 
known at that time as the Puett ranch. In 1889 
they purchased the ranch, which comprised 480 
acres. To this they have added by purchase, home- 
stead, pre-emption and desert claims until they have 
9,330 acres, of which about one-third is under ef- 
fective irrigation, and all is well fenced. In 1898 
they sold all their sheep and since then have dealt 
only in cattle, wintering on an average of 500 
head, the Galloway being their favorite breed. 
They also do an extensive business in buying and 
shipping cattle. 

On March 23, 1858, Mr. Franklin was united in 
marriage with Miss Hannah Puett, a native of In- 
diana. They are the parents of four children, Es- 
tella, Herschel P., Lillian and Daisy. In politics 
Mr. Franklin is a Democrat, but not an active par- 
tisan, and has never sought or held an office of 
any kind. He is a member of the Christian church, 
and is held in high esteem as a man wherever he 
is known. 



TOHN H. FREESER.— Bom of parents who 
J emigrated from Germany to the United States 
a few days after their marriage, locating in St. 
Charles county, Mo., where their four daughters 
and one son were born, John H. Freeser, their 
youngest child, was born on January 9, 1843. Five 
years later his father, a prosperous farmer and 
stonemason, died, but under his mother's care he 
was educated in the common schools. Remaining 
at home until he was fourteen, he went to St. 
Louis, where he was a clerk and a salesman in 
a hardware store for seven years. In 1864 he made 
the trip overland to Montana with William H. 
Logeman, of St. Louis. They had one team of six 
mules and one of four, and the wagons were loaded 
with merchandise. They joined a train of thirty- 
four wagons belonging to Effort, Bush & Hanover, 
encountered no hostile Indians, and reached Vir- 
ginia City on July 14, 1864, being nearly four 
months on the way. Mr. Freeser engaged in mer- 
chandising at Central City for a year, but gave too 
much credit, and, in the spring of 1865, he went to 
German gulch and spent the next six months in 
mining. He had an interest in three claims, and 
after running a drain ditch up to the claims he 
began stripping ground. But as the work paid him 
onlv $2.i^o a day for each man and he paid $6.00 



I074 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



to each as wages, he threw it up and went to Salt 
Lake, where, in the spring of 1866, he bought sev- 
eral bull teams and began freighting to Montana. 
Finding the business proiitable and not unpleas- 
ant, he continued in it until 1870, when he located 
on the Missouri, thirty miles from Helena, and en- 
gaged in stock raising. In 1874 he removed to 
the Musselshell and took up his present property, 
one mile east of Two Dot, where he has 4,000 
acres of land. On this and the range at the mouth 
of the Musselshell he keeps about 2,000 head of 
cattle, mostly shorthorns. Mr. Freeser was mar- 
ried in February, 1878, to Miss Lizzie F. Fink, a 
native of Chicago, and a daughter of Frederick 
Fink, who has made Chicago his home for many 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Freeser have six children, Wil- 
liam H., James A. G., Minnie, Marie, Laura and 
Adelia, and to give his children the best educational 
advantages they have a residence in Helena. In 
public affairs Mr. Freeser has taken an active inter- 
est. He has been school trustee and school clerk 
and was the choice of his party for sheriff, but de- 
clined the nomination. In fraternal relations he be- 
longs to the Masonic order and to the Ancient Or- 
der of United Workmen. He is a gentleman of ex- 
cellent standing and an enterprising and progres- 
sive business man. He is broad minded and far see- 
ing in public matters and in many and diversified 
directions his ability and his power of deftly weaving 
discordant elements into harmonious relations has 
caused his judgments and opinions in public, pri- 
vate and social relations to be accepted. He is oni 
of the best types of the social and hospitable Mon- 
tanian and his generosity is as broad as her wide 
plains. 



MATTHEW FURNELL.— One of the worthy 
pioneers of Montana, and here attaining 
marked success through his own efforts, and gain- 
ing the respect and esteem of all by his life of 
rectitude and well directed effort, Matthew Fur- 
nell was born near Toronto, Canada, on June 20, 
1842, and was left an orphan when a mere child. 
His sister, the only other child of his parents, is 
now a resident of northern Michigan. Mr. Furnell 
had nothing but his sturdy courage and self-reli- 
ance to rely upon in life after he was twelve years 
old and he has used them well, overcoming seem- 
ingly insurmountable obstacles and making for 
himself an honored place. 

As a young man Mr. Furnell found employment 



for some time in New York city, after which he 
was located in Michigan until 1882, when he 
came to Montana and engaged in mining at Vir- 
ginia City and later near Helena. He finally 
located in Cascade county, in the Sun river val- 
ley, securing a tract of valuable land and engag- 
ing in the raising of cattle, to which he thereafter 
devoted his entire attention until death released 
him from his labors on May 7, 1896. Mr. Fur- 
nell had marked ability in the conduct of his busi- 
ness affairs, and success came as a symmetrical re- 
sult. His was an unassuming life, but one con- 
secrated to goodly ends, so that he held the con- 
fidence and esteem of all. Mr. Furnell was twice 
married, his last union having been solemnized 
in 1882, when he was united to Miss Delia Peak, 
who was born near Florence, Mich., and who sur- 
vives her honored husband, as do also their three 
children, George Ray, Albert M. and Florence 
M. Mrs. Furnell now maintains her home in the 
city of Great Falls, in the schools of which city 
her children are receiving their educational dis- 
cipline. 



T EE FREUDENSTEIN.— Called upon at the 
JL/ early age of fifty-seven, just when he was 
ready to enjoy the rest and comfort his busy and 
adventurous life had earned, to surrender his 
trust at the behest of the Great Disposer, Lee 
Freudenstein, the subject of this review, cannot 
be said to have completed his life work ; but 
what he accomplished was greater in volume 
and better in quality than the results of many lives 
of more protracted length and wider opportunity. 
He was born at Munster, Westphalia, Germany, 
October 27, 1842, and was educated at the ele- 
mentary and high schools of that locality. At the 
age of eighteen he made a vist to America, spend- 
ing a year in Canada, but returned to Germany and 
enlisted in the army. After one year's service he 
was made secretary to the general, and in that 
capacity served two years longer. At the end of his 
military term he spent two years in the hard- 
ware business in partnership with his brother. In 
1866 he again came to America, locating at Clin- 
ton, 111., and engaged in the clothing business with 
his brother for a time. From there he went to 
Yankton, S. D., and kept a restaurant for eight 
years. Returning to Chicago he opened a large 
grocery business which he conducted successfully 
until he determined in 1882 to come to Montana. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1075 



On his arrival in the state he began operations in 
mining, having fallen heir to a valuable property, 
the Germania mine, left him by an uncle who 
died just previous to his coming to Butte, which 
he operated irom 1886 to 1892, when it was closed 
on account of the fall in silver. At that time he 
began working other properties which he owned, 
and some of which he had leased in addition. In 
1893 he took a trip to Europe for the benefit of 
his health, returning to Butte in 1895 and remain- 
ing there until his death, which occurred in 1899. 
Since that sad event his widow has looked after 
the properties and conducted their interests with 
skill and vigor. 

Mr. Freudenstein was married February 13, 
1879, to Miss Christina Reckermann, a native of 
Germany. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, all but one of whom are still living. They are 
Louis A., Robert P., Rosa M., Joseph, Charles, 
Henry and Clarence ; the one deceased was a son 
named George. In fraternal relations ^Ir. Freuden- 
stein was identified with the Kriegerverein and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. In politics he 
aifiliated with the Republican party, but was not 
an active partisan. Mrs. Freudenstein, without 
ain special preparation or previous knowledge 
of the business, had thrust upon her the care of 
extensive and valuable mining interests and other 
business affairs, in addition to the duties of her 
household and the rearing of her large family. 
She has met the requirements of her trying situ- 
ation in a masterly manner, and has not suffered 
anything to lose value under her management. 
She is an esteemed member of the United Moderns, 
and in the community where she lives enjoys the 
confidence and regard of all who have the pleas- 
ure of knowing her. 



T OSEPH GALLAGHER.— A native of Modoc 
J county, Cal., where he was born May 12, 1875, 
and having passed his entire life so far in the 
far west, Mr. Gallagher is thoroughly identified 
with this section of our country. His parents 
were Edward M. and Margaret R. Gallagher, the 
former born on the ocean voyage to America, 
and the latter in Pennsylvania. In 1866 they went 
to California, where the father was a carpenter 
and wheelwright. He was also a soldier in the 
Civil war, and in the war against the Modoc In- 
dians. In 1883 Mr. and Mrs. Gallagher removed 



to New Pine creek, Lake county, Ore., but soon 
returned to California, where the father died De- 
cember 4, 1895. He was an ardent Republican 
and a devout member of the Catholic church, while 
the mother was a Baptist in religious faith. Of 
their thirteen children twelve are now alive. 

Joseph Gallagher was the fifth of the children 
of his father's family, received a very limited edu- 
cation, as he was obliged to assist his parents 
from the age of eight.years, and when he was thir- 
teen hired out at a compensation of $1.00 per 
day. For four years he worked for this high allow- 
ance for boys and then received an increase to 
$2.00 per day. Soon after this he engaged in sheep 
shearing for six seasons, in the meantime do- 
ing something in ranch work. In 1898 he came 
to Montana, and a year later took up a home- 
stead claim three miles northeast of Philbrook. 
Here he is ranching and sheepraising. He also 
raises fine crops of hay and oats. In political 
relations he is a Republican and fraternally is 
allied w;ith the Knights of Pythias. On November 
21, 1898, Mr. Gallagher married Miss Pearl E. 
Dickson, a native of Solano county, Cal., and 
daughter of William S. and Alice Dickson, natives 
of Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Gallagher are the 
parents of two children, one of whom died in 
infancy, and the other, William J., is living at 
home. Mr. and Mrs. Gallagher are members of 
the Episcopal church. 



F' RANK GALLAGHER was one of those who 
came to Montana in the early pioneer days, 
when this section was on the very frontier of 
civilization, and thus he left his native land, where 
the annals of history extend over many centuries, 
to not only make for himself a home and an 
honorable reputation in the new world, but also 
to identify himself with one of the most undevel- 
oped sections of it. He lived to witness the won- 
derful transformation of ^Montana, and took dis- 
tinctive pride in watching the various transition 
stages which eventuated in the admission of Mon- 
tana to statehood, with the facilities and improve- 
ments of a high civilization. Mr. Gallagher was 
one of the alert and progressive farmers and stock- 
growers of Powell county at the time of his death, 
and his life had been one of such honor and integ- 
rity that his loss was deeply felt in the community. 
Frank Gallagher was a native of the Emerald 



1076 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Isle, and was born in March, 1840. He received a 
common school education in his native land, and 
there learned the trade of shoemaker. In 1857 
he emigrated to America, where he arrived in 
March, and located in Scranton, Pa., where he 
worked at his trade until 1861, when he journeyed 
to the far west, engaging in mining m Colorado 
until 1866, when he joined the stampede of miners 
to Alder gulch, Mont., where the richest of placer 
mines had been discovered. 'He remained at Vir- 
ginia City for a few months, in the fall removing 
to Blackfoot City, where he was engaged in min- 
ing until 1870, when he took up a ranch in the 
Nevada vaUey, Powell county, and there estab- 
lished a perjnanent home. The ranch is located 
three miles west of the Washington gulch post- 
office and comprises 320 acres of very fertile and 
productive land, much of which is under high 
cultivation, with the permanent improvements of 
the best order, making the place a most valuable 
and attractive one. 

Mr. Gallagher here devoted his attention to 
agriculture and stockraising until his death, which 
occurred on January 7, 1900, and his widow has 
since conducted the business with signal discre- 
tion and ability, having shown herself capable of 
meeting all the exigencies incidental to the work 
of the ranch, and taking a deep interest in carrying 
on the enterprise inaugurated by her husband and 
by him brought to that success which insured 
to his family the retention of a good home and 
an insured income. In politics Mr. Gallagher 
belonged to the Democratic party, and at the 
time of his death he was incumbent of the ofifice 
of school trustee, ever having taken a deep in- 
terest in educational affairs and also in all other 
agencies which tend to the advancement and pros- 
perity of his community. On January 3, 1886, in 
Deer Lodge county, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Gallagher to Miss Ellen Lynch, who was 
born in County Cork, Ireland, and six children 
were born to them, Margaret, Mary, John, Jo- 
hanna, Ellen and Francis, all of whom are with 
their mother on the old homestead. 



VI J ILLIAM J. GALAHAN is one of the ster- 
VV ling pioneers of Montana and a represent- 
ative business man of Madison county. He is a 
native of New York city, where he was born 
December 20, 1843. His father, Thomas Galahan, 



was born in Ireland, and was a surveyor by pro- 
fession, and immigrated to America about the 
year 1836 and located in the city of Philadelphia, 
where he studied civil engineering and became 
an expert surveyor. In 1857 he moved to Kan- 
sas and there died in 1867. He was united to 
Miss Ellen Stokesbury, who Hkewise was born in 
Ireland, whence she accompanied her parents on 
their removal to the United States, the family tak- 
ing up their residence in New York city, where 
their marriage was consummated. Of this union 
seven children were born, the subject of this 
sketch being the second. The mother of Mr. Gala'- 
han passed away in 1894. WilHam J. Gallahan 
received his educational training in the public 
schools of New York city and Kansas, and in 
1862, upon personally assuming the responsibili- 
ties of life he engaged for three years in freight- 
ing from the Missouri river to Denver, Colo. 
In 1865 he moved from Denver to Nevada City, 
located below Virginia City, in Alder gulch, then 
one of the most busy placer mming camps known 
in the history of gold seeking. In 1866 he en- 
gaged in mercantile business at Nevada City for 
one and a half years, when the mines at Rochester 
were opened up and caused an influx of pros- 
pectors and miners, and thereupon removed to 
that point and engaged in the sale of dry goods, 
clothing and furnishing goods for two years. Mr. 
Galahan then turned his attention to ranching, 
locating on a farm on Wisconsin creek, five miles 
south of Twin Bridges, his postoffice adddress. 
The ranch now comprises 160 acres, finely im- 
proved and devoted to diversified farming and 
stockgrowing. In addition to his ranching in- 
terests Mr. Galahan conducts a large feed, grain, 
flour and hamess store in the village of Twin 
Bridges, which receives his personal attention, 
while one of his sons has practical charge of the 
home ranch. 

In politics our subject is a stalwart Republican, 
and has ever taken- a deep interest in all that 
makes for the progress and material prosperity 
of the county and state. He served three terms 
as road supervisor and is thoroughly public-spir- 
ited in his attitude. He is a popular and active 
member of the Masonic fraternity, affiliating with 
Westgate Lodge No. 27, A. F. & A. M., at Twin 
Bridges, in which he has filled all the official 
chairs. At Salt Lake City, Utah, in October, 
1865, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gala- 
han to Miss Isabella Tarbet, who was born at sea, 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



10// 



off the coast of Newfoundland, while her par- 
ents were en route from Scotland to America, 
where her father engaged in the meat market 
business. Her parents both died during her child- 
hood and she was reared in the home of her 
brother. They removed to Omaha, Neb., and at 
Council Bluffs she formed the acquaintance of 
Mr. Galahan, the ultimate result being their mar- 
riage. They are the parents of seven children 
as follows : Thomas married Miss Mary Maloney 
and they have three children, he being one of the 
successful young ranchmen of the Ruby valley, 
Madison county; George is a contractor and is 
now residing in the state of Idaho ; John C. is en- 
gaged in freighting; Amos A. has charge of the 
homestead ranch; Rosella is the wife of Clark 
Kemph, of Rochester, this county, and Walter 
and Harrison are in school. 



T OHN D. GAINEY.— Identified with the rail- 
J way mail service of the government, and main- 
taining his headquarters in the city of Havre, 
Mr. Gainey is one of the popular and progressive 
young men of the state. He comes of fine old 
southern lineage and is a native of the beautiful 
old Crescent city. New Orleans, La., where he 
was born on August 29, 1873, the son of William 
H. and Anna (Hicks) Gainey. The father was 
born in Tallahassee, Fla., and for the past quarter 
of a century has been cotton inspector at New 
Orleans, his duties being to properly grade and 
classify cotton previous to its shipment. In 1869 
was solemnized his marriage to Miss Anna Hicks, 
who was born in Columbus, Ga. 

John D. Gainey received his education in the 
public schools and the Atlanta (Ga.) University. 
When eighteen years of age he became a travel- 
ing representative for the International Publish- 
ing Company, of Philadelphia, with which he was 
thus identified for thirty months, and for the next 
six months he was in the life insurance business 
in his native city, where he became identified with 
Vera Cruz Lodge No. 24, of the Masonic frater- 
nity, with which he is now affiliated, and where he 
enlisted in the Twenty-fifth United States Infan- 
try, with which he came to Fort Missoula, Mont., 
and where he was stationed three years, during 
which time he was a member of the band and 
edited the regimental newspaper, The Bugler, mak- 
ing a spicy exponent of the technical and social 



life of the fort. At the opening of the Spanish- 
American war Mr. Gainey was connected with the 
quartermaster's department at Chattanooga, Tenn., 
where he issued clothing to all of the volunteer 
soldiers. He left the army in June, 1898, and 
returned to New Orleans, passed a civil service 
examination in 1900, and in 1901 came again 
to Montana, where he has since been employed 
in the railway mail service, and at present is on 
duty on the St. Paul & Havre R. P. O. of the 
Great Northern Railroad. 



EDWARD M. GARDNER is a prominent 
and influential citizen of Bozeman, Gallatin 
county, engaged in the real estate and insur- 
ance business, formerly identified with the stock- 
growing industry. He has been a resident of 
Montana for more than two decades, held official 
position of trust and responsibiHty, and is known 
as an enthusiastic advocate of the cause of the Pro- 
hibitionists, his zealous efforts having done much 
to further the cause, and thus place him high in 
the councils of the party. Mr. Gardner was born 
in Northville, Wayne county, Mich., February 10, 
1842. His father, Abram A. Gardner, was born in 
Vermont in 181 1, moved to Michigan when a 
young man, later to Kansas and thence to Oregon, 
Mo., where he died in 1877. He was an able 
practicing physician and surgeon, and attained 
eminence in his profession. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Jennette C. Russell, was born 
in 1812 at Charlestown, Mass., now a part of Bos- 
ton, and her death occurred at Oregon, Mo., in 
1880. The paternal grandparents were natives of 
Vermont, while the maternal grandparents were 
born in Scotland. 

Edward M. Gardner received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native village and 
of Detroit, Mich., and left school at the age of 
seventeen years. In i860 he accompanied his par- 
ents on their removal to Kansas, where they pur- 
chased a farm near the town of Highland, where 
our subject found, employment for two years, in 
cultivating the place. He taught school in High- 
land for one year, and turned his attention to 
freighting from St. Joseph, Mo., to Denver, Colo., 
and thus engaged from 1863 to 1866. He then 
purchased a farm of 500 acres in Nodaway county, 
Mo., remained there for a period of twelve years, 
extensively engaged in the raising of cattle and 



1078 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



devoting especial attention to the breeding of 
high-grade shorthorn stock. Disposing of his 
farm and business in 1879, he started for Mon- 
tana, and arrived in Bozeman on June 2, where 
he bought a herd of cattle, together with their 
brand. He was associated in Gallatin county with 
his step-son, Charles F. Baker, for seventeen years 
in the raising of cattle, Mr. Baker having active 
charge of the business. In 1879 Mr. Gardner lo- 
cated in Bozeman, and in 1S81 was appointed dep- 
uty clerk of the United States district court for 
the First judicial district, in which capacity he 
served for five years. Since 1886 he has been 
prominently engaged in the real estate and in- 
surance business and concerned in many extensive 
and important realty transactions. He controls 
a large insurance business, second to no other 
agency in this section of the state. 

Mr. Gardner has been a Prohibitionist since 
1884, and been prominent as chairman or secre- 
tary of the state central committee of the same. 
In 1892 he was the party's candidate for secre- 
tary of state, receiving the largest vote of any 
candidate on the ticket. The same year he was 
delegate to the national convention of the party, 
held in Cincinnati, which nominated John Bid- 
well for president; and in 1900 he was delegate to 
the national convention in Chicago which placed 
John G. Wooley in nomination for the presidency. 
In 1894 Mr. Gardner was elected to the city coun- 
cil of Bozeman, re-elected in 1896, and was presi- 
dent of that body until the expiration of his 
term in 1898. Fraternally he is a member of 
Western Star Lodge No. 4, I. O. O. F., and 
passed all the chairs ; is past master of Bozeman 
Lodge No. 5, A. O. U. W., and a member of the 
grand lodge of this order in the state, having 
passed the various chairs and served as grand 
master in 1896; in 1898 he was supreme repre- 
sentative to the grand lodge of the United States, 
convened that year at Asbury Park, N. J. 

At Highland, Kan., on May 4, 1870, Mr. Gard- 
ner was united in marriage to Mrs. Flora Baker, 
widow of John Baker and daughter of Findley and 
Rachel (Irvin) McCreary, and of this union have 
been born one son and three daughter : Arch R. ; 
Mary W., wife of P. C. Waite, of Bozeman ; Mat- 
tie J. and Carrie P. Mr. Gardner, his wife and 
daughters are members of the Presbyterian church 
at Bozeman. He was elected elder and ordained 
in 1883, has done much for the upbuilding of the 
church in the city, and was commissioner to the 



general assembly in Pittsburg in 1896. He and 
his family occupy a prominent place in social 
circles of Bozeman. 



ALBERT J. GATES, one of the progressive 
business men of Cascade county, who is largely 
and successfully engaged in the raising of stock, 
came to Montana in 1888. He was born in Elling- 
ton, Chautauqua county, N. Y., on June 10, 1836, 
the son of Ardil and Orilla (Hall) Gates, natives 
of Vermont. His father was a cabinetmaker until 
he enlisted in the war of 1812. He was taken 
prisoner near Plattsburg, N. Y., and was for three 
days without food. He died in Meeker county, 
Minn., in 1883, at the age of eighty-nine years, and 
his wife died at Le Boeuf, Erie county. Pa., at the 
age of sixty-three. 

In 1844 Mr. Gates left Ellington and went to 
Dodge county, Wis., where he assisted his father 
in his farm work and attended the common schools. 
Here he remained until he was nineteen years of 
age, when he returned to Ellington, and was em- 
ployed on the farm of his brother, Joel Gates 
(father of Mrs. W. H. Betts), for nearly a year. 
In 1857 he went to Erie county. Pa., with his 
father's family, where they engaged in farming and 
fruitraising for seven years. During that time, 
in 1859, Mr. Gates went to Blue Earth county, 
Minn., and was associated with his brothers, Seth 
and David, in freighting, then the only method 
of transporting goods, as there were no railroads. 
On February 25, 1861, he went to Wisconsin, 
only staying until April 13, then returned to his 
Pennsylvania home and engaged in carpenter 
work. In 1864 Mr. Gates again went to Blue 
Earth county, Minn., where he was engaged in 
farming until 1880, and then removed to Stearns 
county, where he remained eight years. 

In 1888 Mr. Gates came to Great Falls, Mont., 
and was taken sick on April 10 and confined to 
his bed for many months, being removed on a 
bed to his home on his present ranch. The lo- 
cation of this ranch is twelve miles south of Sand 
Coulee. Here he took up combined homestead 
and tree claims of 320 acres, and has, in a mea- 
sure, recovered his health. He cultivates forty 
acres. 

In 1864 Mr. Gates was united in marriage to 
Miss Adaline Fairchild, daughter of George W. 
and Ruth (Beebe) Fairchild, of Union City, Pa. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Of their ten children, one, Edward, is de- 
ceased. The Hving are Rowena Electa, Alberta 
Rosella, Marston Wellington, William Ardil, Dora 
Ada, Laura Mabel, Claudia Lewis, George Albert 
and Byron Ira. Mr. Gates has given his son his 
tree claim consisting of i6o acres of land, the 
transfer having been made in September, 1896; 
but he still has 160 acres, sixteen head of cattle 
and six horses. Since his first arrival in Mon- 
tana his health has been poor, and he has more 
and more desired to retire from active business. 



FRANK GEHRIXG.— There is ever marked 
satisfaction afiforded in reviewing the career 
of one who has attained success as a result of his 
efforts, and Mr. Gehring,one of the successful ranch 
men of Cascade county, where he is conducting 
operations on an extended scale as a cattle grower 
and farmer, is such a man. Mr. Gehring was born 
at Wabash, Adams county, Ind., on October 2, 
1846, the son of John and Saloma Gehring, both 
of whom were born in Wittemberg, Germany, 
where the former followed tilemaking. Coming to 
the United Sfates in 1845, he engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits. They were devoted members of the 
Lutheran church, in whose faith the father passed 
away in 1849, his widow surviving him until 1872. 

In the public schools of Indiana Frank Gehring 
received his education, but he early assumed per- 
sonal responsibilities, as he was only three years 
old when his father div.d. At fifteen he took active 
interest in the stockraising and farming of his 
mother's homestead, being thus employed until 
1870, when he came to Helena, Mont., and he may 
be considered as a pioneer of the state, of which he 
has been a resident for over thirty years. He was 
employed at ranch work, and in 1873 he went to 
North Dakota, and worked there at ranching until 
the fall of 1874, when he returned to his old home 
in Indiana. In 1875 he returned to Montana and 
located at Silver City, where he took up a mining 
claim of twenty acres. This proving a failure, he 
abandoned it and engaged in teaming and stock- 
raising in which his success was excellent. In the 
spring of 1881 Mr. Gehring came to Sand Coulee 
valley, Cascade county, and entered a pre-emption 
claim of 160 acres and a homestead claim of equal 
area. 

In 1890 he purchased 160 acres of his sister-in- 
law, Miss Ellen O'Conrtor, paying $600 for the 



property, which adjoins his original claims. Here 
he has since been engaged in farming, dairying 
and stockraising extensively and with a due quota 
of success. His ranch is located eight miles south- 
east of Great Falls. Mr. Gehring in 1886 moved 
to Great Falls and built his present residence. No. 
422 Fifth avenue, south, which has since been his 
home. In politics Mr. Gehring renders allegiance 
to the Populist party, while fraternally he is 
identified with the United Workmen of America. 
In 1875 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Gehring and Miss Julia M. O'Connor, who was 
born in Indiana, and the daughter of Michael and 
Ellen O'Connor, the former of whom was born in 
Scotland and the latter in Ireland, and both mem- 
bers of the Catholic church. The father died in 
1873, ^nd was survived by his widow until 1888. 
Mr. O'Connor was a successful farmer m Indiana. 
Air. and Mrs. Gehring are the parents of ten 
children : Sarah A., Ellen E., William F., Julius 
W., Charles E., Jessie M., Francis G., Harry F., 
George D. and Helen Julia. 



T EMONT A. GATES, M. D., is a member of 
-L/ a family which has given several distinguished 
physicians and scholars to England and America. 
Dr. Lemont A. Gates, of Bridger, Mont., seems 
to have a sort of hereditary right to his profession. 
Nevertheless his skill and learning therein have 
been secured by arduous and intelligent efforts 
on his part. He was born at Brookfield, Mo., July 
28, 1873, the son of Edward E. and Emma (Thurs- 
ton) Gates, natives of New York and England, 
respectively. His grandfather came to America 
and settled in Oneida county, N. Y., where he was 
successfully engaged in the manufacture of candles 
until his death. His father removed to Missouri 
when he was a young man, and there engaged ex- 
tensively in the manufacture of boots and shoes, 
where he is still living, secure in the esteem of the 
whole community. 

The Doctor received his elementary education 
in the schools of his native town, and after leaving 
them went to Chicago and attended the North- 
western University (medical department), study- 
ing medicine under the tutelage of an uncle, Dr. 
E. H. Thurston, who had been an army physician. 
After remaining at the University one year he en- 
tered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at 
Keokuk, Iowa, from which he was graduated with 



io8o 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



honors in 1898, afterward serving as assistant in 
the pathological and bacteriological departments, 
being demonstrator. On leaving this institution 
he went to Thermopolis, Wy'o., and began the 
practice of his profession. He passed a year and 
a half there in successful practice and then came to 
Montana, locating at Bridger, where he has built 
up a large and lucrative practice. He has also 
opened a drug store at Bridger, which is conducted 
under his personal supervision and carries a large 
stock of standard drugs and other merchandise as 
properly belongs to this line of trade. 

A granduncle of the Doctor, Alfred Mercer, who 
graduated in medicine in England, came to Amer- 
ica and practiced at Syracuse, N. Y., where he 
still resides. He was the founder of the medical 
department of the Syracuse University, and is now 
emeritus professor and lecturer in that depart- 
ment. He also has sons who are professors in 
the same institution. The Doctor was married 
December 25, 1899, to Miss Janet Mowry, a native 
of New York state. He is an Odd Fellow and has 
passed the chairs. He is regarded as one of the 
leading physicians and surgeons of his section of 
the state, stands high in social circles in his com- 
munity, and has an influential voice in all mat- 
ters of public interest. 



HA. NOTTINGHAM.— Born in Pocahontas 
county, W. Va., June 7, 1855, on the western 
slope of the Alleghanies, in the midst of the cele- 
brated Pocahontas coal region, and reared with 
mountain and mining scenery all around him, it 
might not have been supposed that life in Mon- 
tana would present much that was novel or un- 
usual to Hilda Anderson Nottingham, the subject 
of this sketch, a well known and highly esteemed 
ranchman and cattleraiser of the Fort Benton 
neighborhood, Choteau county. And yet, so great 
is our country, and so various are its climates, 
pursuits and productions, that the same general 
physical conditions make necessary and exhibit 
so many widely different phases of life in different 
sections. 

Mr. Nottingham's father, Henry Nottingham, 
was a thrifty farmer in Pocahontas county, of the 
mountain state cut from the bleeding side of the 
Old Dominion by the relentless sword of Civil 
war, where he was born and reared, and con- 



tinued to till the soil until 1869, when he removed 
to Iowa, locating near Iconium in Monroe county, 
where he died in 1887. His mother, Martha 
(Wanless) Nottingham, was born in Bath county, 
W. Va., and died at their Iowa home in 1889, two 
years after her husband passed away. 

Mr. Nottingham was educated at the Brush and 
Potts district schools in his native county, and 
assisted his father on the farm until 1870, when 
he came to Montana and spent nearly six years 
in cattleraising and teaming at Boulder, the team- 
ing consisting mostly in hauling logs with a bull 
team. During this time he took the first cattle 
into the Musselshell country that were ever driven 
there, and for two summers trailed cattle to Chey- 
enne, Wyo. In the winter of 1876 he operated a 
trading post at the Big Bend of the Marias ; and 
spent the summer of 1877 freighting from Fort 
Benton and vicinity. In the fall of that year he 
was at Cow island, where Gen. Miles was fighting 
the Indians. That fall and the next spring he 
moved his cattle from Boulder to Teton valley, 
and later to the Highwood country south of Ben- 
ton. In the winter of 1878 he established a wood 
yard at the mouth of Arrow creek on the Mis- 
souri river, and for two years furnished wood to 
the boats on the river. In the meantime he lo- 
cated a ranch at Highwood Gap, which he sold 
in 1882. In 1880-81 he was on the cattle round- 
up in Choteau county ; and in the summer of 
1882 he located the ranch on which he now Hves, 
taking it up as a squatter claim, and since purchas- 
ing other claims until he owns a present acre- 
age of 1,500, besides leased lands and free ranges, 
all of which he devotes to raising cattle, horses 
and other live stock, and the grain and hay neces- 
sary for their maintenance. 

Mr. Nottingham is a Democrat in politics, and 
in his county is prominent and influential in the or- 
ganization and work of his party. He is a member 
9f Benton Lodge No. 25, A. F. & A. M., and 
finds much enjoyment in its meetings and the 
associations growing out of them. He was united 
in marriage in 1882, with Miss Ida Wareham, 
bom near Cedar Rapids, Iowa. They have three 
children : Ora Wesley, aged seventeen ; Hilda 
Bernard, thirteen, and Mable Viola, eleven. His 
new home in the far northwest has yielded him 
an abundance of substantial prosperity, a position 
of consequence and weight among his fellows, 
and social environment and enjoyment of wide 
extent and a high order. ' 




y^j^j/s^-izz^^j^^^^^ 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1081 



n^HOMAS D. GEARING.— One of the repre- 
1 sentative stock men of Cascade county is Mr. 
Gearing, who was born at Picton, province of On- 
tario, Canada, on May 30, i860, of stanch old Eng- 
lish lineage. His father, Collin Gearing, was born 
in England, from whence he came to Canada when 
a young man, locating at Picton, where he was en- 
gaged in merchandising until his death in May, 
1891. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary 
Barker, was born at Picton in 1834, where she was 
married in 1859, and where she still has her home. 
Thomas D. Gearing attended school until he 
was fourteen and then was a clerk in his father's 
store for two years. The next five years he was 
employed on a farm of an uncle, near Picton, and, 
in 1 88 1, came to Minnesota, where he devoted his 
attention to farming and lumbering until 1883. 
In this year he came to Fort Benton, Mont., and 
became a partner with J. C. McCuaig in herding 
sheep, which were "taken on shares" from Hon. 
Paris Gibson. This arrangement profitably con- 
tinued from 1883 until 1886, when Messrs. Gear- 
ing and McCuaig took up both homestead and 
timber claims at Dry Forks, Choteau county, and 
engaged in sheepraising on an extensive scale, 
running from 3,000 to 8,000 head until 1892, when 
Mr. Gearing sold his interests to his partner. In 
1883 also occurred the marriage of Mr. Gearing 
with Miss Ida S. Strum, who was born in Minne- 
sota. They have two children, Grace and Ma- 
bel. That same year he went to Great Falls, 
where he was located three years, within which 
time he held the contract for furnishing stone for 
the central school building. In 1896 he took up a 
desert claim of 160 acres, on Deep creek. Cascade 
county, and to this he has since added 320 acres, 
and here he has since been successfully engaged in 
the sheep business, having an average run of 4,500 
head. His ranch is well located and improved. 
In politics Mr. Gearing is a Republican. 



I AMES GORDON is one of the prosperous 
J ranchmen of Jefiferson county, who began Mon- 
tana life many years ago, in the primitive days of 
the territory as a miner. He is now located at Sil- 
ver Star on a large and valuable property. He was 
born at River John, Pictou county. Nova Scotia, 
on June 6, 1826, the son of David and Mary (Prin) 
Gordon. The father was a native of Nova Scotia 
and the mother of Switzerland. To them were 



born four sons and seven daughters. James Gor- 
don was educated in the public schools, but early 
manifested a desire for a sailor's life, and on leav- 
ing school he shipped before the mast. 

"Going to Liverpool he returned to St. 
John, New Bnmswick, then sailed to Grenock, 
Scotland, crossed the Atlantic again to Charles- 
ton, S. C, thence north to St. John. Joining the 
ship Clyde for London he there changed vessels 
for a return voyage. The Clyde had arrived at St. 
John before him and he sailed in her for Hull, 
England, went to London, from there took a voy- 
age on the Mediterranean, landing at Trieste, 
Austria, returning at once to Chatham dock yards 
in England. From London he shipped for New 
Orleans, from which city he, then a master, took 
a packet to New York. Visiting New Brunswick 
he met a friend and joined him in a voyage in his 
new ship to Cardiff, Wales, from there taking coals 
to Liverpool. Then came a five-months voyage 
to San Francisco, arriving therfe on April 4, 1851. 
The crew deserting the vessel for the mines, Mr. 
Gordon took a run to the Hawaiian islands, re- 
turning to again take ship to East India via the 
Straits of Tamah to Burmah. In his three- 
months stay there he witnessed many cruelties of 
the natives in one of their uprisings, and on March 
17, 1852, he sailed for England via the Cape of 
Good Hope, touching at St. Helena for water. 
Arriving at Falmouth, they had orders to go to 
London. After two months he went to Shields, 
Sweden, and to New York. On this voyage the 
vessel sprung a serious leak, and, sighting land, a 
vote was taken whether they should go to New 
York or make the nearest harbor. They took the 
latter course, putting in to Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
where the ship was condemned. Going home for 
the winter, in the spring Mr. Gordon shipped for 
Boston, then to New York, and then on ship In- 
vincible to San Francisco. This voyage lasted 
1 10 days, and here Mr. Gordon quit the sea." 

Mr. Gordon arrived at San Francisco in 1853, 
and remained two years there, most of the time 
being employed by the Pacific Mail Company. 
He then, for the first time, engaged in mining, go- 
ing to Eureka, passing six years in that district 
with poor success. In 1861 he went to Portland, 
Ore., from there by steamer to Lewiston, going 
to Orofino mines, thence to Elk City, Idaho. Then 
he came to Montana, arriving at Florence on De- 
cember 27, 1862. Here he passed the winter, and 
the next fall he went to Walla Walla, Wash., and 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



on the way there suffered much from a lack of pro- 
visions. Later he went to Boise City, in 1863, and 
then engaged in mining in Alder gulch until 1868 
with varying success. Mr. Gordon first engaged 
in general farming, an occupation in which he has 
found considerable profit, at Silver Star, in Madi- 
son county. Here he is largely interested in dairy- 
ing and stockraising on a valuable ranch of 560 
acres, usually wintering from 200 to 400 head of 
cattle in addition to other stock. 

In 1865 Mr. Gordon was married to Miss Han- 
nah Tuttle. Their four children are: Verina, 
William, James and Lucinda. For many years 
he has been a school trustee and once was elected 
county commissioner of Jefferson county, but re- 
signed. Fraternally he is a Freemason. The de- 
tailed life of- Mr. Gordon would be one of the 
most interesting among the Montana pioneers. 
He has followed elusive fortune on land and sea, 
and it is a strong testimonial to the possibilities of 
Montana that it was in this state he was destined 
to achieve a most pronounced success. 



JOHN S. GORDON, when but five years old, 
J left his native land in company with his parents 
and came to the United States. He was born at 
Kilraven, near Gatehouse, Scotland, October 4, 
1874, and spent a small portion of his childhood 
amid the scenes of that picturesque region. His 
parents were John and Anna (St. Clair) Gordon, 
natives of Scotland, where the father was a farmer 
and iron founder. When he came to this country 
with his young; family in 1879, he early secured 
employment in the Walter A. Wood mowing ma- 
chine works, at Hoosac Falls, Mass., later repre- 
senting the concern as agent in the Dakotas. In 
1884 he came to Montana, and in 1885-87 was 
head farmer at the Blackfoot Indian agency, with 
headquarters at the old agency on Badger creek. 
Thereafter he was engaged in freighting between 
Fort Benton and Depuyer for some months, and 
then went to Helena, where he was employed as 
head gardener at the Broadwater natatorium until 
1889, when he was accidentally killed. His wife, 
to whom he was married in 1871, is still living, 
making her home in London, England. 

Our subject came with his parents to ]\Iassa- 
chusetts in 1879, and after two years' residence at 
Hoosac Falls was sent to Canada for two years, 
and spent the next three following at his old home 



in Scotland. Returning to America in 1886 he 
located at Depuyer, Mont., and lived there four 
years, removing from there to Choteau in 1890. 
He secured a limited education in the public schools 
of Choteau. After leaving school in 1894 he 
taught school for two terms in Teton county, near 
Choteau, and for the following four years was 
bookkeeper for Joseph Hirshberg & Co., of 
Choteau. In the fall of 1900 he was the Repub- 
lican candidate for treasurer of Teton county, and 
was triumphantly elected. Since his term began 
he has demonstrated excellent qualifications for 
the office and is discharging its duties with im- 
partiality to the citizens and due regard to the 
interests of the county. Fraternally Mr. Gordon 
is allied with the order of Masons, being a member 
of Choteau Lodge No. 44, and to Fidelity Chapter 
No. 18, of the Eastern Star, as well as being a 
member of Chevalier Lodge No. 12, K. of P. He 
is also a member of Cottonwood Camp No. 214, 
W. of the W. He was married October 4, 1899, 
at Choteau, to Miss Hattie Edgar, who was born 
at Schuyler, Neb., November 6, 1879. They have 
one child, an infant, named John Edgar. Mr. 
Gordon is a highly esteemed citizen of his neigh- 
borhood, and one of the influential pubHc men of 
his county. He is yet young, and with his busi- 
ness capacity, his adaptability to public affairs, and 
the standing he has already secured in the regard 
of his people, has a very creditable and useful 
career before him. 



ARTHUR V. GIBSON, one of the most 
progressive and broad-minded citizens of 
Basin, Jefferson county, Mont., was born in Rich- 
land county. 111., on February 26, 1862. His 
father. Mason Gibson, was a native of West Vir- 
ginia, who, when a young man, removed to Illinois 
and settled in Richland county, where he remained 
until 1867, when he went to Missouri and located 
in Cedar county, where he engaged in ranching 
and stockraising until 1885, when he settled in 
Lewis and Clarke county, Mont., where he re- 
mained until his death in 1887. There were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Mason Gibson ten children, five 
boys and five girls, A. V. being the fifth child. 
The mother of Mr. Gibson, previous to her mar- 
riage with Mason Gibson in 1833, was Miss Polly 
Ann Stanley, a native of Kentucky. Her father's 
name was Hutchison Stanley, who had removed 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1083 



from Kentucky to Richland county, 111., where he 
was a farmer. 

Arthur V. Gibson was educated in Missouri 
and in the public schools of Illinois. Returning 
to Missouri he assumed charge of the homestead, 
later removing to Montana where he engaged in 
freighting and the livery business, interspersing 
these occupations with mining. In nearly all of 
his business ventures Mr. Gibson has been gener- 
ally successful. He was united in marriage with 
Orphia A. Fuson, daughter of Dr. Fuson, of Rich- 
land county, 111., who practiced medicine in Rich- 
land county for thirty- five years and until his 
death. In this practice he was succeeded by his 
fourth son. The elder Dr. Fuson was the father 
of twelve children, four girls and eight boys, of 
whom Mrs. Arthur Gibson was the fifth child. 
Mr. Gibson and his wife were married June 15, 
1893. Their family circle embraces two daugh- 
ters, Bernice and Vivian. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Odd Fellows and the Modern 
Woodmen. Politically he is a Republican and has 
ever manifested a lively interest in the various 
campaigns of his party. He is held in the high- 
est esteem by the citizens of Basin and by many 
others who are acquainted with him throughout 
the state. He is an excellent business man, ex- 
ercising unusual sagacity and the best of judg- 
ment, and, being a gentleman of the highest 
character, he enjoys the respect and confidence of 
all with whom he is thrown either socially or in a 
business wav. 



q^HEODORE A. GRAY.— The owner of 1,060 
1 acres of good ranch land and the lessee of 
640 more, on which he raises an average crop of 
200 tons of hay a year, besides large quantities of 
grain, and has a fine flock of sheep, Theodore A. 
Gray, of Philbrook, Fergus county, has the com- 
fort of knowing that his prosperity is the result 
of his own thrift, industry and skill. 

Mr. Gray first saw the light of day April 13, 
1857, in Walworth county. Wis. His parents were 
Alexander and Tirzah Gray, natives of New York 
state, from which they emigrated to Wisconsin in 
1844. There the father spent some years working 
at bricklaying, and the latter part of his life was 
a shoemaker. His death occurred January 15, 
1870. The family consisted of six children, of 
whom Theodore was the eldest. 

Theodore received little schoolinsr, for he began 



to work on a farm at the age of thirteen, receiving 
$5 a month, but pleased his employer so that he 
was advanced from time to time until his wages 
were $20 per month. In 1876 he came to Mon- 
tana, locating at Ten Mile gulch, where he was 
employed in ranch work by D. T. Goodell, at a 
salary of $45 per month until the spring of 1880, 
when he located his present ranch two miles west 
of Philbrook. When he took possession of it the 
buffaloes were still grazing on its borders. His 
claim was one that he pre-empted ; he has added 
to it by purchase until it embraces 1,000 acres, and 
he has in addition a section of leased land. He 
utilizes all this in ranching and raising sheep, and 
is making a gratifying success of the busmess. 

Mr. Gray is a member of the order of Knights 
of Pythias. In politics he is a Republican, and 
takes great interest in the success and welfare of 
his party. He is much esteemed as a good "all 
around'" man and citizen whom everybody respects. 



ALEXANDER C. GREENE. — The great 
ii stockgrowing and agricultural' industries in 
Montana have a worthy representative in the per- 
son of Mr. Greene, who is one of the leading and 
extensive factors in these lines in Fergus county, 
where he controls a large tract of valuable land 
and where he conducts his operations with marked 
ability and discrimination. Mr. Greene comes of 
stanch old Quaker stock, and is a birthright mem- 
ber of the Society of Friends. He is prominent in 
local affairs and honored as one of the distinctive- 
ly representative men of this section of the state. 
Such men lend dignity to a publication of this or- 
der and by consideration of their careers the work 
finds its most ample justification. 

Alexander C. Greene claims the old Empire 
state of New York as the place of his nativity, 
having been born in West Almond, Allegany 
county, on the 25th of September, 1857, the son of 
Abram S. and Mary P. Greene, who were likewise 
born in the same state, where the respective fami- 
lies were established in an early day. Abram S. 
Greene devoted twenty years of his early manhood 
to the tanning and shoemaking business in Al- 
bany county, N. Y., but eventually engaged as a 
pioneer in the heavy forests of Allegany county 
and devoted himself to agricultural pursuits, at 
which he continued until his death, which occurred 
at Byersville, West Sparta, N. Y., on the 7th of 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



March, 1901, in the fullness of years and honors. 
His devoted and cherished wife passed away in 
1878 at the Byersville homestead, and they are 
survived by four children, whose names, in order 
of birth, are as follows: Emily L., Theodore S., 
Alexander C. and Egbert R. The father was a 
prominent and influential member of the Repub- 
lican party in his locality, where he was at various 
times incumbent of offices of public trust and re- 
sponsibility, including those of justice of the peace, 
county assessor and county commissioner, in 
which last he served for several terms. He was a 
colonel in the New York militia, and for a time 
held a captain's commission in the Civil war. 
Both he and his wife were birthright members of 
the Society of Friends, and their lives were ever 
in harmony with the teachings of this noble organ- 
ization. 

Alexander C. Greene, to whom this sketch is 
dedicated, received excellent educational ad- 
vantages, having secured preliminary discipline 
in the public schools, after which he continued his 
studies in the academy at Angelica, Allegany 
county, N. Y., and thereafter completed a course 
in the Dansville Seminary. At the age of seven- 
teen he put his scholastic acquirements to the prac- 
tical test by engaging in pedagogic work, continu- 
ing to teach in liis native state for seven years 
and then identifying himself with agricultural pur- 
suits. 

In 1886 Mr. Greene decided to cast in his 
fortunes with Montana, whose fame was begin- 
ning to spread abroad, made his way hither and 
located in the Judith basin, where he took up a 
pre-emption claim, to which he eventually added 
360 acres adjoining, and he was successfully en- 
gaged in the raising of cattle for four years. In 1890 
he located a homestead claim twelve miles west of 
Utica, Fergus county, and later secured desert 
land to the aggregate area of 200 acres. At the 
present his landed estate comprises 3,200 acres, of 
which 1,000 acres is available for cultivation. He 
controls other lands in this section, bringing his 
total acreage up to fully (),ooo acres. In 1889 Mr. 
Greene associated himself with Messrs. Charles H. 
Perrine and Burton C. White in the raising of 
sheep upon an extensive scale, first as Perrine, 
Greene & White, and later as the Buffalo Creek 
Sheep Company. This company now exists. Mr. 
Greene, however, sold his stock in the company on 
the 1 2th of April, 1900, to Mr. White, but he has 
since individually continued operations in the same 



line. He now has extensive sheep interests, rais- 
ing a high grade of animals in this line, as he 
does also of cattle and horses. He has a distinct- 
ive capacity for affairs of breadth and importance, 
and his discrimination and excellent management 
have resulted in success unequivocal in character 
and which places him among the leading ranchmen 
of the state. 

As a stalwart Republican Mr. Greene takes an 
active and intelligent interest in the questions 
and issues of the hour, while he is prominent in 
the local councils of his party and in all that tends 
to conserve the best interests of his section of the 
commonwealth. He has never been an aspirant 
for political preferment. Fraternally he is identi- 
fied with the Masonic order, holding membership 
in Lewistown Lodge No. 2i7> of Lewistown, Hiram 
Chapter No. 30, also of Lewistown, and he has 
passed the chivalric degrees in Black Eagle Com- 
mandery of Knights Templar at Great Falls. He 
is also a member of the Benevolent Protective Or- 
der of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. On Oc- 
tober 29, 1900, Mr. Greene was appointed post- 
master of the newly-created postoffice of Greene, 
Fergus county. 

At Nunda, N. Y., on the 25th of September, 
1876, Mr. Greene was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary A. Perrine, of West Sparta, Livingston 
county, N.- Y., a daughter of James and Elizabeth 
Perrine. (See sketch of Charles H. Perrine on 
another page.) Mr. and Mrs. Greene are the par- 
ents of five children, namely: Mildred, Archie, 
Ralph (deceased), Hattie (deceased), and James. 
Mr. and Mrs. Greene and their children have the 
sincere friendship of the community and merit this 
tribute in a compilation which gives representation 
to the honored citizens of Montana. 



pHARLES H. GREGORY was born in Broome 
V county, N. Y., May 27, 1861, the son of George 
L. and Eliza E. (Rikard) Gregory, natives of that 
state. The Gregory family came from England 
in Colonial times and settled in New England. 
The Rikards were of German ancestry. George 
L. Gregory made New York his home and was en- 
gaged in farming until his death, which occurred 
when he was but twenty-seven years old. The 
family, consisting of the widow and three sons, re- 
mained on the homestead, and Charles secured his 
education in the schools of his native county. In 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



[085 



1881 he left home and spent one summer in Min- 
nesota, removing from there to Illinois where he 
engaged in railroading for a year and then re- 
turned to New York. He was married in April, 
1882, to Miss Carrie E. Wrigley, a native of Lack- 
awanna county, Pa., and daughter of A. and Mary 
E. (Chase) Wrigley, the former a native of Eng- 
land and the latter of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gregory have five children : Floyd E., Harry W., 
Florence M., Charles A. and Helen M. After his 
marriage Mr. Gregory remained in New York 
state in the vicinity of Deposit, holding many posi- 
tions of trust in his home town and county for a 
few years, and then removed with his family to 
Lincoln, Neb., where he was employed for two 
years in the supply department of the Burlington 
Railroad Company. He then became timber fore- 
man for J. H. McShane & Co., occupying that 
position for three years, at the end of which he 
came to Montana and located in Carbon county, 
on Clark's Fork, four miles southeast of Gebo. 
After living there for a time he sold the ranch, 
took up his residence in Gebo and engaged in mer- 
cantile business and was also postmaster for three 
years, when he sold his interests in the town and 
located on his present ranch, having purchased the 
Indians' rights. The land is all under irrigation 
and is well adapted to the business of farming and 
stockraising. He has a fine property in a very 
choice location, and is a progressive, enterprising 
and intelligent farmer, and is a useful and highly 
esteemed citizen. He has always taken a deep in- 
terest in local affairs, and has rendered good ser- 
vice to his community in various ways. He has 
been a school trustee for a number of years, and 
in the fall of 1900 was elected to the legislature as 
one of the representatives of his county. His 
course in the legislature was highly commended 
and redounded greatly to the advantage of his con- 
stituents. 



HERMAN W. GRUNWALDT, secretary and 
treasurer of the American Brewing and Malt- 
ing Company of Great Falls, and a prominent resi- 
dent of that city, first came to Montana in 1895. 
He was born in Milwaukee, Wis., on April 13, 
1867, the son of Henry and Emily (Behling) Grun- 
waldt, both natives of Prussia. The father was 
born on INIay 24, 1834, and the mother on Feb- 
ruary 5, 1828. Henry Grunwaldt came to the 
United States in 18^7 and located on a farm near 



Milwaukee. He followed this occupation for sev- 
eral years, and finally platted the property, which 
was adjacent to the city, into city lots, which sold 
rapidly, and is now retired from business in Mil- 
waukee. 

Herman W. Grunwaldt was ■ reared in Mil- 
waukee, received here his elementary education 
in the public schools, and the high school from 
which he graduated. At the age of seventeen he 
became connected with the shoe manufacturing 
company of Reals, Torry & Co., with whom he 
remained two years. He then went with Gender 
& Paeschlet, leading manufacturers of tinware, 
and with this prominent firm he remained nearly 
nine years, principally engaged in ofifice work. In 
1895 Mr. Grunwaldt came to Great Falls, and was 
one of the organizers of the American Brewing 
and Malting Company, of which a history is given 
in another portion of this work. He was chosen 
secretary and treasurer, which position he has 
held ever since. 

At Milwaukee in 1891 Mr. Grunwaldt was mar- 
ried to Miss Helen Lambrecht. They have no 
children. Mr. Grunwaldt has three brothers, 
Otto, Gustave and Emil, all farmers on valuable 
properties in the environments of Milwaukee. 
Politically the affiliations of Mr. Grunwaldt are 
with the Republican party, in which he is an in- 
fluential worker. He is not a member of any fra- 
ternal society. He is highly respected by all the 
numerous friends with whom he has been brought 
into connection, either in a business or social waj'. 



WILLIAM GRILLS, a member of the board 
of aldermen of the city of Great Falls, who 
is recognized as one of its capable and enterprising- 
business men, is a native of Canada, born on a 
farm near Toronto, on July 23, 1867. His father, 
William Grills, born in England, emigrated to 
Canada when a young man, and was engaged in 
agriculture near Toronto until his death, which 
occurred in 1871, when William was but four years 
of age. Although thus deprived of the care of a 
father, his widowed mother accorded him the most 
solicitous attention. Her maiden name was 
Jiannah English, and she is of Irish extraction, 
and now residing in Manitoba, Canada, at a ven- 
erable age. 

William Grills remained on the home farm until 
he had reached his legal majority, having received 



PROGRESSIVE -MEN OF MONTANA. 



the educational advantages of the public schools 
of Toronto. In 1888 he came to "the states," lo- 
cating near Langdon, N. D., where, for three years 
he conducted a large wheat farm on shares. In 
the spring of 1891 he came to Great Falls, working 
in various restaurants for three years, becoming 
thoroughly familiar with the business, so that he 
was amply fortified for this enterprise when, in 
1894, he opened the Palace restaurant on First 
avenue, south, which he successfully conducted 
for four years, when, selling it, he purchased a 
half interest in the Progress restaurant, which is 
most eligibly located in Second street, and the 
operation of this popular resort has been con- 
ducted under the firm name of Grills & Gardner. 
They exercise great care in catering to a discrim- 
inating patronage, and their place holds marked 
prestige for the excellence of its service. 

In politics Mr. Grills is a stalwart Democrat, 
and has always manifested a lively and active inter- 
est in local public affairs. In 1897 he was elected to 
represent the Second ward on the board of alder- 
men, and was chosen as his own successor in the 
city council at the election of 1899, and again he was 
chosen to succeed himself for the third term in 
April, 1901. Mr. Grills was a charter member of 
Progress Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of which he 
is past chancellor, and he enjoys marked popu- 
larity in both business and social circles, and is a 
recognized factor in the business life of the city 
of his home. On December 31, 1895, in Great 
Falls, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Grills 
and Miss Annie King, whose parents are of Irish 
lineage, with their home at Fountain, Minn. 



HENRY GROVER.— It is much to the credit of 
a man to win from his friends and neighbors 
a complimentary nickname, which by common ac- 
ceptance is indicative of his character and stand- 
ing among them. There is oftentimes more in 
such a sobriquet sincerely applied and fairly 
earned, than could be otherwise expressed in para- 
graphs or pages. It is so in the case of "Honest" 
Henry Grover, of Hamilton, one of the most en- 
terprising and progressive fruitgrowers and farm- 
ers of the Bitter Root valley. Mr. Grover was 
born on February 5, 1853, at Ogden, Utah, the 
son of Jared and Eveline (Riddle) Grover, natives 
of Iowa and Tennessee. He was the first born of 
eight children and received his early education in 



the public schools of Nevada, supplementing this 
with a hard and trying experience as a cowboy for 
ten years in that state and eastern California, after 
which he teamed and freighted for five years in the 
same locality. In 1882 he came to Montana and 
settled in the Bitter Root valley, three miles north- 
west of Hamilton, where he has since resided con- 
tinuously except three years when he was run- 
ning a stage. 

Mr. Grover has a fine farm of 160 acres, a beau- 
tiful and comfortable home, and one of the best 
orchards in this section of the country. It con- 
sists of twenty acres planted with choice fruit 
trees, which are now in good bearing condition 
and yield annually large crops of the best fruit pro- 
duced in the state. He ships its products to all 
sections of the northern belt of the United States 
and southern belt of Canada, and realizes hand- 
some profits. In political fealty Mr. Grover is a 
Democrat and in fraternal relations a member of 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen, in which 
he holds the rank of past master workman and 
been three times the representative to the grand 
lodge. He was married on December 12, 1874, 
at Big Pine, Cal., to Miss Mary E. McMurry, 
daughter of J. W. and Matilda McMurry, her 
father being a prominent farmer and merchant of 
that place. They have had seven children, of 
whom but these four are living, Inez M., Alvie M., 
Leland V. and Loretta. Mr. Grover has lived 
among this people one-fifth of a century and has 
so demeaned himself that now there is not one but 
does him reverence. His home is everybody's 
fireside who comes .as a guest ; his wife is the 
priestess of the house and the almoner of a gen- 
erous but judicious charity to those in need and 
the center of a refined social circle ; his children are 
the light of his home and the delight of his numer- 
ous friends. His life is passing profitably in use- 
fulness to his kind, his community, his state and 
his country. 



THOMAS HALL, one of the early pioneers 
and most successful stockraisers and ranch- 
men of Boulder valley, Jefiferson county, was born 
in Swanington, Leicestershire, England, on May 
21, 1845, the son of Thomas Hall, of the same 
nativity. Emigrating to the United States in 
i8('-.r), he came almost directly to Boulder valley, 
this state. Until he came Mr. Hall had no ade- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1087 



quate idea of the vastness of the territory, the 
possibilities and the manifold advantages of the 
new country to which he had turned his face. 
Neither had he a conception of its difficulties and 
dangers. To say that he has used the former 
wisely and met the latter courageously and tri- 
umphantly is but small praise of the excellent 
qualities of mind and heart possessed by him. 
On the boat coming up the Missouri river he 
had a very distinguished companion; Col. C. A. 
Broadwater, who was then making his first trip 
into the country in which he was destined to play 
so conspicuous a part. On arriving Mr. Hall 
entered the service of the Diamond R Company, 
with whom he remained one year. He then moved 
on to Silver Bow creek where he engaged in 
placer mining. At the time he paid his initial visit 
to Butte, the town consisted of but six small 
cabins and two saloons, and, as the expression 
was then, they had a "dead man every morning 
for breakfast." He worked during the winter 
of 1867-8 at the Cable mine in Deer Lodge county. 
In 1868 Mr. Hall returned to England, where 
in the fall of 1870 he was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Limm, a native of Hucknell, Notting- 
hamshire, in that country, and it was not until 
1876 that Mr. and Mrs. Hall returned to the 
United States, and to Boulder valley, where he 
took up government land, about one mile from 
Boulder. Here he has since made his home, suc- 
cessfully following ranching. Five children have 
been born to them, Jane, Willis and Andrew in 
England, Allie and Laura in Montana. Mr. Hall 
has had many interesting and some thrilling ex- 
periences in Montana, among which may be noted 
that he dug the first grave made for a white man 
in the Boulder valley, that of John Carris who 
met his death by accident; that he ran one of 
the first tunnels made in Butte for Capt. Wall, 
and that he was at Fort Benton the day on 
which Gov. Meagher was supposed to have jumped 
off the boat and drowned. It will be seen from 
the foregoing that the story of Mr. Hall's life is a 
tale of two countries and that he has lived under 
two flags. Still, there is today no more patriotic 
American in every sense of the word than Thomas 
Hall. He has always taken a deep interest in 
church and temperance work, and is recognized 
as a man of earnest convictions and the strictest 
probity. Financially he has been eminently suc- 
cessful, and is regarded by all who know him as 
a citizen of progressive ideas and broad views. 



V'AN HENDERLIDER, who was among the 
V earlier settlers of Cascade county, and well 
known as an enterprising and successful stock- 
grower, was born in Jackson county, Ind., March 
II, 1840. He is the son of Martin and Rachael 
Henderlider, natives of Kentucky. The father was 
devoted to agricultural pursuits and removed from 
Kentucky to Indiana as early as 1828. He lost 
his wife, the mother of our subject, on March 
19, 1 865, and was himself called from earth on 
January i, 1873. Both parents were earnest and 
devout members of the Methodist church. Politi- 
cally his active sympathies were whh the Demo- 
cratic party, he never failing to cast his vote for 
the candidates of his party. 

Van Henderlider received an excellent educa- 
tion in the common schools, supplemented by two 
terms at the Heartsville University, of Indiana. 
Until he was twenty-six years of age he re- 
mained with his parents, his father having given 
him when he arrived at the age of eighteen an 
interest in the homestead. Having passed two 
years in travel Mr. Henderlider located in Neosha 
county, Kansas, where he was engaged in general 
farming until 1876. Owing to the coiitinual annual 
raids of grasshoppers he suffered a total loss of 
crops, and in company with Mr. J. C. Bundy he 
removed to Colorado and, with fair success, fol- 
lowed the business of freighting. He then came 
to Montana and settled at a place known as Pig's 
Eye basin, Fergus county, at the headwaters of 
Judith river, but in July, 1883, he located at the 
mouth of Government coulee, remaining until 
1886, when he removed to "Never-sweat coulee," 
where he at present resides. Since 1886 he has 
devoted his entire time to the cattle industry in 
which he has been eminently successful. In his 
politics he is a Populist. 

J. C. Bundy, the partner of Mr.'Henderlider, has 
been actively engaged in the cattle business since 
1881 ; the two now have a herd of 300 head on 
a range of 2,320 acres, including leased lands. It 
is situated eighteen miles southeast of Belt, 
is largely devoted to the cattle industry and slightly 
to the cultivation of wheat, oats and hay. Mr. 
Bundy, unlike his partner, is a Democrat, as he 
savs "until he dies." 



T EONARD HERBOLSHEIMER, of Cascade 
L/ county, residing near Eden, is a young man 
who has been quite successful in the stock business 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



in that locality, and now owns a fine ranch of 640 
acres. He was born at Bavaria, Germany, on 
April 9, 1865. His parents were Moritz and 
Elizabeth (Geim) Herbolsheimer, both natives of 
Bavaria, where the father was a shoemaker. In 

1876 his wife, the mother of Leonard, died and in 

1877 he remarried with Miss Mary Casinger. 
Leonard H. Herbolsheimer attended school in 
Bavaria until he was fifteen years of age. He seri- 
ously objected to his father's intention of teaching 
him shoemaking, and in July, 1881, the family 
emigrated to the United States. They located at 
Marysville, Kan., where they engaged in farming 
until 1887, and Leonard also was engaged in the 
manufacture of sausage. 

At the age of twenty-three years, Mr. Herbol- 
sheimer was united in marriage to Miss Bertha 
Meisenbach in 1888, daughter of Carohne and 
Edward Meisenbach, of whom a sketch appears 
on another page. Of their seven children three 
are dead, John, Elsie and Moritz. The four liv- 
ing are Minnie, Alma, Edna and George. In 
1889 Mr. Herbolsheimer removed to Great Falls, 
where he again engaged in the sausage business, 
which he continued three years and during this 
time he took up pre-emption and tree claims of 
160 acres each, of which he cultivated five acres of 
the pre-emption and ten of the tree claim, later 
he purchased 160 acres, and took up a home- 
stead claim in 1893, and now has ninety acres 
under cultivation, producing phenomenal crops. 



V\J ECKFORD MORGAN.— The beautiful Gal- 
VV latin valley is peopled by many of the pio- 
neer settlers of Montana, and Mr. Morgan is one 
of its numerous prosperous representatives. He 
was born in Vermillion county. 111., October, 1837, 
the son of Josiah and Susan (Hoskins) Morgan, 
natives of the Old Dominion, where the ances- 
tral families flourished . for many generations. 
Uriah Morgan, grandfather of our subject, was 
an active participant in the war of 1812, and a 
lineal descendant of Gen. Daniel Morgan, of Revo- 
lutionary fame ; also Gen. John Morgan, famous 
for his raids during the Civil war. As a young 
man Josiah Morgan removed to Illinois, becoming 
one of her early pioneers, but in 1849 he removed 
to Iowa, where he devoted his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits until his death, in 1866. He 
left four sons and three daughters, of whom six 
are now living. 



Weckford, son of Josiah Morgan, received his 
educational training in Iowa, devoted his attention 
to farming until 1863, and at the age of twenty- 
six set forth for Montana, the then western fron- 
tier. The long and toilsome overland trip was 
made memorable by its hardships, but no serious 
trouble occurred with the Indians, though the red 
men did succeed in running off a number of horses. 
Mr. Morgan arrived in Bannack in July, 1863, 
remaining a few days, and then engaged in put- 
ting up hay for William Ennis. One month later 
he went to the great placer mining camp in Alder 
gulch, engaged in mining until the fall of the 
following year, and then started on the overland 
trip for his old home in Iowa. At that time road 
agents were plentiful, and a sharp lookout for 
those desperadoes was necessary. Reaching Iowa 
in safety he remained until the following sum- 
mer, when he returned to Montana and engaged 
in ranching at the conflux of Beaver creek and 
the Missouri river for two years, and then made 
the trip down the Missouri river from Fort Ben- 
ton to Iowa, where his marriage was soon after- 
ward solemnized and where he resided until 1869, 
when he removed to Kansas and engaged in farm- 
ing until 1881. lUu the many attractions of Mon- 
tana again lured him within her borders. Com- 
ing to Bozeman, he there purchased of Robert 
Barnett a tract of land on Flathead creek to which 
he has added until his present ranch property com- 
prises 720 acres. He conducts farming operations 
upon an extensive scale, devoting his attention 
principally to wheat. The ranch has the best of 
permanent improvements, and the progressive 
methods which Mr. Morgan has pursued in carry- 
ing on his agricultural enterprise in this favored 
section of the state have been attended with grat- 
ifying success and made him one of the substantial 
men of Gallatin county. His farm is located six 
miles south of the hamlet of Gallop, his postoflice 
address. In addition to his attractive farm dwell- 
ing Mr. Morgan has a fine residence property in 
Bozeman, where the family pass the winters, and 
the children are afforded superior educational ad- 
vantages. In politics our subject exercises his 
franchise in support of the principles and policies 
of the Democratic party, and for many years has 
been a member of the school board, taking a 
deep interest in educational work and all other 
worthy and legitimate objects which tend to ad- 
vance the interests of the community. 

In Iowa, on December 12, 1867, Mr. Morgan 




>^^S,^^^ a^<:^^Pc^^^ 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Jane 
[Morgan, a native of Wheeling, Wood county, 
born May 8, 1848, the daughter of Oliver and 
Roann (Springer) Morgan, both natives of Vir- 
ginia, as were also her paternal grandfather and 
great-grandfather — David Morgan and Zachariah 
Morgan. They are the parents of seven children, 
namely : Bertha, the wife of Perry Knowlton, a 
successful young ranchman of Gallatin valley; 
Oliver Perry, a resident of Bozeman ; Joseph and 
Gertrude, who remain at the parental home; 
Emile, wife of Charles Cameron, and Herbert and 
Zadock, at home. Joseph, the second son, was a 
member of Company C, First Montana Volunteer 
Infantry, under Col. Kessler, was in active ser- 
vice in the Philippines, and participant in twen- 
ty-nine engagements with the insurgents, receiv- 
ing his honorable discharge at San Francisco, 
October 17, 1899. 



^ Y' ILLIAM J. JACKSON.— The subject of this 
VV review, now one of the progressive farmers 
and stockgrowers of Fergus county, has passed 
practically his entire life in America, since his par- 
ents emigrated from Ireland to Canada within the 
year of his birth, the date of his nativity being 
August 4, 1842. His parents, George and Eliza- 
beth Jackson, were likewise born in Ireland, 
whence they came with their family to Canada, 
where they have ever since resided, the former 
having devoted his attention for many years to 
carpenter work, in which his efiforts were attended 
with a due measure of success. He is now retired 
from active business. His political sympathies 
are in acctjrd with the Liberal party, and he and his 
wife have long been members of the Presbyterian 
church. Of their nine children two are deceased, 
Sarah and Maggie, those surviving are George, 
William J., Mary, Catherme, Jane, Emerson, Nel- 
son and James. 

WilHam J. Jackson was reared and educated 
in Canada, where he assisted his father until he 
had attained his twenty-third year, when he en- 
gaged in farming until January, 1891, when he 
came to Montana, with whose industrial life he 
has since been identified. He at once became a 
resident of Fergus county, his first place of loca- 
tion having been at Ubet. He subsequently re- 
moved to the vicinity of Philbrook, where he took 
up a homestead claim of 160 acres and devoted 



his attention to farming and sheepgrowing for 
two years, during which time he was associated 
in the sheep industry with Fred R. Warren. In 
1893 Mr. Jackson purchased eighty acres, located 
one and one-half miles west of Utica of B.- 
Gray, and later bought 800 acres on Sage creek, 
while he also controls 1,560 acres of rented 
land. He raises large crops and high-grade cat- 
tle, having now a herd of about 500 head. From 
1898 until 1901 Mr. Jackson also conducted a 
meat business in Utica, which he sold to Isaac 
F. David. His ranching enterprise is conducted 
under the title of W. J. Jackson & Sons, and his 
sons have shown themselves to be able and hon- 
orable young business men, valuable co-adjutors 
of their father. In his political adherency Mr. 
Jackson is identified with the grand old Republi- 
can party, and fraternally he is identified with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order 
of Foresters. He is held in high esteem in each, 
as he is also in all the relations of life. The religious 
faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian 
church. 

On the 23th of January, 1864, Mr. Jackson 
was united in marriage to Miss Jane Dalyish, who 
was born in Canada, the daughter of Peter and 
Elizabeth Dalyish, natives respectively of Scot- 
land and Ireland. The father is a successful farmer 
of Canada, a supporter of the Liberal party, a 
member of the Presbyterian church and identi- 
fied with the Society of Orangemen. His wife 
died in 1886, and was survived by seven chil- 
dren : Agnes, Lucy, Grace, John, Robert, Emily 
and Jane. Mary, Anna, Elizabeth and Sarah are 
deceased. ]\lr. and Mrs. Jackson are the par- 
ents of nine children, namely: William J.. Jr.. 
Peter. Howard, Edward, Clinton, Elizabeth, 
Grace, Mary and Lucy. The family home is one 
of attractive order and here a genial hospitality 
is dispensed. 



n ICHMOND A. JELLISON.— Born and 
1\ reared in the lumber woods of Maine, and 
compelled by the conditions of his family to bear 
his portion of the labor incident to providing a 
livelihood therefor as soon as he was able to be 
of use. which was when he was ten years old, 
the subject of this review was able to secure but 
little scholastic training, and was obliged to rely 
mainlv on the lessons of experience in contact 
with the busy world for what he has learned. 



logo 



FROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



He was born in Hancock county, Me., Decem- 
ber 9, 1854, the son of Reuben and Eliza Jellison, 
also natives of IMaine, where the father was en- 
gaged in lumbering and farming. He was prom- 
inent in his locality, and actively connected with 
public affairs in a local way, serving his county 
in the state legislature and taking a leading part 
in the community. He was a Republican in poli- 
tics, and both he and his wife were consistent 
members of the Baptist church. They were the 
parents of fifteen children, of whom only five are 
living, and of these Richmond is the youngest. 

Richmond A. Jellison remained with his par- 
ents until he was twenty-one years old. He then 
spent six years learning and working at the car- 
penter's trade in his native state, and in 1881 came 
to Montana, locating first at Fort Benton, later 
at Sand Coulee, and still later at White Sulphur 
Springs, working at his trade at each place. In 
the meantime he had secured by homesteading 
and purchase a ranch of 860 acres and engaged 
in raising horses. Of his land 250 acres are under 
cultivation, and yield annually abundant crops. 
The ranch is located a mile and a half east of 
Philbrook, and is in a high state of cultivation. 

Mr. JelHson was united in marriage Christmas 
day, 1886, to a lady of the same name. Miss Monira 
Jellison, daughter of Nathaniel and Mary E. Jel- 
lison, all natives of Hancock county, Me., and 
emigrants from that state to Montana, where her 
father is now a successful rancher. Eight chil- 
dren have blessed their marriage: Aura, Geneva, 
Irving, Agnes, Dianthia, Lee, Schuyler and Colin, 
all of whom abide with them in their pleasant 
home. In political relations Mr. Jellison is a 
Republican, and among the fraternal orders he 
l:)elongs to the Knights of Pythias. 



I ENIZEN BROTHERS.— This title refers to 
_| and includes a family of four brothers, well 
known to the sheep and cattle trade and the 
traveling public on account of their business en- 
terprise, progressive methods and their unstinted 
and gracious hospitality. They are Edward M., 
Charles V., Albert and William C. They are the 
sons of Michael and Regina (Schultz) Jenizen, 
the former a native of Nanci, France, and the 
latter of Sarbricken. Germany. Their grand- 
father Jenizen was a captain in the gend'armes 
on the border in .Alsace-Lorraine. He had pre- 



viously been a member of Napoleon's army and 
received his appointment to this post through 
meritorious service. Their grandfather Schultz 
immigrated to America in 1848, having been en- 
gaged in the rebellion in Germany just prior to 
that time. He located in Pittsburg, having in his 
possession a piano, which was one of the first seen 
in that city and was exhibited as such at the Cen- 
tennial exposition in Philadelphia. On his farm 
near the city a portion of the Carnegie works at 
Homestead are now located. Michael Jenizen, 
father of the brothers, came to America in 1847. 
He was employed as heater at the rolling mills 
at Sligo, a mile south of Pittsburg, for twenty- 
two years. He was industrious and frugal, and 
by judicious investments in real estate grew rich. 
He had property at Homestead which he sold in 
1866 for $16,000, and also owned fifteen city lots 
in Braddock's field, opposite Homestead. After 
selling his Homestead property he removed to 
LaSalle, 111., and there erected a glass factory. 
But owing to the difficulty of securing coal he 
changed his base to Peru, where he erected an- 
other. These were the first glass works in Illi- 
nois except a bottle factory in Chicago. His 
venture proved unprofitable and he returned to 
Pittsburg in 1869. He sold his lots in Braddock 
and opened a dry goods store on the south side 
in Pittsburg. Four years later the financial panic 
compelled him to suspend and he returned to his 
trade for a livelihood. In 1879 he came to Mon- 
tana, located on the Musselshell twenty miles east 
of Harlowton and engaged in raising cattle and 
sheep until his death in 1888 at the age of seventy- 
four. His family consisted of eight children. The 
four sons were born at Pittsburg: Edward M., 
Charles V. and Albert were educated at the La- 
Salle (111.) Academy, Charles V. finishing in Chi- 
cago and at Pittsburg. They all remained with 
their father except Edward M., who came to Mon- 
tana in 1874 and engaged in ranching and later 
in mining, and then for two years was with Col. 
DeLacey and Mr. Kellogg, on a surveying expedi- 
tion. When the rest of the family arrived, in 1879, 
they all located on the ranch now occupied by 
Edward and Albert, and conducted it under the 
firm name of E. M. Jenizen & Bros. After six 
or seven years of united effort the father and 
\\'iltiam C. withdrew from the partnership and 
removed to Careless creek, where they started a 
sheep ranch, Edward and Albert having ])urchased 
their interest in the homestead. This is a fine and 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1091 



well improved ranch of more than 25,000 acres, 
all fenced in, of which 2,500 acres are irrigated 
and under cultivation. They have some 12,000 
sheep, 1.300 cattle, and 100 Norman horses of 
superior quality. The ranch is a stopping place 
for all travelers, and all are welcomed with gen- 
uine and courtly hospitality. 

Edward M. Jenizen was born at Pittsburg, Pa., 
2\larch 15, 1857, and began there his education, 
which was finished at LaSalle, 111. He was mar- 
ried in June, 1889, to Miss Louise Jenizen, a native 
of Philadelphia, Pa., who died in 1892, leaving one 
child, Nicholas Edward. His second marriage, 
which occurred in June, 1898, was to Mrs. Cather- 
ine McGregor, a native of Limerick, Ireland, and 
daughter of John Hickey, a prominent dairyman 
of that city. He is a member of the Woodmen 
of the World and the Brotherhood of American 
Yeomen. 

Albert Jenizen was born in Pittsburg, Pa., in 
January, 1855, and received his education in the 
public schools of that city. He came to Mon- 
tana in 1877 and joined his brother Edward. 

Charles V. Jenizen was born at Pittsburg, Pa., 
April 14, 1853, and was educated at LaSalle (111.) 
Academy, in Chicago, and at Pittsburg. He was 
married in July, 1873, to Miss Caroline Bender, 
of Pittsburg. Their children are : .\lbert, de- 
ceased; Regina, deceased; Edward, Joseph, Rob- 
ert, Carrie and Alice. 

William C. Jenizen, who is in Jiusiness (in his 
own account, was born in LaSalle, 111., in 18O0, 
and was educated in Pittsburg, Pa. Having sold 
his ranch property on the Musselshell and Care- 
less creeks, where he and his father were .in busi- 
ness together until the death of the former, he 
is taking a course in assaying and kindred subjects 
through the International School of Correspond- 
ence, of Scranton, Pa. He has yet, however, a 
"band of 12,000 sheep which he has out on shares. 
He is a gentleman of superior intelligence, much 
reading and reflection, and on all subjects relat- 
ing to sheep and cattle is considered a reliable 
authority throughout a large territory. 

The old cabin in which the Jenizens first found 
a home in Montana is still standing on their 
ranch, and is occupied. It was originally a fort, 
Ijeing on a trail crossed by the Crows and Piegans 
on their way to Fort Benton Indian agency. The 
portholes are stopped up, and what was once a 
warlike defense is now a peaceful habitation. It 
must be said, however, that the Indians never mo- 



lested the Jenizens, but always acted well toward 
them. The residence of the brothers is an artis- 
tic log building, elegantly furnished and comfort- 
able in ever}- sense. They are themselves a credit 
to the comnuniity, a benefit to the county and state, 
and a benefaction to mankind. 



EDWIN N. JOHNSON.— Located nine miles 
north of Wolf creek, Mont., is the handsome 
property of one who has led a life of strange 
vicissitudes and adventure. It is the home of Ed- 
win N. Johnson, who was born m Rock Island 
county. 111., on July 25, 1835, the son of Moses 
and Katherine A. Johnson. The father was a na- 
tive of New Jersey, the mother of Switzerland. 
In early life Moses Johnson followed shoemaking, 
but later was a successful farmer. Both himself 
and wife were members of the United Brethren 
church and politically he was a Republican. The 
father died in May, 1871, his wife surviving him 
until 1899. Edwin Johnson received the benefits 
of education in common schools until he was 
twelve years of age, when he was hired out at farm 
work for $7.00 a month and board. Two years 
later he decided to make a living for himself, 
and went to Siou.x City, Iowa, in 1856. Here 
he worked one year on a farm for $16 a month, 
saved money and began peddling among the 
Sioux, buying brass rings, beads, knives, etc., 
which he traded for furs at a handsome profit. 
In this business he continued three months, clear- 
ing .$800. At one time he traded an old shotgun 
to an Indian for a musket. It was a hard bar- 
gain for the Indian, and he took a shot at Mr. 
Johnson, who chased him jnto the river, but the 
Indian swam through floating ice to the other 
shore in safety. Once with sixty other men Mr. 
Johnson killed nineteen hostile Indians. While 
on their trail they discovered five white children, 
ranging in age from six weeks to eighteen months, 
with their brains battered out and nine men and 
women with their heads split open. 

Drawing $900 from the bank Mr. Johnson jour- 
neyed down the JNlissouri and Missirsippi rivers 
from Sioux City to St. Louis and New Orleans. 
Thence he made the return trip by steamer to 
Cincinnati, and near there secured employment 
on a farm. Three months later he went to Chi- 
cago, visited friends and relatives, then crossing 
into Michigan he located at Grand Rapids, but 



1092 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



returned to Rock Island, 111., where he was for 
five years engaged in farming. He enlisted in 
1862 and remained with the Union army two years 
before being regularly mustered into service. Dur- 
ing that time he experienced much hard fighting 
and endured many privations. Following the 
"Morgan raid" he served as guard over that dash- 
ing Confederate general. He obtained a fur- 
lough of six weeks and was taken ill at Rock 
Island, and on his recovery rejoined his regiment 
and participated in the battle of Duvall's Blufif, 
Ark. Following a sharp fight at Pine Blufif in 
which 700 prisoners were captured, his regiment 
there went into winter quarters. At the close of 
the war he returned to Bloomington, 111., where 
he was mustered out of the service. He en- 
gaged in farming in Illinois for fifteen years, and 
removed to Iowa where he farmed successfully 
for nine years, and for eight years later he resided 
in Richardson county. Neb. Mr. Johnson came 
to Montana overland in 1878 with two teams, the 
trip lasting two months. Shortly afterwards he 
located at Craig, where he rented fifty acres of 
lantl. Subsequently he removed to his present 
ranch, a homestead claim of 160 acres, where he 
is now profitably engaged in stock raising. On 
October 3, 1861, he was married to Miss Susanna 
Tennis, born in Valparaiso, Ind. She is the daugh- 
ter of William and Delia Tennis, the mother a 
native of Tennessee, and the father of Kentucky. 
They were members of the United Brethren 
church, and died, the father in 1861, the mother 
in 1885. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have one child, 
George T. They are members of the Presbyterian 
church and are greatly respected. 



/ ^ E( )RGE JOHNSON, whose fine stock ranch 
Vl is located eight miles south of the city of Deer 
Lodge, in the beautiful valley of the same name, 
is one of the representative farmers and stock- 
growers of this section, and through his own ef- 
forts has attained a success worthy the name in 
Montana, where has been his home for over a 
quarter of a century. Mr. Johnson was born in 
Denmark on April 5, 1856, the son of Christian 
and Annie ijorgenson) Johnson, also natives of 
Denmark, where the father, who devoted his act- 
ive life to the vocation of a carpenter, still main- 
tains his home, his wife having passed away in 
1858, when her son George was but two years of 



age. He subsequently married JMary Nelson, and 
both are living at the old home in Denmark. 

George Johnson was reared in his native land 
to the age of fifteen years with liberal educational 
advantages. He then left his home and set forth 
for America. He landed in Quebec, Canada, and 
thence proceeded directly to Council Bluffs, Iowa, 
where, and in Omaha, he passed two years. He 
had devoted one year to carpenter work with his 
father in Denmark, and engaged in this line after 
coming to the west. In the summer of 1873 Mr. 
Johnson came to Montana, and he has never had 
cause to regret his choice. His location was first 
in the Scott Hotel at Deer Lodge, and after 
eighteen months employment here he was engaged 
at the McBurney House. In the spring of 1875 
he became connected with ranching, working for 
wages until the fall of 1876, when he filed claim 
on 160 acres of government land, now a portion 
of his present fine landeci estate, and soon after- 
ward purchased forty acres of unimproved rail- 
road land contiguous to his original homestead. 
A'Tr. Johnson then purchased a house which stood 
four miles south of Deer Lodge and moved it to 
his farm, upon which he at once began to make im- 
provements, showing great discrimination in them 
and during the years intervening he has accom- 
plished much through his energy and progressive 
methods. 

His ranch now comprises 415 acres, all well im- 
proved, while the original primitive dwelling has 
been replaced by a fine two-story brick residence, 
of attractive design and equipped with modern 
conveniences. Mr. Johnson devotes his attention 
especially to the raising of cattle and sheep, hav- 
ing usually about 100 head of cattle, while at the 
time of this writing he is associated with his 
lirother in the ownership of a band of 2,500 sheep. 
Mr. Johnson came to this county with no capital 
but his ability, and he has become one of the rep- 
resentative stockgrowers of this valley entirely 
through his own industry and well directed efforts. 
His postofficc address is Racetrack, the office be- 
ing locatetl two miles south of his residence. In 
politics Mr. Johnson is a stalwart Republican, 
though in local affairs he is independent of strict 
])arty lines, voting for suitable men and meas- 
ures. He has served seven years as justice of 
the peace. In religious faith Mr. Johnson and 
his family are members of the Morrisite church. 
On Julv I, 1876, Mr. Johnson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Josephine V. Oleson, a native of 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1093 



Wyoming, the daughter of Ole and Anna Ole- 
son, who emigrated from Denmark to America in 
i860. Mrs. Olson died in Wyoming in 1862, and 
then the family lived for a time in Idaho, whence 
Mr. Oleson finally removed to that part of Montana 
now Powell county, where he died in June, 1888. 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have nine children, Mary, 
William, Lillie, Olga, Ruby, Emma Louise, Vonnie 
and Inez. 



I HUMPHREY JOHNSON, M. D. — The 
J youngest of nine children of Rev. Leonard 
and Harriet N. (Hatch) Johnson, all of whom 
have rendered good service to their country in 
civil or military life. Dr. J. Humphrey Johnson 
is true to the traditions of his family and the 
training he received in having lived an upright, 
useful life and made the most of his opportunities. 
He was born at Binghamton, N. Y., August 7, 
1850, where his father, an eminent Presbyterian 
preacher and a native of Vermont, died in 1858. 
His mother, also a native of Vermont, died in 
1 881. The Hatch family first settled in America 
in 1635, near where Falmouth, Mass., now stands. 
One of the descendants was Capt. Zephaniah 
Hatch, of Connecticut, who in the early part of 
the eighteenth century was a master mariner and 
engaged in the West India trade. Timothy, the 
head of Mrs. Johnson's branch of the family, was 
born in 1757. He entered the Colonial army at 
the age of nineteen, and took part in the battle 
of White Plains, where he was taken prisoner, 
and was thereafter confined in the Bridewell pris- 
on at New York. The Doctor had four brothers 
in the Lfnion army during the Civil war. The 
oldest, L. M. Johnson, was a surgeon with the 
rank of major; G. M. T. was a member of the 
First New Jersey Cavalry, under Gen. Kirkpat- 
rick : Joseph M. was a captain, and William E. 
was a member of the Twenty-seventh New York, 
participated in thirteen engagements and received 
a medal for personal bravery at the battle of 
Antietam. Two others were professional men : 
Charles H., a practicing physician, and Uriel C. 
an attorney at law. 

Dr. Johnson received his scholastic training in 
the schools of Binghamton, N. Y. He was then 
appointed deputy clerk of Broome county, hold- 
ing the position for nine years, after which he 
entered the medical department of the University 
of the City of New York, from which he gradu- 



ated in 1879. He returned to Binghamton and 
entered upon the practice of his profession, and 
was elected coroner, but after serving four years 
resigned, going to Oregon, and upon his return 
continued practicing in Binghamton and Lebanon, 
N. Y., when he came to Montana in 1891, locaiing at 
Red Lodge, where he practiced until 1899, and then 
removed to Bridger to accept the position of 
physician of the mines. He has been active in 
politics as a Democrat and in the fall of 1898 was 
elected as a member of the Sixth legislature of 
Montana. He is a Master Mason, a Knight of 
Pythias and an Odd F"ellow. On February 17, 
1874, he was married to Miss Catherine M. Brown, 
of Binghamton, a daughter of Charles AI. Brown, 
of that place. They have three children: Mary 
M., now Mrs. S. H. Gledden, of MinneapoHs, 
iVnna A. and Joseph Hatch. 



PETER JOHNSON.— Among those who have 
come from the far northland to cast in their 
lot with Montana, and who have here attained 
success through their own well directed efforts, 
is Mr. Johnson, who is one of the prominent and 
influential farmers and stockgrowers of Powell 
county, his postofifice address being Racetrack. 
Mr. Johnson was born in Denmark on November 
5, 1848, the son of Christian and Annie (Jorgen- 
son) Johnson, both of whom were born in the 
same fair land, where the father still maintains 
his home, the mother being deceased. Peter John- 
son was reared upon the homestead farm in his 
native land, and there received his early educa- 
tional discipline. He acquired the trade of car- 
penter under the effective direction of his father, 
who had followed this and farming for many 
years. 

In 1866, when in his eighteenth year, Mr. John- 
son came to America with a number of other 
Danes from the same vicinity, and his success in 
the new world shows that he is the possessor of 
those sturdy characteristics of the Danish race 
which make recruits from that land most welcome 
in the American republic. Landing in New Yorkj 
Mr. Johnson thence proceeded to Oshkosh, Wis., 
where he arrived without sufficient mone_\- to buy a 
meal and was entirely among strangers. His sturdy 
integrity and self-reliance stood him well in this 
emergency, and, though unable to speak Eng- 
lish, he showed himself so ready to undertake 



I094 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



any legitimate work that came to hand that he 
was soon able to find profitable employment at 
his trade. Within two and one-half years, such 
had been his industry and economy that he was 
enabled to return to Denmark for the one who 
had been waiting and hoping and biding the time 
when he should come to her and repledge their 
mutual faith. There he was married, on Decem- 
ber 24, 1868, to Miss Hannah Jensen, the daughter 
of Jens and Bodel (Hansen) Rasmussen, who in 
later years emigrated to America, where they 
passed the residue of their lives. Mr. Johnson 
returned with his bride in the spring of 1869, lo- 
cating at Council BlufTs, Iowa, where he followed 
his trade until June, 1872, when he located at 
Warm Springs, Deer Lodge county, Mont. 

Here he turned his attention to farming, and 
he also erected the flouring mill at Warm Springs 
shortly after his arrival. Within a year Mr. John- 
son purchased 160 acres in Deer Lodge county, 
now in Powell county. He took up his residence 
on his ranch, which was entirely unimproved, be- 
ing new bench land, and he has since made there 
the best of permanent improvements, erecting a 
fine residence and other requisite buildings and 
bringing the place under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He now has 200 acres of excellent farming 
land, much of it seeded to clover and alfalfa, and 
the place is devoted principally to the raising of 
cattle of excellent grade. He usually has about 
100 head of cattle, and is also associated with his 
brother George in the sheep business, running 
an average of 2,500 head. He has shown marked 
enterprise and business sagacity, and is held in 
high esteem as one of its representative citizens. 
He gives his support to the Republican party and 
its principles. To Air. Johnson and his wife ten 
children have been born; two of the number, An- 
nie and James, are deceased, the others being: 
Annie (2d), William, George, Aimer, Hiram, Eva, 
Waldmer and Edward. 



REUBEN JOHNSTON, one of the successful 
and prosperous ranchmen of Broadwater 
county, was born in Allegany county, N. Y., on 
March i, 1845, the son of Richard and Abi (Pear- 
son) Johnston, both natives of Allegany county, 
where they were married and to them were born 
three sons and three daughters. All the sons 
served in the Civil war, two of them losing their 



lives, John dying while a member of a New York 
regiment, and LTbert killed while serving in an 
Iowa regiment of cavalry. The father, a farmer, 
removed his family in 1855 to Rock county. Wis., 
where he still continued farming, developing a fine 
estate from the prairie wilderness. Reuben John- 
ston enHsted on January 15, 1862, in the regular 
army under Col. Pitcher, at Janesville, Wis. He 
first went to Harper's Ferry, and was employed 
in provost duty. He participated in the second 
battle of Bull Run, and those of Cedar Mountain, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and the 
Wilderness, and, having served courageously and 
efficiently through the war, on January 15, 1865, 
he received an honorable discharge at Wilming- 
ton, Del. Following this he served one year as 
under sheriff and jailor of the Rock county. Wis., 
jail. 

In the spring of 1866, ]\Tr. Johnson started for 
Montana, a fellow traveler with John C. Picker- 
int!', one of the prominent Alontana pioneers, and 
the overland trip was long, dangerous and event- 
ful. Arriving at Virginia City, Mont., in the last of 
July, he remained until the spring of 1867, engaged 
in mining with fair success, but the stampede to Sal- 
mon river carried him with it. There, however, he 
remained only a month, but went on to Diamond 
City, and stayed there until spring, with unflattering- 
success. Mr. Johnston then made his permanent 
home in Missouri valley, homesteading a ranch on 
Clear creek, on which he is now pleasantly located, 
surrounded by all the comforts possible to a ranch- 
man's life, and extensively and profitably engaged 
in fruit growing, having some 1,500 bearing ap- 
ple trees, 200 prune and a large number of cherry, 
plum and other fruit trees. He also raises large 
quantities of strawberries and raspberries and 
grows heavy crops of alfalfa. 

Mr. Johnston was united in marriage in Rock 
county. Wis., to Miss Annie Earl, born on July 
31, 1847. She is the daughter of Thomas Earl, 
a native of near Glasgow, Scotland. Coming to 
the United States in 1832 he settled in Kentucky, 
where he followed his trade of wheelwright. Here 
he married Miss Mary Ann Waters, and in 1846 
removed with his family to Wisconsin, where he 
made his permanent home and engaged in farm- 
ing. Two of the six children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnston are living, Herbert Earl and Florence, 
a teacher. Leila, May, Fred and Viola are dead. 
Herbert Earl Johnston was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and Northern Indiana Business Col- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1095 



lege, at Valparaiso. Subsequently he taught 
school for two years, and then engaged in busi- 
ness at \\'inston, Mont., where he is now in trade 
and also postmaster. On January 11, 1899, ne 
married with Miss Henrietta Durnen, a native of 
Montana, and daughter of E. P. Durnen. Polit- 
ically Reuben Johnston has affiliated with the 
Republican party. In its various campaigns he 
takes an active interest and is an influential 
worker, while for a number of years he was school 
trustee and clerk. Fraternally he is a member 
of the United Workmen and Mrs. Johnston is 
a member of the Degree of Honor. The Montana 
life of this early territorial pioneer has been emi- 
nently successful. He is a man of broad, pro- 
gressive views, sound business judgment and up- 
right character. 



FRED. JORDAN.— Born in the great metrop- 
olis of the country June 9, 1849, ^"d reared 
and educated in that center of civilization, busi- 
ness and culture until he was twelve years old, 
Fred. Jordan has seen many phases of life and of 
human nature, had many thrilling adventures and 
interesting experiences, and faithfully discharged 
his duties in many lines of useful activity. 

Mr. Jordan's parents, Henry and Sophia Jor- 
dan, were natives of Germany, and immigrated 
to New York city when they were young. The 
father followed in that cit>; his trade of metal 
spinner, and after a life of usefulness and credit 
died there January i, 1876; the mother preceded 
him to the grave some fourteen years, having 
died in 1862. Mr. Jordan attended the public 
schools of New York until 1861, and was then 
sent to live with a Dr. Uhl, near LaCrosse, Wis. 
In 1866, he enhsted in the Fourth United States 
Infantry, and was stationed for a month at New- 
]5ort, Ky., and then at Fort Sedgwick, Neb., until 
1867. From there he was transferred to Fort 
Laramie, Wyo., where he remained until 1871, 
when he was discharged from the service. In 
1873 he engaged in freighting from Cheyenne to 
Laramie, Sidney, and Red Cloud, Neb., and the 
S])otted Tail agency. In 1875 he sold his outfit 
and the next year drove a team of cattle for a 
freighting firm from Red Cloud to Spotted Tail, 
but Ijefore the end of the year went into the em- 
ploy of Messrs. Yates & Brown who had the con- 
tract for supplying hay to the government at 



Fort Custer. In the winter of 1877 he made a 
trip to Cheyenne, taking what were supposed to 
be the remains of Gen. Custer, found on the scene 
of the massacre, which were shipped to Maine. 
During the next two years he was prospecting in 
the Black Hills and hunting in the Gallatin valley. 
In the spring of 1880 he was on the Musselshell 
round-up, and the rest of that year was in the 
employ of the Davis, Hauser, Stewart Cattle 
Company, until near its close, when he became 
an employe of the Diamond R Freighting Com- 
pany, with which he remained continuously for 
fourteen years. In 1894 he took up a ranch in 
the Bull Hook basm, near Havre, and was there 
engaged in raising stock until the spring of 
1900. when he sold the entire property to Mr. 
Frederick Schwartz. Since then he has been liv- 
ing at Havre, giving his attention in various wa\ s 
to public afifairs and the general welfare of the 
community. He is a Democrat in politics, ar- 
dently interested in the success of his party, but 
not an active partisan in the sense of concerning 
himself particularly with the control of party 
work or seeking favors at the hands of the organ- 
ization. Mr. Jordan is energetic ' in business, 
broad of view in matters of general interest, en- 
tertaining in social relations, and firmly estab- 
lished in the confidence and esteem of those who 
have the pleasure of his acquaintance. 



HARRISON JORDAN, one of Montana's 
prosperous ranchers and general farmers, re- 
sides in a beautiful modern residence in Pleasant 
Valley, Jefferson county, Mont. He was born in 
that portion of southern Illinois called Egypt, on 
March 17, 1825, and is the son of William F. and 
Isabelle (Painter) Jordan, both natives of Ken- 
tucky. They married in Illinois and there en- 
gaged in farming until 1847, when they came to 
Pleasantville, Iowa, where the father continued 
agriculture until his death. The maternal grand- 
father emigrated from Germany, while the Jor- 
dans are of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Harrison 
Jordan passed his boyhood days in Illinois, re- 
moving in 1847 with his father's family to Pleas- 
antville, Iowa, a town surveyed and platted by 
his brother Wesley. In 1846 three of the Jor- 
dan brothers enlisted in Company A, First Illinois 
Volunteers, for service in Mexico under Capt. 
James D. Morgan and Col. John J. Hardin, who 



1096 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



was killed at Buena Vista. After a few weeks 
passed at Alton, their {dace of rendezvous, they 
went to San Antonio, T^x. • Their first engage- 
ment with the Mexican troops was at the battle 
of Buena Vista. After the close of the war he re- 
turned to Illinois, and was mustered out at 
Ouincy. 

Air. Jordan then went to Iowa and remained 
there, teaching school and serving as clerk of the 
board of county commissioners until the winter 
of 1851-2, and as town agent he laid out the town 
of Indianola, in Warren county. In the winter of 
1851-2 he went to California by the Isthmus of 
Panama. He there engaged in dairymg until the 
spring of 1855, then came back to Iowa and for 
seven years was engaged in merchandising. Dis- 
posing of this in 1862 he went to Colorado, cross- 
ing the plains with mule teams. He there en- 
gaged in the dairy business for a year and again 
went to California, going by mule team, and re- 
maining for a time at Carson City, Nev. In the 
spring of 1864 Mr. Jordan came back to Mon- 
tana, bringing a carefully-selected stock of mer- 
chandise for miners. He arrived at Alder gulch 
on July 17, 1864, and started a store. The ven- 
ture, however, was not successful, and he re- 
moved in 1866 to Fish creek, where he engaged 
in ranching and dairying. Here was his home 
for thirty-two years until 1898 ; for the latter part 
of the time he engaged in stockraising. In 1898 
he disposed of his holdings and removed to his 
present home in Pleasant Valley. 

The political affiliations of Mr. Jordan are with 
the Democratic party, in whose interests he is a 
hard worker and influential. In the sessions of 
the Montana territorial legislature of 1866 and 
1872 he ser^-ed as a member, and in 1874 he was 
chairman of the board of county commissioners 
of Jefferson county. For the past thirty years he 
has been a notary public, and for many years a 
school trustee. Fraternally he has passed the 
chairs of his Odd Fellows' lodge, and in 1850 he 
was made a Mason, in which order he was ad- 
vanced to the Royal .\rch degree in 1855. On 
November 28, 1850, Mr. Jordan was united in 
marriage to Miss Catharine Tuttle, of Alansfield, 
Ohio, born on February 14, 1836. She is the 
daughter of David Tuttle, of Long Island, N. 
Y., and. Lucinda (Cornwall) Tuttle, a native of 
Canada. When quite young David Tuttle re- 
moved with his father from Xew York to Ohio, 
later to Indiana, and still later to Iowa. In the 



last state they remained for some time and then, 
with Mr. and Mrs. Jordan, came to Montana. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jordan have six children : Celeste 
Grace, now Mrs. W. W. McCall ; Violet Jose- 
phine, now Mrs. Reese Wampler, residing in 
Pony ; Perneca Etta, now Mrs. Arthur Phelps ; 
Ida Isabel, now Mrs. F. A. Riggin ; Walter Ma- 
rion, now residing in Helena, as pastor of the 
First Christian church, and Jasper O. On No- 
vember 28, 1900, Mr. and Airs. Jordan celebrated 
their golden wedding, which was attended by 
four children, a number of grandchildren and one 
great-grandchild. The general health of each of 
the excellent couple is good, and Mrs. Jordan is 
still able to read small type without glasses. At 
present they afford every indication of living to 
celebrate their diamond wedding. Probably no 
people in the state have more or warmer friends. 
Their home is an old-timer's home, where the latch- 
string hangs out, and where honesty, integrity 
and rectitude crown the results of well-spent lives. 



MAJ. JAAIES B. CAMPBELL.— The history of 
Montana covers little over a third of a cen- 
tury, yet it is full of high examples of noble man- 
hood and womanhood with deeds that stir the blood 
and furnish themes of ennobling interest and loft\- 
character. None of these is more suggestive and in- 
teresting than the life story of the late Alaj. James 
Blackstone Campbell, of old Gallatin City. He was 
born and passed his early life in Maury county, 
Tenn., his birth occurring on October 15, 1799. In 
1825 he made his home at Vandalia, 111., and being 
well qualified for any business, he was soon 
appointed clerk in the auditor's office, then held by 
Col. E. E. Berry. About 183 1 he married Miss 
Sarah A. Kain, a beautiful and accomplished young 
lady of Carlyle, 111., and, removing to the north- 
eastern part of the state, became one of the enter- 
prising business men of the then little village of 
Chicago. He was a genial, generous and captivat- 
ing gentleman, and readily won the friendship of 
his associates. He was also sagacious and for- 
tunate in his investments, and was soon recognized 
as a very successful operator in real estate and as 
one of the rich men of the town. Later through 
generous endorsements for friends he lost heavily 
and became financially embarrassed. Not disheart- 
ened, however, he sought new fields of enterprise 
in the farther west, for whose rough and hazardous 




^ 4^i^^^^^y^y^V^<:^ 




—V ^fi y /C-4»^t-yy<- i^-i-^^ 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1097 



life he was well fitted by nature and training. He 
was fully six feet tall and well built, and was an 
amateur athlete of note, having the reputation of 
being able to outrun, outwrestle and outfight any- 
thino^ he came in contact with. He was also an 
accomplished violinist, and had other graceful and 
attractive attainments. In 1852 he removed with 
his wife, two sons and five daughters to Missouri, 
where he remained ten years and, in 1862, brought 
part of his family overland to Montana, leaving the 
two younger children in a Missouri school. 

The trip was made with teams of horses, and the 
Major brought with him some cattle which took 
prizes at the first Helena fair. The Indians were 
very troublesome and one night they stole all the 
horses of the party. The night before a good look- 
ing stranger rode up to their camp and spent the 
night. He left at daybreak, and when their horses 
were stolen they thought he had something to do 
with the theft and it became known later that he 
was the notorious George Ives, afterwards hanged 
by the Vigilantes. The Major and his party arrived 
at Bannack on July 20, 1863, and after temporarily 
stopping- in a number of places, he finally located 
at Gallatin, and took up a ranch across the river, 
where he resided until his death on January 3. 1873. 
I\Irs. Campbell was a most estimable lady, beau- 
tiful in form and features, and is lovingly remem- 
bered by the numerous beneficiaries of her bounty, 
that was never withheld from any person in need 
who came within her knowledge. She died on 
]\Iarch 13, 1875. 

Their youngest daughter. Miss Fannie Campbell, 
now generally considered the first woman in Mon- 
tana to take up a homestead in her own name, was 
■one of the two children left in Missouri. She and 
her sister, Anna, joined the Montana portion of the 
family in 1865, making the trip up the ]\Iissouri to 
Fort Benton, their father meeting them 200 miles 
below the fort. While on the wa\- the steamer on 
which they were traveling sank at De Soto, and she 
Avas obliged to wait a week for another boat. Later 
this boat got on a sand bar and while the men were 
looking for the channel the Indians captured one 
of them and two others were shot. !\[iss Campbell, 
at her father's death, took charge of the homestead 
and continued to manage that and her own ranch 
which adjoined it, until a few years ago, when she 
sold it and bought the Joe \Mlson ranch, on whicii 
she at present resides, and raises numbers of fine 
stock. In 1897 she had a serious fire in her out- 
buildings, including the large historic stable in 



which the first United States court in ^Montana was 
held. She also has a piano which was brought into 
the valley in 1866, and is yet a remarkable sweet- 
toned instrument. Miss Campbell has, as a mem- 
ber of her family, Samuel Weir, who came across 
the plains with her father, and has seen the pleas- 
ures, the vicissitudes, the varieties and the strange 
experiences of pioneer life. Among the events of 
strange interest which he distinctly remembers was 
the hanging of Jack Gallagher, Boone Helm, Hayes 
Lyons, George Parish and Clubfoot George by the 
X'igilantes. It was a thrilling incident and he re- 
members all the details with remarkable distinctness. 

The life of Maj. Campbell and his family was 
well epitomized in the following tribute from the 
pen of Right Reverend Bishop Tuttle : 

"In December, 1867, when I was chaplain of the 
house of representatives of the ^Montana legislature, 
I first met James Gallagher, who was a member of 
that body. He had married Helen, daughter of 
jMaj. Campbell, and she passed part of the winter 
in Virginia City where the legislature was sitting. 
On December 8, in the hall on Jackson street in 
which we were holding religious services, I bap- 
tized Cornelia and James, two of the Gallagher 
children. I remember well Mr. Gallagher's intelli- 
gence and philosophical imperturbability. On Julv 
8, 1868, I made my first visit to Gallatin City, and 
held services in ^laj. Campbell's cabin, and there 
on that date baptized Donnie Shafer, an adult, and 
Fannie Campbell Dunbar and Susetta Rosaline, n 
young Indian girl. At this time I first met 
Mrs. Campbell. Strength of character and sweet- 
ness of nature were wonderfully blended in her. 
A lady in every sense of the word, a Christian of 
holv and humble devotion, a glad and generous 
minister of hospitality, with a queenly dignity to her 
friends and all benighted wayfarers, she was withal 
a motherly helper of unfailing kindness and won- 
derful efficiency to all around her, far and near. 
Gentle of touch, sympathizing in soul, skilled in 
nursing, almost expert in medicine and surgery, 
she was an angel of mercy and succor to all. Her 
active, untiring and loving unselfishness and help- 
fulness caused her to be warmly and gratefully 
loved by all who knew or heard of her. For several 
rears I stopped at the Campbell cabin on my jour-. 
neys. i\Irs. Campbell was always good and kind 
to me and it is a pleasure to me to drop this tear 
of grateful remembrance to her memory. The 
Major was kind and generous, but bold and fiery, 
with a loving admiration for his wife that was really 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



chivalrous devotion and reverence. Gurdon Camp- 
bell, the son, who kept the store at "The City," 
had been injured in infancy, a slight deformity of 
neck and spine was resultant. But he was a most 
intelligent man and highly educated. It was a 
pleasure and a profit to converse with him and 
evoke the treasures that were stored in his well- 
disciplined mind and memory. Mrs. Gallagher, 
JNIrs. Dunbar and Fannie Campbell were the three 
daughters. They all inherited the strength and 
sweetness of character of their mother, and the 
standard of society for the entire Gallatin valley 
was elevated and purified by their presence. The 
vigor, impetuosity and forcefulness of Maj. Camp- 
bell : the gentleness, grace and sufficient helpfulness 
of Mrs. Campbell ; the superior ability and accom- 
plishments of Gurdon Campbell; the patience and 
philosophy of Judge Gallagher ; the cheery industry 
of Frank Dunbar; the culture and refinement of 
the three daughters ; and the happy and buoyant 
lives of the Gallagher and the Dunbar children 
in the days of their early childhood, how the picture, 
sweet and strong and gracious, comes over me now, 
softened in the light and memories of thirty-four 
years. Ah, how the years do fly, and the loved 
friends disappear. Daniel S. Tuttle. St. Louis, 
.Mo., November i8, 1901." 



JAMES E. KANOUSE, one of the represent- 
.ative business men of Broadwater county, is 
a pioneer of Montana. Prior to locating in this 
section of the west he rendered valiant service in 
the war of the Rebellion. Mr. Kanouse is a na- 
tive of Woodstock, N. J., where he was born on 
December 18, 1845, the son of Jacob A. Kanouse, 
a native of New York. The father removed with 
his family to McLean county, III, in 1855, locat- 
ing in Lexington, where our subject continued his 
studies in the public schools until the outbreak 
of the war, when he promptly gave evidence of his 
patriotism by going to Peoria and there enlisting 
as a member of Company D, Eleventh Illinois 
Cavalry, under Col. Robert G. Ingersoll, and 
forthwith went to the front with his regiment, 
participating in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, 
.Corinth, luka, Jackson, Tenn., and all the minor 
cavalry engagements in which the regiment took 
part up to his final muster out, December 19, 
1864, at Memphis, Tenn., as sergeant of Com- 
pany D. He then returned to Illinois, and in 
1865 was solemnized his marriage to Miss Nancy 



Ballard. He and his wife joined his father and 
with several others started for Montana, organiz- 
ing a train at Omaha, and thence coming up the 
north side of the North Platte river. At Big 
Horn they were joined by another train, and soon 
afterward had trouble with the Indians, who 
stampeded and lun off the mules of one of the 
trains. The party then built a fort and awaited 
the arrival of ox teams from Bozeman. After 
the teams arrived they continued their journey to 
Bozeman, where the company disbanded. Mr. 
Kanouse remained in Bozeman and vicinity until 
the spring of 1867, devoting his attention to 
farming, and then removed to Virginia City, 
where for several months he acted as agent for 
the A. J. Oliver Overland Express & Stage Line. 
He then located in New York gulch, where his 
father had secured some mining properties. 
They prospected the same with poor success, ex- 
pending both time and money without any ma- 
terial returns. In the spring of 1868 Mr. Kan- 
ouse removed to Deep creek, where he effected 
the purchase of the ranch of W. Burris, in Mis- 
souri valley. Here he has since been extensively 
engaged in the raising of livestock, his home 
ranch being well improved and located three miles 
south of Townsend, his postoffice address. In 
company with J. R. Marks Mr. Kanouse also en- 
gaged in opening mines in the Duck creek and 
Park districts, and has also devoted considerable 
attention to the freighting business since 1868. 
Mr. Kanouse is a mar of business ability, and his 
well-directed and progressive methods have given 
him prestige as one of the leading business men 
of his county. He is one of the interested ])rin- 
cipals in the Townsend Mercantile Company, 
and is president of the State Bank of Townsend. 
Mr. Kanouse has always manifested a lively inter- 
est in all that concerns the progress and material 
prosperity of the state. He was a member of the 
constitutional convention which formulated the 
present constitution of Montana. Politically his 
support is given to the Democratic party, and 
was elected to represent his county in the Elev- 
enth assembly of the territorial legislature. He 
was admitted to the bar of Montana in 1882, but 
has never given his attention to the active prac- 
tice of the law as a vocation. Fraternally he is 
identified with Knights of Pythias and the Order 
of Pendo, in the former of which he passed all the 
official chairs. He has one son and two daugh- 
ters : Charles, AHce and Clara. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1099 



J P. KEARNS, cashier of the State Bank of 
Townsend, and nephew of Hon. W. E. Tier- 
ney, was born at Benton, Wis., on December 29, 
1871, the son of James Kearns, a native of Ire- 
land, who emigrated to the United States in 1848, 
where he engaged in the grocery business for a 
number of years, dying in 1893. J. P. Kearns 
was educated in the public schools of Benton and 
Bayless Business College in Dubuque, Iowa. 
Returning to his Wisconsin home he passed some 
years with his father and later himself and broth- 
er, Samuel J. Kearns, took their father's business, 
which they successfully conducted, at the same 
time engaging in farming. 

J. P. Kearns was postmaster of Benton from 
1893 to 1897, and remained in business with his 
brother until the spring of 1899, when he re- 
moved to Montana, leaving considerable real 
estate in Wisconsin, but selling his interest in the 
grocery to his brother, who still conducts it. 

Mr. Kearns came to Townsend in the spring of 
1899, purchased a home and m June of that year 
established the State Bank of Townsend, he being 
one of the corporators and a stockholder. He 
has ably filled the position of cashier from the 
organization of the bank, and through his finan- 
cial ability has added to the pronounced success 
of this solid financial institution. On November 
7, 1894, Mr. Kearns was united in marriage to 
Miss Sadie Curley, a native of Galena, 111., a 
daughter of A. B. Curley. They have two chil- 
dren, Marv Kathrvn and John Claire. 



MARTHA A. KEARNS.— It is gratifying to 
note the conspicuous position which wo- 
men hold in educational work in Montana, and 
the precedence which is theirs can not but prove an 
object lesson to those older commonwealths 
where such privileges are largely denied them. 
Determinate executive capacity, indefatigable 
efifort and a deep and unwavering interest have 
characterized their work here, and the result has 
been manifest progress of the schools. Mrs. 
Kearns. who is superintendent of public schools 
in Cascade county, with her home in Great Falls, 
is a native of Westernport on the Potomac river, 
Maryland, where she was born on May 20, 1872. 
Her father, A. P. McAnelly, is a native of the 
Emerald Lsle, who, coming to the United States 
in 1840, located on a large plantation near West- 



ernport, which he conducted for many years. In 
1877 he removed to Fort Dodge, Iowa, where he 
leased coal mines from the Fort Dodge Coal 
Company, successfully operating them until 1885, 
when he was for five years in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Angus. From Angus Mr. McAnelly re- 
moved to Montana in 1889, and he is now living 
retired, in Belt. Mr. McAnelly married Miss 
Agnes Coleinan, also born in Ireland, though 
reared and educated in Glasgow, Scotland. At 
the age of twenty she came to the United States, 
living first in Pennsylvania and then in Maryland, 
where her marriage to Mr. McAnelly was sol- 
emnized in 1858 at Westernport. She has been 
the cherished companion of her husband for more 
than two score years and is now sixty-five years 
of age, her husband having attained that of sev- 
enty-seven years. 

jNIartha A. (McAnelly) Kearns was excellently 
educated in the public schools of Fort Dodge, the 
high school at Angus, Iowa, and at the Drake 
University at Des Moines, and continued her 
special technical studies in the normal school at 
Fremont, Neb. She had engaged in pedagogic 
work while yet a student, and after leaving col- 
lege she continued it, meeting with exceptional 
success. She gave one year of educational ser- 
vice in Iowa and five years at Red Lodge, Mont., 
and during this time she was for two years super- 
intendent of schools of Carbon county. From 
Red Lodge Mrs. Kearns came to Belt, Cascade 
county, where she was a valued teacher for one year 
and she was in the midst of her appreciated labors 
here when, in 1900, she was elected county super- 
intendent of schools of Cascade county on the 
Democratic ticket. For this position she is emi- 
nently qualified, not only from her high educa- 
tional standpoint, but also from her possession of 
those highly desirable elements of success, 
marked executive ability and definite experience. 
The important educational work of Cascade coun- 
ty is certain to be greatly advanced in her eflfective 
tenure of office. She is popular with the teach- 
ers, and has their hearty co-operation in her plans. 
In a fraternal way A^Irs. Kearns is identified at 
Belt with Methbette Circle of the Women of 
Woodcraft. On June 17, 1887, Miss Martha A. 
AIcAnelly was united in marriage at Fort Dodge, 
Iowa, to James Kearns, who was associated with 
her father in the coal business, and four months 
after their marriage Mr. Kearns was summoned 
to those activities that have no weariness. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



FLAVIUS J. KEENE.— Among the pioneer 
farmers and stockgrowers of Montana is Mr. 
Keene, an honored citizen of Broadwater county, 
where he has resided on one ranch for more than 
a third of a century. His birth occurred in 
Loudoun county, Va., in 1838. His father, Xew- 
ton Keene, and grandfather, John Keene, were ex- 
tensive planters in the Old Dominion. The 
mother of F. J. Keene was in girlhood Elizabeth 
Dulin, and she too was a Virginian, being the 
daughter of John Dulin, in recognition of whose 
services in the war of 1812 the government issued 
a warrant for 160 acres of land in Missouri. Mr. 
Keene removed to Missouri in 1859, and was en- 
gaged in farming in St. Charles county until the 
Civil war. On September 5, 1861, in response to 
Jackson's first call, he enlisted in the First Mis- 
souri (Confederate) \'olunteers for si.x months at 
Lexington. 

He duly received an honorable discharge, and 
did not re-enlist, because he was physically unable 
to pass the examination. He returned to Mis- 
souri, took the oath of allegiance in May, 1862, 
and resumed farming, which he continued about 
two years, disposing of his interests in Alarch, 
1865, 3nd soon afterward starting for Montana. 
He took the steamer for Atchison, Kans., the day 
after the assassination of President Lincoln, and 
from Atchison he came overland with a four- 
horse team, not being molested by the Indians, 
though trains ahead of and following his party 
had great trouble with the Indians. Passing 
through Virginia City, Mr. Keene went to the 
Missouri river and took up a homestead claim of 
160 acres, the nucleus of his present home, and 
here he has resided engaged in farming and stock- 
growing, being successful in his efforts and hav- 
ing made excellent improvements on his property, 
which is located ten miles from the village of 
Townsend. 

Mr. Keene is a strong supporter of the Demo- 
cratic, party and before the erection of Broadwater 
county served three years as a count}- commis- 
sioner of Meagher county. He held the office 
of school trustee for a number of years and at the 
present time he is stock commissioner of his 
county, this being liis second term of office. Fra- 
ternally he is a member of the Masonic order. 
On October 2, 1862, Mr. Keene married with 
Miss Harriet B. Davis, born in Virginia, on Sep- 
tember 21, 1841, the daughter of William and 
Elizabeth (Jett) Davis, likewise Virginians. The 



father was a miller, and operated a large flouring 
mill in Loudoun county, Va. His death oc- 
curred in 1849, ^^^ that of his widow in 1851. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keene have had eight children, 
Hattie died in Missouri; Thomas J. died in 1887; 
Mary Laura (wife of E. L. Lee, who has charge 
of the ranch and stock of Mr. Keene) is the mother 
of six children, Hattie, Annie Laura, Flavins O., 
Eugene L., Jr., Gertrude and Jesse W. : Emma 
May, wife of Joseph H. Lourie, a successful ranch- 
man on Sheep creek; Anna L., wife of Morris L. 
Duckett, who died, leaving one daughter, Lulu M. ; 
Elizabeth D. ; Alpha J., wife of Frank Ball, who has 
been for two years in charge of the public schools 
at Globe, Ariz, (they have one son, Howard T.), 
and Elva Mabel. 



BISHOP B. KELLEY, M. D., is a native of 
the old Buckeye state, having been born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1846, the son of John and Charity (Bee- 
son) Kelley, the former a native of Connecticut 
and the latter of Virginia. The paternal grand- 
father of the Doctor was John Kelley, who emi- 
grated from the Emerald Isle and located in Con- 
necticut, whence, after his marriage, he removed 
to eastern Ohio, becoming one of the pioneers of 
that state and for many years was engaged in the 
furniture business at New Lisbon. His son and 
namesake was reared and educated in Ohio, and 
made his home in Hancock county, where the 
Doctor was born, while his early business life 
was successfully devoted to contracting and 
building. His death occurred in 1870, and his 
widow died in 1895. They were the parents of 
six children, of whom five are now living. 

Bishop Kelley is indebted to the public schools 
of Nebraska for his education, his parents having 
removed to that state in 1857, locating in Doug- 
las county and there devoted his attention to 
farming and stockraising. The Doctor con- 
tinued his educational work in the high school at 
Columbus, Neb., and then began the work of pre- 
paring himself for the profession upon which he 
had fixed his choice. He matriculated in the cel- 
ebrated Rush Medical College, of Chicago, where 
he graduated as a member of the class of 1870, re- 
ceiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Soon 
after his graduation he located in Grand Island, 
Neb., where he was a successful practitioner for 
six years. The gold excitement in the Black 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Hills, however, proved sufficiently alluring to 
cause him to join the stampede to that section in 
1876, where he engaged for six years in the prac- 
tice of his profession, but also was interested in 
several unsuccessful mining enterprises. In 
1882 Dr. Kelley came to BilUngs, ^lont., and en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession until 1888, 
when he made another trip to the Black Hills, 
joined in various stampedes of gold-seekers and 
remained in that locality for four years, two 
of which he acted as physician and surgeon for 
the Cambria Coal Company, near New Castle. 
He then entered into contract practice for one 
year with the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad Company, in connection with the con- 
struction of the line from the Black Hills to 
Sheridan, W'yo., remaining in Sheridan about 
eighteen months. In 1894 the Doctor returned 
to BilHngs, resumed his practice and superin- 
tended operations on a farm he had purchased 
near the city, but in 1897 he came to Red Lodge, 
where he now controls a representative practice. 
In politics Dr. Kelley gives his support to the 
Republican party. While a resident of Yellow- 
stone county he served for a number of years as 
coroner ; was elected to the same office in Carbon 
county in 1898 and chosen as his own successor 
in 1900, being coroner at the present time. In 
1899 he was appointed county physician. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the time-honored or- 
der of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. On 
December 14, 1888, Dr. Kelley was united in mar- 
riage to Mrs. Elizabeth M. Burt, who was born 
in Manchester, England, the daughter of John 
Davis. (Jne son was born to her first marriage — 
Charles J- Burt, now engaged in mining at Austin, 
twelve miles west of Helena. The Doctor and 
Mrs. Kcllev have no children. 



CJ. KEXCK, one of the leading ranchmen and 
stockdealers of Broadwater county, was born 
in Baden, Germany, on October i, 1858, and came 
with his parents to the United States when he was 
thirteen. He was the son of George J- and Mar- 
telaine (Herd) Kenck, both natives of Baden, which 
had been the family home for generations. The 
family immigrated to this country, landing on ]\Iay 
I, 1872, and came immediately to Montana, locating 
in Beaver Creek \allcy, and on the ranch now oc- 
cupied by C. J. Kenck. In the family there were 



two sons and three daughters. In January, 1893, 
the father and mother removed to San Diego 
county, Cal. Mr. Kenck continuing on the ranch, 
purchased 160 acres of land from Isaac Hall, pre- 
empted 160 acres, and under the timber culture 
law acquired another quarter section. He then 
bought 160 acres of his father and also the Tony 
ranch. This increased his landed estate to 800 acres, 
Here he has engaged profitably in stockraising 
and general farming, usually wintering between 
1 50 and 200 head of cattle. On November 20, 1890, 
Mr. Kenck was married to Miss Tracey Leophold, 
daughter of George Leophold, of Baden, Germany. 
The ceremony was performed in the United States. 
For seventeen years Mr. Kenck has been clerk of 
the school district in which he resides, a position 
he has capably and creditably filled. Fraternally 
he is a member of the L^nited Workmen and the 
Odd Fellows, of which he is treasurer of Lodge 
No. 18, of Winston. Mr. Kenck is highly esteemed 
in the community in which he resides, and is a man 
of sound business judgment, safe and conserva- 
tive in his views. His financial and social success 
are due to sterling qualities of head and heart, and 
he is enterprising, broad-minded and progressive. 



WILLIAM J. KENNEDY, one of the enterpris- 
ing business men of Great Falls, was born 
near Oquawka, III, on January 28, 1863. He is the 
son of Stephen and Sarah (Marble) Kennedy, both 
natives of Kno.x county, Ohio. The father was 
born in 1841 and came to Illinois when he was 
twenty and settled at Rosetta, where he was 
engaged in the hardware and agricultural 
implement business until his death in Jul}-, 
1897. The mother was born in 1844 and is now 
residing at Beh, Mont. There were three brothers 
and two sisters. Two of the sons, Walter and 
Benjamin, are at Belt. The former is manager 
and one of the proprietors of the Belt Hardware 
Company. Benjamin Kennedy is associated with 
the Belt Coal Company. Both the paternal and 
maternal grandfathers were born in Ohio, where 
the first died. The other came to Rosetta, 111., 
in 1864, and is also deceased. 

The early days of William J. Kennedy were 
passed in Oquawka, 111., and here he was educated 
in the public schools. At the age of nineteen 
vears, in 1881. he left his native town for the 
far west. After he arrived at Fort Benton in 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



the same year, he located there and remained 
four years engaged in the meat business. In the 
spring of 1885 he came to Great Falls. Here he 
was engaged with the AIurphy-McClay Company, 
in the hardware business for three years. In 
1888 he succeeded Dodd & Kennedy, butchers, 
which he merged in 1890 with the Great Falls 
Meat Company, and remained with the company 
until 1895. In 1896 Mr. Kennedy established 
the Cascade Soap Company for the manufacture 
and wholesaling of soap, and this and the one 
at Helena are the only two in the state. The 
company is doing a most profitable business and 
the outlook for the future is prosperous. In 
1892, at Anoka. Minn., Mr. Kennedy was mar- 
ried to Miss Winnifred Goss, of that place. They 
have a bright little daughter, Ruth. Mr. Ken- 
nedy is a Democrat, although he manifests no 
active part in political manipulations. In local 
affairs he invariably takes the position of a pa- 
triotic citizen who has at heart the municipal 
welfare of the community in which he resides. 
He is not connected with anv secret societv. 



AVILLIAM F. KESTER, who is prominently 
VV identified with one of the leading industrial 
enterprises in the state, as vice-president of the 
Montana Implement Company, of Great Falls, 
is one of the progressive young business men 
of the city, and he has here attained a notable 
success. He comes of German stock, although 
he was born in Preble county, Ohio, on Decem- 
ber 8, 1865. His father, Henry Kester, came 
to America from Germany when a young man, 
locating at Eaton, Ohio, where he followed the 
cooper's trade, but from 1872 until 1884 he was 
manufacturing carriages in that place, where his 
death occurred in 1889 at the age of sixty years. 
He married Wilhelmina Kester. who was born 
in Germany, who came to the United States in 
early womanhood, their marriage being solemnized 
soon after her arrrival. She still maintains her 
home in Eaton, Ohio. 

William F. Kester attended the- public and the 
high schools of Eaton until he was sixteen years 
of age, when he engaged in farm work for two 
years, after which he served an apprenticeship 
of three years at the trade of carriagesmith in 
his father's shops, becoming a skilled workman. 
In the spring of 1886 Mr. Kester came to Hel- 



ena, Mont., and entered the employ of the Weisen- 
horn Carriage Company, for whom he worked 
until the winter of 1889, when he returned to 
Eaton, Ohio, to settle his father's estate, remaining 
there about eighteen months, after which he re- 
sumed his position with the Weisenhorn Com- 
pany, with whom he continued until 1892. In 
the fall of that year he came to Great Falls, and 
was one of the four partners who established 
the Great Falls Carriage Works. In the spring 
of 1898 this firm was consolidated with the J. 
H. McKnight Company, and the enterprise incor- 
porated as the Montana Implement Company. 

Mr. Kester is the vice-president and general 
manager of the company, the president being T. 
L. Martin, of Helena. Under Mr. Kester's effec- 
tive and discriminating direction the company has 
advanced to a foremost position among the 
industries of like nature in the state, and 
its affairs have been signally prospered. Air. 
Kester exercises his right of franchise in 
the various elections, but takes no active 
part in politics. Fraternally he is identified with 
Queen City Lodge No. 42, I. O. O. F.,.at Hel- 
ena, and the encampment at Great Falls, while 
he is also connected with Kenbrae Castle No. 201, 
R. H., at Great Falls. On December 8, 1896, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Kester and Miss 
Estella Wantz, of Midcanon, Cascade county, she 
being a daughter of James W'antz, an extensive 
and influential stockraiser of that place. 



T OSEPH KIRSCHER, one of the leading ranch- 
J men of Broadwater county, in the Alissouri 
valley, near Townsend, is an early pioneer, and. 
in 1864, while coming on the long westward jour- 
ney he found it necessary to fight hostile Indians 
who disputed his advance. He was born in Erie. 
Erie county, Pa., on Alay 3, 1840, the son of 
Peter Kirscher, a scion of an old French family, 
his ancestors coming from France about iSoo. 
Peter Kirscher with his wife and twelve children 
settled in Polk county, Iowa, in the sjjring of 
1853. Here they developed a fine estate and 
the old farm has since been regarded as the family 
homestead. On May 10, 1864, Joseph Kirscher 
left Iowa for Montana with his Ijrother l\'ter 
and his brother-in-law, William Aliehle and wile. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



103 



wagon, provisions and the customary outfitting for 
the settlement of a pioneer state. Other parties 
joined them on the way for company and for 
protection against the Indians. One of the party, 
a man of wide experience in a plainsman's work, 
was chosen as captain of the expedition and when 
the company had attained a sufficient size the 
journey was commenced in military fashion. 

Although Indians were frequently seen it was 
some time before they gave material trouble. The 
party did not travel on Sunday, and on Sun- 
day morning they found that quite a number of 
their horses had been stampeded. A number of 
men started in search of them, continuing the 
search all the morning. Shortly after eating din- 
ner an alarm was raised that Indians were making 
a raid on their stock. The Indians were driven off 
but not until they had speared a number of cattle. 
Retiring to a high hill the Indians watched the 
men who had gone in search of the stolen 
horses until they saw that their help was 
needed by their companions and went to their aid. 
After a number of shots were exchanged, the In- 
dians retreated. One Indian at least was killed, 
but none of the whites were injured. Sentinels 
were thereafter stationed and no more trouble 
was given. 

Mr. Kirscher's first location in Montana was at 
Virginia City. In the spring of 1865 he went to 
Last Chance gulch, and from the spring of 1866 
he prospected with poor success for some eighteen 
months. Having a brother on Missouri creek Mr. 
Kirscher visited him through the winter of 1867 
and spring of 1868, and the summer of 1868 he 
passed in ranching with his brother-in-law on 
Beaver creek. In 1868 his brother sold out and 
they engaged in freighting. Relinquishing this 
enterprise in the fall of 1869. the next spring he 
and his brothers Peter, Jacob and Anthony, lo- 
cated a ranch and worked it in partnership until 
the fall of 1873 when Joseph and Peter bought 
their brothers" interests and conducted the ranch 
imtil 1883, Peter then going to the Deep creek 
ranch, leaving Joseph sole proprietor. Here he 
remained in prosperous circumstances and in 1888 
he added to his estate by purchasing the valuable 
Daugett ranch, on which he has since resided, 
and working both ranches with excellent success. 
In 1883 Mr. Kirscher married Miss Mary Hoist, a 
native of Denmark. She came to America in 1881, 
making the voyage without escort. They have 
t\vo sons. Louis Maron and ^Villiam Gu^■. 



O TEPHEN H. KNOWLES, one of the prosper- 
O ous ranchmen and enterprising business men 
of Boulder valley, Jefferson county, came to Mon- 
tana in 1883. He was born at Augusta, Me., on 
November 3, 1854, and comes of an old Colonial 
family, his ancestors on both sides serving in the 
Revolution. He is the son of John and Sarah 
Ann (Wade) Knowles, the former of whom was 
born at Redfield, Me., on May 6, 181 6. On May 
6, 1844, he was married to Sarah Ann Wade, who 
was born at Augusta, Me., on August 28, 1825. 
The father died August 12, 1899, while the mother 
is still living. The paternal grandfather, John 
Knowles, was born in New Hampshire in 1782. 
He married Miss Betsey Powell and died in Bath, 
Me. The great-grandfather, Jonathan Knowles, 
took an active part in the war of the Revolution. 
He was a tailor and when not on duty against 
the British troops he was engaged in making 
clothes for the officers of the Continental army. 
He married Miss Mollie Prescott, the daughter 
of Jeremiah and Mary (Sanborn) Prescott, and 
a scion of a very distinguished family. Her father 
was also quite prominent in the Revolution. He 
was the son of Samuel Prescott, the'son of James 
and Mary (Bantler) Prescott, and James was a 
son of a James Prescott, the English emigrant, 
who was one of the early British colonists in Amer- 
ica. The paternal great-great-grandfather, John 
Knowles, was a soldier in the Revolution, and 
was under Gen. Stark at Bennington and else- 
where. He died in the service. The mother of 
S. H. Knowles, Sarah Ann (Wade) Knowles, was 
the daughter of James Wade, and born at Augusta, 
Me., on January 2, 1792. Her father served in the 
war of 1812, married Keziah Blunt, a daughter 
of Andrew Blunt, who was also a Revolutionary 
soldier, and wounded at Castine, Hancock county, 
Me. His ancestors are traced back to Normandy, 
France. The father of James Wade was Benjamin 
Wade, also a heroic soldier of the Revolution. 
He removed from New Hampshire to Augusta, 
where he married Rachel Pettingill, a native of 
England. 

The early education of S. H. Ivnowles was re- 
ceived in the public schools of his native city 
and later he attended the Maine ^^'esleyan Semi- 
nary. Subsequently he studied medicine under Dr. 
George E. Brickett, at Augusta, Me. He then en- 
tered Bowdoin College, at Brunswick, in that 
state, for the purpose of studying medicine, but 
owing to failing eyesight he was obliged after a 



II04 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



time to relinquish his design. While attending 
school and reading medicine he taught in the 
public schools of Kennebec county at intervals. 
In 1883 he came to Boulder, Mont., and for a 
number of years followed mining. He then en- 
gaged in ranching two miles from the town. In 
1896 he settled in Boulder and in connection with 
his ranching operations engaged in mercantile 
business, conducting it successfully for four years. 
At the end of that time he gave up merchandis- 
ing and has since devoted his attention to raising 
cattle and horses. He now owns and operates a 
ranch of 1,000 acres in the Boulder valley and has 
on it regularly from 300 to 700 head of cattle and 
horses. Mr. Knowles was married on Septem- 
ber 13, 1882, to Miss Viola ]\I. Adell, daughter 
of Cornelius and Mary (Dudley) Adell. both na- 
tives of Maine. The great-grandfather on Mrs. 
Knowles' paternal side was a German who settled 
in Maine in the early part of the eighteenth cen- 
tury, having then a wife and a few children, 
the most of his offspring being born in this coun- 
try. They all lived and died in Maine. On her ma- 
ternal side all of her forefathers were of Scotch 
and English ancestry, and took an active part 
in our Revolutionary war. Mrs. Knowles was a 
teacher, teaching in the public schools of her na- 
tive state and for five years after coming to 
Montana. To her and her husband two children 
have been born, one of w'hom died in infancy. The 
other one is Stephen H., Jr., who was born on 
?.ray 21, 1899. In politics Mr. Knowles is a Re- 
publican, and fraternally a member of Boulder 
Lodge No. 41, A. F. & A. M. He has been 
eminently successful in all his business under- 
takings and is highly respected by all who have 
the pleasure of his acquaintance. 



HOX. WILLIAM A. CLARK, ITnited States 
Senator from Montana, is a resident of Butte. 
He was born on January 8, 1839, near Connells- 
ville, Fayette county. Pa. It would be impossible 
to write the history of the progressive men of 
Montana without ilirect allusion to William A. 
Clark, l-'or of all the brave men who have dared 
the. perils of the plains and fought stej) by step 
fur luastery and control of the territory against 
the alert and hostile savages, and then turned froiu 
the sanguinary battlefield to the pleasanter ])aths 
of peace and conunercial industry, gaining re- 



wards in wealth and honors that royalty might 
envy, none has been more conspicuous in sunlight 
or shadow, peace or war, panic or prosperity than 
Senator William A. Clark, the son of John and 
Mary (Andrews) Clark, natives of Pennsylvania. 
The paternal grandfather was John Clark, a native 
of County Tyrone, Ireland, who settled in Penn- 
sylvania soon after the Revolution. He was 
united in marriage to a Miss Reed, of Chester 
county, Pa., whose parents were also of the north 
of Ireland. The maternal grandfather of Sena- 
tor Clark was Williain Andrews, who married 
Sarah Kithcart, of County Tyrone, Ireland, and 
came to the Quaker state in the early days of 
the nineteenth century. • The ancestors name was 
originally spelled Cithcart, which through an er- 
ror of a parish clerk was changed to Kithcart. 
The Cithcart family, an ancient Htiguenot one, 
went from France to Scotland and later moved to 
the north of Ireland, from whence a later genera- 
tion came to America and settled in New York 
and Pennsylvania. The parents of William A. 
Clark were reared, educated and married in Penn- 
sylvania, where they resided until 1856, when thc\' 
removed to Van Buren county, Iowa, where John 
Clark, the father, died in 1873, aged seventy-six 
years. He was a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and for forty years was an elder in that 
denomination. 

The boyhood of Senator Clark was passed on 
his father's farm, where he secured the benefits 
of tlirec months schooling in winter, and during 
the summer was at home giving diligent atten- 
tion to whatever his hands could find to do. He 
was an energetic, self-reliant boy, and at the age 
of fourteen he entered Laurel Hill academy, and 
lliere laid the foundation of an excellent English 
education, which was suppleniented by a term at 
the academy at Birmingham, while afterwards he 
matriculated in the law department of the I'ni- 
vtrsity at Mount Pleasant, Iowa. For two years 
he prosecuted his legal studies and, although he 
did not become a disciple of lilackstone, it is cer- 
tain that the knowledge and mental discipline 
he gained by the study of law has been of ini- 
mense benefit to him. That he would have de- 
\eloped into an al)le and successful attorney is 
without question ; and instead of individually ex- 
ploiting the vast enterprises with which his name 
is now associated, he might have been now re- 
ceiving retainers from similar gigantic corpora- 
tions. In iS59-()0 he taught school in Missouri. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 105 



and then went to South Park, Colo., driving a 
team across the plains in 1862. His first min- 
ing experience was at Central City, Colo., and the 
knowledge and practical experience there gained 
was of great value to him in his future operations 
in Montana and in the rich ore-producing country 
bounded by British Columbia and Mexico. 
Among the first in Colorado to learn the news 
of the discovery of gold at Bannack, Mont., in 
1863, was Mr. Clark. He started for that place 
at once, arriving at Bannack to find the population 
stampeding for Horse Prairie. This stampede 
he joined and there secured a claim which he 
worked for two seasons, cleaning up $1,500 the 
first summer. This was the foundation upon 
which Senator Clark has built up the vast for- 
tune he now controls. 

The ensuing five years of his life while not 
uneventful were prosperous. Each year saw some- 
thing added to his rising fortune. Bold in his 
plans and energetic in their execution, he took 
no backward steps. He early perceived that the 
advantages offered for trade and business were 
more lucrative than life in the placer mines. These 
advantages he seized upon, and within half a dec- 
ade was at the head Of one of the largest whole- 
sale mercantile establishments of the territory. 
The $1,500 had increased in a manifold ratio. 
In the winter of 1863-4 he imported a load of 
provisions from Salt Lake City. Upon these 
the profit was immense and the experiment was 
repeated the following winter, his market then 
being Virginia City. His eye comprehended the 
demands of every locality and under every pos- 
sible condition. Tobacco was a scarce article 
in the mining camps. Mr. Clark started on horse- 
back for Boise City, Idaho, purchased several 
thousand pounds at a cost of $1.50 a pound which 
he sold for $5.00 and $6.00 a pound at Last Chance 
gulch. In 1866 he established a store at Elk creek, 
which was profitably conducted. Disposing of his 
interest in this establishment in the fall, he made 
a horseback trip to the Pacific coast and brought 
back another stock of goods, carefully selected 
for the purchasing miners. In October of the 
same year Mr. Clark went east by the Mack- 
inaw route, visited the principal cities of the east 
and south, familiarized himself with their local 
conditions, topography and geography, and re- 
turned to Montana the following year. Be- 
tween Missoula and Walla Walla there was then 
a star route mail line of 400 miles. Mr. Clark 



secured the contract for carrying the mail over 
this route and made such a success of the un- 
dertaking as to bring him into local prominence. 
In 1868 Mr. Clark went to New York and formed 
a partnership with Mr. R. W. Donnell for the 
purpose of engaging in the wholesale mercantile 
and banking business in the territory of Mon- 
tana. The result was one of the strongest business 
firms of the northwest. In 1869 they shipped in 
an immense stock of goods and opened them for 
sale in Helena. Stibsequently the business was 
transferred to Deer Lodge, and consolidated with 
that of Mr. Donnell. Mr. S. E. Larabie was 
then admitted as a partner; forming the firm of 
Donnell, Clark & Larabie, which conducted a 
most successful business. When they retired from 
merchandisirig the members of the firm directed 
their attention to banking, first at Deer Lodge 
and then at Butte. In May, 1884, Messrs. Clark 
and Larabie purchased the interest of Mr. Don- 
nell in their Montana business, and subsequently 
Mr. Clark and his brother, James Ross Clark, 
came into full ownership of the Butte bank, and 
the banking house of W. A. Clark Sf Brother at 
Butte is one of the strongest in the west. 

No other individual has played so conspicuous 
a part in the operation of vast mills and smelters 
for the profitable treatment of ores, and nothing 
has contributed more to the development and 
prosperity of the Treasure state than these large 
industries. The quartz prospects in the neighbor- 
hood of Butte first received the attention of Mr. 
Qark. In 1872 he purchased the Original, Colusa, 
Mountain Chief, Gambetta and others. Nearly all 
of these mines proved to be of immense richness. 
A marked characteristic in the career of Senator 
Clark is that he never enters upon a project un- 
supported by the fullest information. This strong 
trait in his character he exhibited in his early 
mining operations, for the winter of 1872-3 he 
passed at the Columbia College School of Mines, 
taking a course in practical assaying and analysis, 
with a general outline of mineralogy. The knowl- 
edge here gained has served him well in his min- 
ing, milling and smelting operations. By means 
of the financial aid furnished by Mr. Clark, the 
first stamp mill of Butte, "Old Dexter," was 
completed in 1876. He organized the company 
that erected the first smelter in that city, the Colo- 
rado and Montana Smelting Company, still one 
of the leading enterprises of the Copper city. The 
Moulton Mining Company followed, organized in 



io6 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



]S8o; then the erection of the mill and the devel- 
opment of the mine. iVt a cost of half a million 
dollars a complete dry-crushing and chloridizing 
forty-stamp-mill was built; a three-compartment 
shaft 800 feet was sunk and a modern pumping 
and hoisting works provided and the property 
thoroughly exploited. Ever since this mine has 
been in successful operation, and even through 
the dark days of panic and depression, the 
stamps of the old Moulton never ceased to 
drop until the great drop in. the value of silver 
occurred. Of this historic company William 
A. Clark is the president, and his brother, 
Joseph K. Clark, the manager. Senator Clark 
and his son, Chas. Walker Clark, own the 
Butte reduction works and the Colusa- Parrott 
Mining & Smelting Company and several 
other copper and silver mines in connection with 
the Butte district. Mr. Clark has large individual 
holdings in other mines in Butte, many of which 
are in successful operation, affording employment 
to a large number of men. Perhaps the most valu- 
able of his present holdings are in Arizona. He 
is practically the sole owner of the United Verde 
Copper Company's property in Arizona, one of 
the wonders of the mining world. This mine is 
supplemented by immense modern smelting and re- 
tining plants, electric and water plants, and the out- 
]nit of copper is only limited by the world's de- 
mand. The United \'erde & Pacific Railway, con- 
necting this mine with the Santa Fe system, is a 
marvel of engineering skill, and for its length, 
twenty-six miles, is one of the most expensive in 
the west. 

Mr. Clark now holds monetary and industrial 
interests across the entire continent from the Pa- 
cific to the Bay of Fundy, and he has large min- 
ing interests, in addition to those already men- 
tioned, in Montana, Utah, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona, 
Xew Mexico and Maine. They comprise gold, 
copper, silver, lead and coal mines, and a large 
.sione quarry at North Jay, Me. He owns and 
controls a numl)cr of newspapers in Montana and 
Utah, including the "Butte Miner," one of the 
largest and best equipped newspapers of the north- 
west ; the Great Falls Tribune, of Great Falls, 
.Mont., and the Salt Lake Herald, of Salt Lake 
Citv, and interests in many other journals and 
periodicals. In California he has an immense 
>ugar i)lantation and one of the largest factories 
in the west, conducted under the name of the 
l.cis Alamitos Sugar Company. At Elizabethport, 



N. J., he has an immense plant, the W. A. Clark 
Wire Works, one of the largest manufacturing 
plants of its kind in the United States. In New 
York he owns and operates the Henry Bonnard 
Bronze Company, which is probably the largest 
bronze house in the United States. He owns large 
real estate interests in Montana, New York and 
the District of Columbia. In New York he is 
building a handsome residence on Fifth Avenue, 
which will probably be equal to any building in 
America, and which will contain one of the largest 
private art galleries in the world. This mansion 
will be completed and ready for occupancy about 
1904. His latest business venture is the con- 
struction of a railroad from San Pedro Harbor 
on the Pacific coast via Los Angeles to Salt 
Lake City, known as the San Pedro, Los Angeles 
& Salt Lake Railroad, a goodly portion of which 
ib already constructed, and it will be fully oper- 
ated within the next two years. The length of this 
road and branches will aggregate about 1,100 
miles. He also owns almost numberless amounts 
of stocks, bonds and securities of many of the 
large eastern railroads and other financial enter- 
prises. In the municipal improvements of Butte 
Senator Clark has always manifested the liveliest 
interest, for he is public-spirited to the highest 
degree. The first water system and the first elec- 
tric lighting plant of Butte were established by 
him. He is the principal owner and president 
of the electric railways of Butte, and is other- 
wise largely interested in local and state indus- 
trial enterprises. 

But the business side of Senator Clark's char- 
acter, remarkable as it is, does not show the full 
measure of the man. There is no one in the state 
with a higher, broader sense of public duty. While 
one of the busiest men, with his hand always on 
the helm and in touch with the details of his vast 
enterprises, he still finds time to respond to every 
call of public duty, either of his party, his home 
city, or his state or country. The services he has 
rendered each may be called invaluable. Through- 
out his life, by intense application, study 
and careful observation he has prepared himself 
to fulfill the highest functions of citizenship and his 
services are fully appreciated. Gov. Potts ap- 
pointed Mr. Clark state orator to represent Mon- 
tana at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition, 
and the brilliant oration that he there delivered 
did much to attract attention to the resources of 
the territory. In 1877 he was elected grand mas- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



:io7 



ter of the Masonic grand lodge of Montana. lie 
was among the first to respond to the call of Gov. 
Potts for troops to repel the Nez Perces invasion 
of 1877. Receiving the commission of major, 
he led the Butte battalion to the front against 
that wiliest of Indian warriors, Chief Joseph. To 
the first constitutional convention, 1884, he was 
elected a delegate from Silver Bow county, was 
made its president and there won laurels as a pre- 
siding officer and master of parliamentary 
law. To the World's Industrial and Cotton Ex- 
position at New Orleans President Arthur ap- 
pointed Mr. Clark as one of the commissioners, 
and there he passed several months, devoting his 
time exclusively to furthering the interests of 
Montana. 

Senator Clark is a Democrat. In 1888 he re- 
ceived the nomination of that party for delegate 
t(j congress, made a most brilliant canvass, but 
was defeated by treachery within the party lines. 
At the time of the second constitutional conven- 
tion in 1889, when the state was admitted into 
the Union, Mr. Clark was elected a member of that 
body, and as its president rendered effective ser- 
vice of an entirely non-partisan character. To 
Mr. Clark's senatorial aspirations national inter- 
est attaches. Upon the first legislative assembly, 
convened in Helena in January, 1890, devolved 
the duty of selecting two United States senators. 
Political misunderstanding resulted in the elec- 
tion of two sets of senators, following the or- 
ganization of two houses of representatives. The 
Democrats elected William A. Clark and Martin 
Macginnis, the Republicans W. F. Sanders and 
T. C. Power. Mr. Clark received the unanimous 
vote of his party in caucus and in the joint session. 
All four presented their claims to the United 
States senate, but that body recognized Messrs. 
Sanders and Powers to be elected as the Montana 
members of their body. But it is a matter of 
record that Mr. Clark then received from his 
party in the state the highest honor in its gift, 
and he is as proud of it to this day as if he had 
enjoyed the full honors of what he regards as a 
just and legal election. In 1893 occurred Mr. 
Clark's second contest for the senatorship. The 
legislature convened in Helena to elect a successor 
to Col. Sanders. The three Populist members 
held the balance of i)ower. Again the caucus 
nomination was given to Mr. Clark, but a contin- 
gent of Democrats refused to either participate in 
the caucus or abide In- it. During the entire ses- 



sion of sixty days the contest was protracted, 
and at the last joint session the gavel fell with 
no election. During several ballots Mr. Clark 
came within two votes of an election, on the 
last ballot receiving the support of one Populist 
and several Republicans in addition to the twenty- 
six Democrats who stood faithful. In 1892 Mr. 
Clark headed the delegation to the Democratic 
National convention at Chicago. During the 
legislative session of 1898 Mr. Clark was again 
a candidate for the senate and was again elected. 
On his application for permission to take his seat 
partisan politics again intervened, and at the re- 
quest of the Republican majority in the senate the 
question was held in abeyance. Meanwhile Mr. 
Clark resigned his senatorship and was thereupon 
appointed by Lieut. Gov. Spriggs to fill the va- 
cancy, but never presented himself to take the 
oath of office. This term, however, could con- 
tinue only until the next meeting of the legis- 
lature in 1 901, when for the third time he was 
elected to the position he had so honorably sought. 
Thus Senator Clark has been highly honored by 
his party in Montana. But no man has more justly 
deserved such recognition. Amid the cares and 
complexities of business his ear has ever been at- 
tentive to the calls of duty. 

While he has been faithful to his party, he has 
been no less so to his friends. The city of Hel- 
ena is indebted to him for the location of the 
state capital at that city. In 1894 the permanent 
seat of the state government was to be estab- 
lished. There had been a contest for the location 
of the capital in 1892 which had resulted in leav- 
ing Helena and Anaconda as the sole contest- 
ants. Temporarily Helena was the capital city, 
but the choice of the powerful Anaconda Com- 
pany was Anaconda, and everything looked favor- 
able to the location of the capital at that city. 
The Helena people were without leadership and 
their forces without organization. In this con- 
nection it should not be forgotten that the resi- 
dence of Senator Clark was in sight of the Ana- 
conda mines, and there were large inducements 
for him to throw his influence in favor of Ana- 
conda. But the situation appealed strongly to 
his love of justice. He cast aside personal and 
political ambition and threw the weight of his 
influence in favor of Helena. Through the col- 
unms of the Butte Miner he made his position 
known, and from that day he was the recognized 
leader of the Helena forces. He eloquently urged 



io8 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



her claims upon the stump. He contributed liber- 
ally to the campaign fund, becoming the invinci- 
ble chartipion of Helena in the fray. The cam- 
paign was one of the most exciting ever wit- 
nessed in the state and when the victory was 
won for Helena a spontaneous and wild ovation 
was tendered to the man whose successful efforts 
had made the victory possible. By thousands the 
people gathered at Helena to do him honor. They 
bore him on their shoulders, then placed him in 
a carriage, and, detaching the horses, the surging 
populace drew him in triumph from the railway 
station to the city on which he had conferred 
so great a benefit. From that eventful local strug- 
gle it may safely be said that William A. Clark 
has easily ranked as the first citizen of Montana 
and as one of the commanding figures of the west. 
In March, 1869, Senator Clark was united in 
marriage with Miss Kate L. Stauffer, a highly ac- 
complished lady of Connellsville, Pa. The couple 
left on their wedding day for their future home 
in the Rocky mountains. Their first location was 
at Helena, and there their fir.st child, Mary C, 
was born in" January, 1870. In Deer Lodge, to 
which place they had removed, their other chil- 
dren were born, with the exception of their young- 
est child, Francis Paul, who was born in Paris. 
They had six children, one of whom, Jessie (twin 
sister of Katherine L., now living), died in Deer 
Lodge in April, 1888, aged three years. The 
eldest, Mary C, was happily married in April, 
1891, to Dr. E. M. Culver, a successful physician 
of New York city. In that great metropolis Mrs. 
Culver is mistress of a beautiful home, where 
she dispenses a generous hospitality. Their eldest 
son, Charles Walker, is a graduate of Yale Col- 
lege. To the regular academic course he has sup- 
plemented a degree in mineralogy, thus fitting 
liimself for a successful career in the mining world. 
He married Miss Katherine Roberts, of Helena, 
Mont., and resides in Butte, where he has erected 
a magnificent home. Katherine L. was married 
to Dr. Lewis R. Morris, an able physician of 
New York city, in Alay, 1900. William A.,. Jr., 
a graduate of the University of Virginia, and now 
a resident of Butte, is engaged in legal practice. 
He was married to Miss Mabel Foster, of Butte, 
in June, 1901. Francis Paul, the youngest of the 
family, while attending a preparatory school at 
Andover, Mass,, was taken with erysipelas and 
died after a few days illness. The broadening 
influence of foreign travel Senator Clark has freely 



accorded his family. They resided in Paris for 
three years, acquired a thorough knowledge of the 
French language, and passed two years in Dres- 
den, Germany, where they acquired a knowledge 
of German. During these years Senator Clark 
spent his winters in Europe, and with his family 
traveled extensively through Europe and portions 
of Asia and Africa. Aside from their beautiful 
home in Europe, the family has maintained a resi- 
dence in New York city, where a portion of each 
\ear is passed. But the happiest home canot 
bar the way to the visitation of death. On Octo- 
ber 19, 1893, Mr. Clark met with the greatest 
loss of his life in the death of his wife, which oc- 
curred at the family residence in New York, fol- 
lowing a brief illness. A fitting helpmate was she 
to her active and ambitious husband ; of rare intel- 
ligence and refinement, her death was sincerely 
mourned by many Montana friends. 

Senator Clark is still making history. Although 
the rounding out of his high personal character is 
complete, he is evidently destined to play no un- 
important part in national affairs. That he is 
entitled to a place in the first rank of the brave, 
determined and energetic men of the great west 
will be readily admitted. As a good citizen, patri- 
otic and broad-minded. Senator Clark numbers 
thousands of warm personal friends in all parties 
and of all creeds. With many of them he has 
mingled as a pioneer and shared the hardships 
and the pleasures of early territorial days. To 
many he has given a helping hand and a cheering 
word of encouragement, and often liberal assist- 
ance. And today Senator Clark is proud of his 
state, proud of her manly, loyal men, of his home 
city, and the sturdy Montanians with whom he has 
for so many years worked hand in hand in the 
building of the commonwealth. At the openini^ 
of the state campaign in 1900 it was at once seen 
tJiat Mr. Clark was the principal political issue. 
Certain heavy and well known corporations threw 
large sums of money into the state ostensibly for 
the defeat of the Democratic state ticket, but really 
in antagonism to Mr. Clark's senatorial aspira- 
tions. Newspapers were established and others 
purchased, enlarged and improved. In the equip- 
ping of these expensive plants and for their edi- 
torial conduction immense sums were expended 
while an extensive art plant was established and 
conducted in Butte apparently for the sole pur- 
]jose of supplying political caricature directed 
against him. His personality was the target for 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 109 



every possible force of his antagonists, but then 
the result of the election was a sweeping Demo- 
cratic victory, a most flattering vindication of 
Mr. Clark in connection with the action of the 
United States senate following his election to 
that body in 1898. The election of Mr. Clark 
was practically settled on the night of November 
6, 1900, when the votes were counted through- 
out the state. On January 7, 1901, the Mon- 
tana legislature assembled. Until the isth, at 
which time the first formal ballot was taken, each 
house voting separately, the senatorial question 
was the absorbing topic. On January 15th, at 
noon, the first ballot was taken. The result showed 
a clear majority of two for Senator Clark after 
the distribution of a number of complimentary 
ballots to other parties. The legislature then ad- 
journed. On the next ballot, at noon, January 
1 6th, Senator Clark received the solid vote of 
his party, fifty-seven to thirty-six, in both houses 
for the long term (being seven more than were 
necessary for election), to succeed Senator Thomas 
H. Carter. This was as complete a vindication as 
was ever accorded anywhere to any man, and a 
vindication of which Senator Clark is very proud. 
He entered upon his official duties as a national 
senator March 4, 1901, and, by his democratic 
and affable manner and his familiarity with state 
and national issues, and his ability as an orator, 
he has added to his already enviable position as 
one of the national leaders of the Democratic 
party. Mr. Clark is still in the prime of Hfe, 
enjoys excellent health and has, no doubt, many 
years of usefulness and happiness in store for him. 



PHILIP W. KORELL, a progressive ranchman 
of Fergus county, owner of the ranch which 
always produces the largest crop of alfalfa hay 
in the county, and to the cultivation of which he 
applies both brain and brawn in good measure, 
is a native of King's county, on Long Island, 
in the state of New York, where he was born May 
28, 1857. His parents were Jacob and Catharine 
Korell, the former a native of Berlin, Germany, 
and the latter of Lorraine, a part of France when 
she was born, but now belonging to Germany. 
Her father was a soldier in Napoleon's army, and 
followed that great commander through many 
hard campaigns. He saw the eagles of the empire 
soar in triumph at Austerlitz and Wagram and 



Borodino, cower in fear on the terrible retreat 
from Moscow, and go down in shame and ever- 
lasting defeat at Leipsic and the crowning disaster 
at Waterloo. 

Mr. Korell's parents emigrated to America in 
their early life and located in New York, where 
the father rose to comfortable circumstances as a 
baker. He died in 1900, leaving four children, 
of whom Philip is the oldest. He received a good 
education in the public schools of his native place 
and at Albany high school, where he was gradu- 
ated after a thorough course of instruction. He 
then studied law for two years under the direc- 
tion of A. B. Pratt, Esq., of Albany. At the age 
of seventeen he took charge of the books of the 
firm of Sanford & Pratt, of Albany, and remained 
in their employ four years. In 1877 he came to 
Fort Benton on the steamer Rosebud. He was 
employed as cook on boats on the Missouri river 
for three years and then in 1880 located at his pres- 
ent home, a mile and a half southwest of Utica. 
The ranch comprises 1,160 acres, about 150 of 
which are in a high state of cultivation and pro- 
duce abundantly whatever is committed to their 
fruitfulness. All kinds of live stock range freely 
over its wide expanse, but sheep are the staple 
product. These are. raised in great numbers and 
of superior quality, both their flesh and fleece hav- 
ing a high rank in the markets. 

Mr. Korell was married December 13, 1881, 
to Miss Anna M. Blair, only child of Gen. and 
DoUie Blair, of Kentucky. Her father, a general 
in the Confederate army, was killed in one of the 
terrible battles of the Civil war. Her mother died 
in August, 1899. To Mr. and Mrs. Korell were 
born four children — Katharine, Louisa, Carl and 
Breathitt. All are living, but their mother died 
November 10, 1896. 

In politics Mr. Korell is an ardent Republican ; 
and in fraternal relations he is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



pHRISTOPHER KUKOLIAS, one of the Cuer- 
vo getic and prosperous farmers of Cascade 
county, residing near Eden, first came to Montana 
in 1887. He was born at Kalling Kou, Germany, 
February 20, 1849, the son of Christopher and 
Henrietta Kukolias, the father being a native of 
Kokaman, and the mother of Kalling Kou. The 
father was a farmer, dying at Bismarck, Ger- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



many, at the age of seventy, and the mother died 
at Rose, aged fifty. Mr. Kukolias was reared in 
Kalling Kou, and in his childhood attended the 
pubHc schools, and between the ages of fourteen 
and fifteen he was set to diligent labor on his 
father's farm, and at twenty years of age, in 1869, 
he began learning carpetmaking, which business 
he followed quite successfully for some years. 

Air. Kukolias came to the United States in 1887, 
and from New York he came at once to Winne- 
bago, Mont., and his first employment in the 
territory was building snowsheds for the North- 
ern Pacific Railway. From 1888 to 1890 he manu- 
factured carpets at Great Falls. He also worked 
in the smelter. In 1890 he took up a pre-emption 
claim of 160 acres of land, and began to raise stock, 
commencing with thirty-five head of cattle. Twen- 
ty-five acres of this land he cultivated and in 1895 
he supplemented his property by a homestead claim 
of t6o acres. He now has 320 acres, on which he 
raises bountiful crops and fine stock, and is in pros- 
perous circumstances. In 1869, before coming 
to the United States, Mr. Kukolias was married to 
Miss Anna Haguer, daughter of Gottlieb and Alary 
(Clay) Haguer, of De Julan, Germany. They were 
natives of De Julan. The father died at that place 
at the age of fifty-four, the mother at the age of 
fifty-six. 



WILLIAAI LAHERTY.— Among the pioneer 
citizens of the state there are none who merit 
representation in this work more assuredly than do 
Air. Laherty and his estimable wife. Air. Laherty 
is a native of County Tipperary, Ireland, born on 
April II, 1823, the son of William and Alice (Cos- 
tello) Laherty. natives of Tipperary, who passed 
their lives in the Emerald Isle, where the father 
was a farmer. William Laherty received a limited 
educational training in die national schools of Ire- 
land, and he early learned to depend upon his own 
resources. .-Vt the age of fifteen years he started 
for America, landing in New York in 1838, after 
having suffered disastrous shipwreck off the Ber- 
muda Islands. From New York city he made his 
way to Lawrence, Alass.. where he remained six 
months, then located in Bangor, Maine, and there 
learned the trade of ship carpenter, and followed 
this vocation for some time, after which he removed 
to Wisconsin, and was employed in lumbering for 
three vears. after which he went to Chicago, then 



scarcely more than a straggling village, and as- 
sisted in erecting some of the first grain elevators 
of the west. He was ever ready to take up any 
honest occupation and to accommodate himself to 
circumstances, and his aim was a definite one, that 
of making a home for himself. Thus his ultimate 
aim was never obscure, though he was compelled to 
seek the desired goal by a somewhat circuitous 
route. 

Finally Air. Laherty became identified with rail- 
roading, and as a carpenter aided in the erection 
of the first railroad station between Chicago and 
Detroit, on both the Michigan Southern and the 
Michigan Central Railroads, which were practically 
the first to enter Chicago. His next business ven- 
ture was radically different, for he went to St. 
Louis, AIo., and found occupation on steamboats 
plying on the Mississippi, Tennessee and Cumber- 
land rivers and also running to ports on the lower 
Alississippi, including New Orleans. In 1862 Mr. 
Laherty made the long and hazardous trip across 
the plains with ox teams, his first stopping place 
being at Fort Bridger, Wyo., where he found em- 
ployment in the mercantile establishment of Judge 
Carter. In the spring of 1863 he continued his 
journey to Montana, attracted hither by the dis- 
covery of gold in Alder gulch, where he devoted his 
attention to mining for two years, then, in 1865, re- 
moving to Blackfoot City, at that time in Deer 
Lodge county and a flourishing mining camp. In 
the fall of 1866 he took his family to Bitter Rpot 
valley, to afford the children the educational facil- 
ities there provided, the scholastic institutions on 
the frontier being few and far between, with facil- 
ities of most primitive order. In the following 
spring he returned to Blackfoot City, and until 
1867 was engaged in business at Carpenter bar, in 
which locality he made his home. In 1867 also he 
removed across the range to Lincoln gulch, and 
thence in 1869 to Vestal, near Alarysville. He con- 
tinued to live in that vicinity until 1881, when 
he took up his location on, his present ranch in the 
Nevada valley, three miles east of Helmville. Powell 
county, which is his postoffice address. Here he 
has since devoted his attention to diversified farm- 
ing and to the raising of livestock, and he has 
realized his ambition and established an attractive 
and valuable home, from which an assured income 
has been derived during all the lonsf intervening 
years. Air. Laherty accumulated additional tracts 
of land from time to time, and after giving much 
of it to his children, he still retains a fine farm of 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



260 acres, well improved and under effective culti- 
vation. 

No man in the community is held in higher es- 
teem, and, notwithstanding his advanced age, he 
is hale and hearty, remarkably active and energetic, 
and counts himself able to compete in the work of 
the ranch with many of the "j'oung fellows." His 
wide and varied experiences make Mr. Laherty a 
most interesting conversationalist and raconteur, 
and both he and his estimable wife relate many in- 
teresting tales of the pioneer epoch. He has never 
been identified with mining since leaving Alder gulch 
and wherever he maintained his home prior to lo- 
cating on his present ranch he raised cattle, con- 
ducted meat markets, and was identified with other 
enterprises. In politics Mr. Laherty gives his sup- 
port to the Democratic party, but has never sought 
otifice. In 1864, at Alder gulch, Mr. Laherty was 
united in marrias^e to Mrs. Catherine Coghlin, nee 
Maher, the widow of David Coghlin, one of the 
pioneer miners of Colorado. She was born in Coun- 
ty Clare, Ireland, and came to the United States 
in 1846, practically alone, save the companionship 
of a few of her old neighbors. She encountered 
shipwreck on the voyage, as did also Mr. Laherty 
at the time of his emigration to America. Her par- 
ents passed their lives in Ireland, but she had de- 
termined to make her own way in the world, and 
her self-reliance and sterling character gained her 
uniform respect and confidence in the strange land 
and among strangers. She first located in Quebec. 
Canada, and was later a resident of Cincinnati, 
Chicago, and finally of Sioux City, Iowa, where 
was celebrated her marriage to David Coghlin, with 
whom she crossed the plains to Colorado in i860. 
His death there occurred soon afterward, and in 
1863 she came to Alder gulch, Mont., where she 
married Mr. Laherty. By her first marriage Mrs. 
Laherty is the mother of four children, Maurice. 
Cornelius, Mary A., wife of Thomas McCormick, 
and David. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Laherty are Kate A., wife of James W. Geary, Wil- 
liam C, Edward J. and James P. 



GEORGE LAMBERT, postmaster of Winston, 
Broadwater county, is also one of the most 
progressive and enterprising merchants of that 
city. He was born in Bethnel Green, E. C, Lon- 
don, England, on November 20, 1850, the son of 
George and Betsey (Bennett) Lambert, natives of 



Suffolk. They were married at Ipswich and made 
their home in London, where Mr. Lambert engaged 
in the wholesale and retail tobacco trade. He died 
in London in 1854 and his wife in 1890. Their 
children were Elizabeth, Rosetta, Alice, Betsey, 
George and James. Both the paternal grandfather, 
James Lambert, and the maternal grandfather, 
George Bennett, were natives of Bramford, County 
Suffolk, where the families had been residents and 
farmers for many generations. George Lambert, 
Sr., the father of the Winston merchant, was one 
of a family of two sons and four daughters. 

George Lambert, now of Winston, after attend- 
ance at the parochial schools, enlisted in the Royal 
Artillery in July, 1867. He served in England 
until 1872, when he came to HaHfax, N. S., with 
his regiment, continuing with it until 1873, and 
at the exercises contingent on the arrival of Lord 
Dufferin Mr. Lambert as a bombadier fired the 
salute from Georges Island. He left the Royal 
Artillery in 1873, and received an honorable dis- 
charge during the Queen's jubilee. He then en- 
gaged in farming in Maine until the spring of 
1 881. Mr. Lambert removed from Maine in 188 1 
reaching Beaver creek, Mont., in April. He has 
resided at Winston from that time, and has been 
very successful, financially and socially. At first he 
engaged in the hotel business and merchandising, 
but of recent years he has confined his attention 
to commercial pursuits. 

Mr. Lambert is in close touch with the Dem- 
ocratic party and is an influential worker in its 
ranks. In 1886 he was elected county commis- 
sioner of Jefferson count) and was re-elected in 
1888. He was chairman of the board during the 
important period of the construction of the court 
house at Boulder. In 1892 he was elected justice' 
of the peace, and was appointed clerk of the dis- 
trict court by the legislative assembly on the or- 
ganization of Broadwater county. For a number 
of terms he served as school trustee and holds 
the commission of postmaster of Winston, and tV.e 
duties of the office, like all others he has held, are 
discharged with fidelity and popular satisfaction. 
Fraternally he is a member of the United Worlanen 
and has been an Odd Fellow since 1873, joining the 
order in Halifax, N. S. 

On August 29, 1879, Mr. Lambert married Miss 
Celinda Bennett, of Waldo, ]\Iaine, the daughter 
of George and Mary (Mitchell) Bennett, who had 
left Ohio and settled in Maine. The maternal 
grandfather, John Mitchell, had come from Eng- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



land to the United States, and in Ohio married a 
lady named Sawyer. Mr. and Mrs. Lambert have 
had three children, two of them having died -in 
infancy. Minnie Maude is the sole survivor. 



lOHN MARTIN SMITH, of Martinsdale, 
J Mont., is a native of Fairfield county, Tuscar- 
awas county, Ohio, having been born in that place 
October 6, 1833. He is a son of Valentine and Fan- 
nie (Phillips) Smith, the former a native of West- 
moreland county, and the latter of Pottsville, Pa. 
The subject of this sketch comes of a long lived 
race, his paternal grandfather having been born 
of English parentage, who came to America and 
settled in territory which is now Pennsylvania, prior 
to the Revolutionary war. 

James Smith, the grandfather, married a daugh- 
ter of John Heninger, against the wish of his par- 
ents, and in consequence was disinherited, there- 
fore when a young man was thrown upon his own 
resources. He died in early life leaving a wife and 
two sons, Valentine and John, the former of whom 
is the father of our subject. John Heininger, the 
maternal grandfather, was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary war for a period of seven years. He was a 
man large in stature and of robust make-up, and fol- 
lowed the vocation of farming and blacksmithing 
until eighty years of age. He died in his ninety- 
ninth year, while his wife died at the age of 109. 

N'alentine Smith, the subject's father, was but a 
child of three years when his father died, and was 
reared to manhood by Col. Halferty, of Westmore- 
land county. Pa., with whom he remained until 
sixteen years of age. At this early age Mr. Smith 
started in life empty handed, and worked for a 
time in coal mines, later emigrated to Ohio, where 
he continued coal mining and for a time worked on 
packet boats on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers be- 
tween Pittsburg and New Orleans. While living in 
southeastern Ohio he was married to Miss Fannie 
Phillips, who proved to be a valuable helpmeet 
tlirough life. They became the parents of nine 
children, of whom four sons and three daughters 
grew to man and womanhood, namely, James P., 
John M., Eva, Armina M., William A., Andrew A. 
and Fannie. In the year 1840 Mr. Smith removed 
to Williams county, Ohio, and settled in the woods, 
and here lived the life of a pioneer, and reared his 
family. He improved a forty-acre farm from the 
forest, and was for years a local minister in the 



United Brethren church. His death occurred in 1864 
at the age of sixty-three years. The wife and 
mother continued to reside on the homestead famri 
until her death in 1873, aged seventy years. She 
too had been a lifelong member of the United 
Brethren church, and was well and most favorably 
known in that locality. 

John M. Smith was the second son and third born 
of the family of nine children, owing to the lim- 
ited facilities for schools on the frontier of Ohio, 
he received a meager education. He remained 
at home with his parents until the age of twenty- 
one years and contributed by his labor to the sup- 
port of the family, and in addition to this by work- 
ing for meager wages for the neighbors and cutting 
cord wood for twenty-five cents per cord, he paid 
for twenty acres of land adjoining that of his 
father, which was heavily timbered and with his 
own hands at odd times, chopped and cleared the 
entire tract, and presented it to his father. 

In the year 1854 desiring to seek his fortune 
in the west, Mr. Smith took passage by steamer to 
Panama, thence to California. Here he engaged 
in mining until i860 with varying success, when 
he went with the rush to Virginia City, Colo., and 
here prospected during that year in the vicinity 
of Gold Hill, or the famous Comstock mine. While 
in this vicinity the Ute Indian war took place 
which made frontier life very dangerous. Return- 
ing to California, he remained until 1863, when 
he went to Portland, Ore., thence to -the Dalles, 
and from there he with several associates with 
pack animals went to the territory of Idaho, lo- 
cating at Placerville, where he continued to follow 
the occupation of mining. The following morn- 
ing after his arrival, he witnessed a gambler, known 
as Snap and Ante, kill a man with a pick handle, 
and about one hour and a half later Mr. Duncan, 
an auctioneer, had the murdered man's goods up 
and sold at auction to pay funeral expenses. In 
the year 1864 he joined the stampede up Snake 
river and across the lava bed into Camas creek 
country, and here for the first time saw a mirage. 
At the latter place, he and his party met the out- 
laws, Fred Patterson, Joe Peters and others of the 
same class, several of whom afterwards met tragic 
deaths. In the spring of 1866 he came to the ter- 
ritory of Montana, locating in Last Chance gulch, 
where he engaged in mining until fall, when he 
went into the Gallatin valley and run a threshing 
machine, which was engaged in the business of 
custom threshing. They were paid at the rate of 




'^ 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1113 



twenty-five cents' per bushel for wheat and twenty 
cents for oats. During that fall he threshed the 
crop of Hon. David E. Folsom, who lived on 
Willow creek, and now a prominent citizen of 
White Sulphur Springs. The year following M.v. 
Smith farmed a ranch in Gallatin valley, but the 
grasshoppers harvested the crop, and for nearly 
twenty-five years, at intervals, he carried on placer 
mining in Thompson's gulch. During the winter 
of 1871-72 he helped to build the first cabin on 
the Musselshell river near where the town of 
Martinsdale now stands. In 1873 he located a 
ranch and built a residence on the Musselshell, 
about four miles southwest from Martinsdale, 
which has been his home ever since. At that time 
in partnership with his brother William A. Smith, 
purchased 100 head of stock cattle in Idaho 
and drove them into the Musselshell valley with a 
view of engaging in the cattle business. Two years 
later the Smith brothers in company with Mr. 
McDonald, under the firm name of Smith Bros. 
& McDonald, purchased 900 ewes of John Haley, 
of Boise City, Idaho, which they trailed across 
the country into the Musselshell valley. The part- 
ners did their own herding and managed their busi- 
ness in a careful and economical manner, which 
proved quite a success. In 1877 the firm of Smith 
Bros, sold their cattle at $12.50 per head and in 
company with Mr. Grande, firm name Smith Bros. 
& Grande, purchased 2,000 stock sheep of John 
Haley, which were driven across the country by 
William A. Smith and this copartnership continued 
one year, when the firm dissolved and divided 
their stock and near the same time the firm of 
Smith Bros. & McDonald also dissolved and divided 
their stock, after which the firm of Smith Brothers 
continued in business. 

On February 12, 1897, William A. Smith passed 
away, of pneumonia, at White Sulphur Springs. 
Since the year 1864, the two brothers had been asso- 
ciated together in all business enterprises, and were 
much devoted to one another. The death of the 
younger of the two was a severe blow to the sur- 
viving brother. William A. was born in Williams 
county, Ohio, in 1843, his wife being Nannie 
(Hodges) Smith, since deceased. Three children 
survive them, and are attending school. At the 
time of the death of William A. Smith, his interest 
in the firm business of Smith Brothers was ap- 
praised at the sum of $62,000, and two years later 
the subject of this sketch purchased the same, pay- 
ing therefor the sum of $85,000. 



Since that time, the business, through the careful 
and able management of Mr. Smith, has grown 
very largely, and he is now one of the heaviest and 
most prosperous stockowners in the state. In 1902 
he sheared 43,000 sheep, and raised 20,000 lambs. 
He is now the owner of 25,000 acres of patented 
land, and holds 35,000 acres in addition under 
contract, besides 20,000 acres which he holds under 
lease from the state in Park and Meagher counties. 
An older brother of Mr. Smith, Dr. James P. 
Smith, who was a distinguished physician of 
Moulton, Iowa, passed away March 9, 1897, aged 
sixty-nine years. 

On October 6, 1887, Mr. Smith was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Hofifman, a native of Ger- 
mantown, Ohio. To them one child was born, John 
Stanley Smith, who is a very promising young man. 

Politically, Mr. Smith is identified with the Re- 
publican party, and takes an active interest in pub- 
lic affairs. Fraternally he is a member of the Ma- 
sonic Order and is a Knight Templar. In the year 
1900, Mr. Smith erected a beautiful home in the 
city of Pasadena, Gal., at the cost of over $20,000, 
and he resides there with his family during the 
winter season, spending his summers in Montana, 
looking after the management of his varied business 
interests. 

Mr. Smith is one of the worthy pioneers of Mon- 
tana and has well earned the title of a self-made 
man. He is recognized as one of the most sub- 
stantial and successful . business men of the state 
of Montana. By his integrity, attention to business 
and keen ability, he has built up one of the largest 
stock properties of the state. His home ranch, situ- 
ated near Martinsdale, in Meagher county, has 
the proportions of a small village. His interests 
are enormous, and extend throughout the state. 



JOSEPH LAVOIE, one of the pioneer cattle- 
raisers and general ranchers residing near Kib- 
bey. Cascade county, was born in Montreal, Canada, 
July 3, 1852. His parents were Joseph and Esther 
Lavoie, residents of Montreal, where the father 
was engaged in the grain threshing business, meet- 
ing with good success. He passed away in 1886, 
a devout member of the Catholic church, as is his 
wife who survives him. 

Until the age of twelve years Joseph Lavoie was 
an industrious student in the public schools of 
Montreal; he then began to assist his father in 



III4 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



the threshing machine industry, and with him re- 
mained until he attained his majority. Two years 
subsequently, in 1874, he went to Nevada and there 
secured a contract to cut wood, and in this employ- 
ment he continued seven years, meeting with fairly 
remunerative success. In 1881 he removed to 
Butte, Mont., purchased an interest in a saw mill 
and conducted the business for three successive 
years. Disposing of his mill interest he settled on 
his present home ranch near Kibbey, comprising 
three quarter sections of land, for one of which he 
paid $2,600. Three hundred acres of this land are fit 
for cultivation. Mr. Lavoie is considered a success- 
ful cattle and grain grower. The first twelve years 
of his residence on this property he was engaged 
in the threshing machine and saw mill business, 
both of which enterprises proved remunerative, and 
he has taken them up again for the last few years 
and continues to operate them both. 

Mr. Lavoie was married November 7, 1886, to 
Miss Mary Gehan, of Wisconsin, daughter of Pat- 
rick and Elva Gehan. Her mother was born in 
New York and her father in Pennsylvania, the 
latter being by occupation a farmer. They are both 
members of the Catholic church; politically the 
father is a Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Lavoie are 
the parents of seven children : Joseph, Wilfred, 
Clara. Mary, Florence. Blanche and George. 



PETER LE BEAU. — This gentleman has seen 
a great deal of life in the west and has lived 
to enjoy a "good bit" of financial prosperity. This 
is fully attested by the handsome residence he has 
built on his ranch near Salesville, Gallatin county, 
where he is living in the enjoyment of a high place 
in the estimation of the public. He is a native of 
Three Rivers. Quebec, born July 16, 1829, the son 
of Augustus and Dorata (Sicard De Carufel) Le 
Beau. Both his paternal and maternal ancestors 
were for many generations prominent in France, 
and the De Carufels, a noble family, emigrated 
from France to Canada during one of the early 
French revolutions, and his maternal grandfather 
was a Sicard De Carufel. His paternal grand- 
father was named .Augustus Le Beau. 

Peter Le Beau passed his early years at private 
schools in Quebec until he was fourteen. He then 
was employed as clerk in a general store for nine 
years. In 1852 he went to California by the Panama 
route, arriving at San Francisco in May, where 



he found his uncle, one of the Argonauts of 'forty- 
nine, who had desired his nephew should join him. 
For four years Peter Le Beau remained with his 
uncle, employed in successful mining enterprises, 
and on June i, 1856, he returned to Quebec for a 
visit of six months, going thence to St. Paul, Minn., 
where he passed eight years in active business and 
fanning. June 7, 1864, Mr. Le Beau started over- 
land for Montana, accompanying one of the histor- 
ical trains of Capt. Fisk. Fifteen miles from the 
Little Missouri they were surrounded by a war 
party of 1,000 Sioux, and for three days a hotly con- 
tested engagement continued, in which Capt. 
Fisk's party lost thirteen men. Scouts were sent 
by night to Fort Rice for reinforcements, but be- 
fore they arrived the Indians sent a letter to Capt. 
Fisk, written by a Mrs. Kelly, who had been cap- 
tured by the Sioux in July, 1864, near Fort Lara- 
mie. In this letter she stated that the Indian loss 
in the three days' fighting was about 300, and that 
they also were trying to secure aid. They 
desired peace and certain provisions of Capt. Fisk, 
which he agreed to give if the captive woman was 
liberated the next morning and delivered to his 
party. An Indian chief came the next morning and 
said that the woman did not want to join the Fisk 
company, preferring to go with the Indians to Fort 
Rice. The Indians received the desired provisions 
and no more trouble occurred. Seventeen days 
later, when the soldiers from the fort arrived, the 
commanding officer removed Capt. Fisk from charge 
of the expedition, and ordered all to go to Fort 
Rice. There Gen. Sully told them that if they de- 
sired to go down the river he would send a com- 
pany of soldiers with them. A number of the party 
accepted this proposition, among them Mr. Le 
Beau, who went to Omaha, where he remained four 
months. He then accompanied L^nited States Mar- 
shal Hunt to Denver, where they arrived on April 
I, 1865. Here, with three others, he purchased a 
mule team, started for Montana, and after a pleas- 
ant trip arrived in Virginia City on June i, 1865. 
Three days later he went to Butte, where the sole 
signs of civilization were twelve men washing dirt 
in the creek and two cabins. That season he passed 
in mining there with fair success, and then went to 
French gulch. Deer Lodge county, worked until 
September, 1866, and "went broke." He then, 
with a partner, worked the placers at Highland 
gulch successfully until 1870. when he removed 
to Cedar creek, made some money and remained 
until September, 1871, when he located in Gallatin 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



i"5 



valley and secured the homestead where he is now- 
living, near Wefet Gallatin river, one mile from 
Salesville, where he is developing- one of the finest 
estates to be seen in many a mile of distance. Here 
he has 310 acres of well irrigated land, ujxm which 
he raises bounteous crops of wheat, barley, oats 
and hay. He enjoys the hearty friendship and re- 
spect of the best people of the valley. On March 
7, 1859, Mr. Le Beau married Miss Mary Ploudre, 
daughter of Edward Ploudre, of Three Rivers, 
Quebec. Their only child, Peter Arthur, is dead, 
while his mother also passed from earth on Febru- 
ary I, 1862. Near Mr. Le Beau's residence is a 
large pond which he has stocked with 30,000 trout 
that are amply provided with food by the crawfish 
which swarm in the pond. It is his intention to 
ship from this pond to the city markets in the near 
future so.ooo trout annually. 



devoted his attention to work in this line. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Leitel four children have been bom, two 
being deceased — Clara and an infant son; the two 
surviving are Eugene C. and Georgiana. 



JOSEPH S. LEITEL is numbered among the en- 
terprising farmers and stockgrowers of Lewis 
and Clarke county, his ranch being located in the 
Prickly Pear valley, nine miles north of Helena. 
Mr. Leitel is a native of Bavaria, Germany, where 
he was born on March 9, 1863, the son of Michael 
and Monacka Leitel, who emigrated from the 
Fatherland in 1873, located in Carroll county, Iowa, 
and there continued to reside until 1881, when they 
removed to Los Angeles, Cal.. which has since been 
their home, the father devoting his attention to 
agricultural pursuits. Both are devout members of 
the Catholic church. Joseph S. Leitel received his 
education in the common schools of his native land 
and assisted his father in his farming operations 
until attaining the age of twenty-two 3'ears. In 
1887 he located in the state of Washington, and 
was employed in a logging camp for eight months, 
removing thence to Helena, Mont., where he pre- 
empted a claim of eighty acres nine miles north of 
the city, and devoted his attention to farming and 
stockraising, making excellent improvements on his 
ranch. 

In politics he gives his allegiance to the Demo- 
cratic party; in religion he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Catholic church. On September 30, 
1890, Mr. Leitel was united in marriage to Miss 
Louisa Yunz. who was born in Switzerland, the 
daughter of Urs and Louisa Yunz. The father em- 
igrated from Switzerland in 1882, his wife having 
died in 1880. He is a carpenter by trade, and has 



JAMES T. LEE, who is recognized as one of the 
leaders in the Montana sheep industry, now re- 
sides at Great Falls. He was born on Septem- 
ber 18, 1855, at Kansas City, Mo. His father was 
born on March 8, 1808, in Yorkshire, England, 
where for fourteen years he was engaged in 
ministerial labors and coming to the United 
States and locating at St. Louis, Mo., in 
1850. He joined the Missouri conference, and 
was first stationed at Kansas City. In 1854 he 
marHed Mrs. Mary Ann Perkins, nee Cook, born 
on June 21, 181 8, in Salem county. Mo. She was 
the niece of Capt. John Cook, the eminent Eng- 
lish navigator. Rev. Mr. Lee died on March 12, 
1872, his wife surviving him until November 10, 
1888. 

James T. Lee received his early education in 
Kansas City, and supplemented this after the death 
of his father by one year's attendance at Lewis 
College at Glasgow, Mo. In 1873 he and his 
mother went fifteen miles south of Kansas City 
to a farm, where for two years he worked for 
wages and later he conducted farming on his own 
account with fair success. In 1878 he embarked 
on the steamer Red Cloud for Fort Benton, Mont. 
He was forty-three days on the journey, and upon 
reaching liis temporary destination he hired a 
wagon to haul his trunks to Sun River Crossing. 
With the other men of the party he walked the 
entire distance. On May 20 of that year he went 
to Chestnut valley to visit his half-brother, a 
wealthy cattleraiser, and finally entered his em- 
ployment and in June, 1878, he took charge of 
his ranch and business until 1881. 

Mr. Lee then went to Sand coulee, and took up 
a pre-emption claim, which he began to improve 
into a productive ranch. As illustrative of what 
labor this involved it may be mentioned that he 
hauled the lumber necessary to build four miles 
of fence, a house and stock buildings twenty-five 
miles. In 1882 Mr.' Lee made a visit to Kansas 
City, where he purchased quite an amount of 
furniture and farm implements, and, on his return 
to Montana, built a six-room frame house on his 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



ranch. In 1883 he made an application to have 
township No. 20, range 4 east, surveyed, which 
was done in the spring of 18B4. That fall he pur- 
chased 1,000 sheep at Pendleton, Ore., and shipped 
them to Montana. Upon unloading them at Horse 
Plains, for feeding purposes, 400 were poisoned 
and died, the remaining 600 were brought to Sand 
Coulee and in 1887 had increased 3,000 head. In 
October, 1890, he sold his sheep, then numbering 
6,400 head, for $18,240. He then engaged in real 
estate, buying considerable city property and also 
more land, turning the latter into a hay ranch. 
In 1892 he bought the Great Falls livery barn, 
which property he retained until 1897. Since then 
he has confined himself to the superintendence of 
his ranches. 

The Montana life of Mr. Lee has been eminently 
successful. He is a selfmade man, who while he 
has encountered obstacles, has by force of char- 
acter and superior business ability, overcome them 
all and gained a considerable share of prosperity. 

On January 13, 1884, Mr. Lee was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ella Belle, of Utica, Ohio, daughter 
of James and Nancy Belle. Her father died in 1858 
and her mother now lives in Great Falls. Mr. Lee's 
home is graced with the presence of his two daugh- 
ters, Anna Bell, born on March 12, 1885, and Bes- 
sie, bom January 13, 1889. 



p ATRICK H. LUDDY, of Jefferson City, Mont., 
1 one of the successful mining operators of the 
state, is essentially and pre-eminently a self-made 
man. His pathway through life, for a considerable 
portion of it at least, has been strewn with obstacles 
and difficulties, but with manly self-reliance, con- 
tinuous perseverance and commendable energy, he 
has overcome them and won in his fight with ad- 
verse circumstances a substantial and highly gratify- 
ing triumph. His parents were William and Bridget 
(Pendergrast) Luddy, both natives of Ireland, who 
emigrated to America in 1825, and settled in Troy, 
N. Y., where their son, Patrick H. Luddy, was 
born on January i, 1847, one of nine children. He 
was an early arrival in Montana, and from that 
time he has been actively engaged in mining and 
other business ventures. At present one of his lead- 
ing properties is the Benecia Shea mine, a very val- 
uable possession located two miles west of Jefferson 
City. In this city in which he makes his home, Mr. 
Luddy has one of the most attractive and admired 
residences in the county. 



Mr. Luddy has been deeply interested in the wel- 
fare of the county and state in which he has taken 
up his residence, and has given much of his time 
and energy to local public affairs. He has been for 
a number of years a prominent member of the Jef- 
ferson City school board, and in 1898 was elected 
to the lower house of the state legislature. In the 
ensuing session he took an intelligent part in the 
proceedings and gave his constituents good ser- 
vice. He was united in marriage with Miss Rose 
Daley, a native of Maryland, the marriage having 
occurred in Schuylerville, N. Y., on October 13, 
1876. They are the parents of five children, Wil- 
liam, Frederick, Josie, Rose and John. In fra- 
ternal relations Mr. Luddy is allied with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. Politically he is an 
ardent and zealous Democrat, and to that party has 
given loyal and faithful service, both in the ranks 
of its workers and as a candidate and chosen repre- 
sentative. 



MORTIMER N. LEASE, one of the leading con- 
tractors and builders of Great Falls, and thus 
identified with an • enterprise which has important 
bearing upon the industrial progress and substan- 
tial upbuilding of any community, is distinctly one 
of the progressive young business men of the city. 
Mr. Lease is a native of Forest City, Mo., born on 
May 10, 1869, the son of Tobias and Mary (Powe) 
Lease. His father, a native of Virginia, accompan- 
ied his parents to Ohio when he was a small boy. 
After his school days he learned the carpenter's 
trade, and upon attaining maturity removed to Mis- 
souri, where he worked at his trade until the out- 
break of the Civil war, when, in 1861, he enlisted in 
the Union army, in Company F, Thirty-third Mis- 
souri Infantry. On December 16, 1864, he was 
wounded at Nashville, Tenn., and was then dis- 
charged by reason of disability. Returning to his 
home in Missouri, he there engaged in agriculture 
and merchandising until his death, on December 28, 
1898. His wife still maintains her home in Forest 
City. 

Mortimer N. Lease attended the public schools 
of his native town, and upon attaining the age of 
nineteen entered upon a three-years apprenticeship 
at the carpenter trade, under the effective direction 
of his brother, Newton T. Lease. In 1888 he came 
to Cascade, Mont., where he worked at his trade 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



.117 



until 1890, when he came to Great Falls and en- 
tered the employ of his brother Newton, with whom 
he remained until 1896, when he himself began con- 
tracting and building. Mr. Lease has met with 
excellent success, and is known to be ever faithful 
to the terms of a contract and to utilize onlj' the 
most straightforward business methods. He erected 
the Boston Heights school building, the North Side 
fire station, the Minot block, the Thompson block, 
the Taylor hotel, and a large number of private 
dwellings in Great Falls, and his business is con- 
stantly expanding through his energetic and well 
directed eflforts. In political matters Mr. Lease 
maintains an independent attitude, giving his sup- 
port to the men and measures which His judgment 
best endorses. Fraternally be is identified with the 
Odd Fellows, retaining membership at Cascade. 

On July 20, 1892, Mr. Lease was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Catharine Munro, a daughter of 
Hugh Munro. She was born in Elgin county, 
Ont. Of this union have come two children, Belle 
]\Tay and Clista Lizzie. 



I^HOMAS LEWIS, now practically retired from 
active business life, maintains his residence 
in the attractive city of Bozeman. He is a native 
of the state of Ohio, where he was born in 1842, 
the son of John and Nancy Lewis, who emigrated 
from Wales about the year 1838, settling first in 
Ohio, whence they removed to Missouri when our 
subject was a mere child. There the mother died, 
and within a short time afterward the boy was 
doubly bereaved, his father dying at Emporia, 
Kan. Thus at a very early age Mr. Lewis was left 
dependent upon his own resources. His schol- 
astic advantages were meagre in the extreme, at- 
tending the district school in a desultory way until 
he was nine years of age, since which time it 
has never been his privilege to enter a school-house 
as a student. He began work at the early age of 
ten, and at thirteen figured as a full-fledged ' 
"hired man," working by the day or month 
at any kinfl of farm labor he was fortunate enough 
to secure, and the courageous qualities thus early 
developed have been the dominating characteris- 
tics of the man. In 1859 Mr. Lewis determined to 
try his fortune in the west, and as the Pike's Peak 
country was attracting much attention he made 
his wa> thitlier. That he had to endure periods of 



ill-luck is true, but, like the true philosopher, well 
knew that the pathway to success is not strewn with 
flowers, hence his experience at Pike's Peak was 
not an unsatisfactory one. In reference thereto he 
says: "After I 'got broke' I was glad to return 
to old Missouri." There he remained until the 
spring of 1863, working industriously and saving 
his wages, being still convinced that he could win 
success in the west, to which he decided to return. 
Securing his outfit at St. Joseph, Mo., he set forth 
on the weary journey across the plains to Mon- 
tana, driving four mules. The trip consumed nine- 
ty-three days, and in the spring of 1866 he arrived 
in Gallatin valley, which has since practically been 
his home, although in 1864-5 he was engaged in 
mining in Alder gulch, near Virginia City, and also 
about two miles below the site of the present city 
of Butte, then marked only by a few log cabins. 
In the spring of 1866 Mr. Lewis came to Bozeman, 
where he was employed in a saw mill and at other 
work until the fall of 1868, when he rented and 
operated a threshing machine during the season. 
In the following spring he traded his outfit for a 
farm, with crops all in, disposing of this property 
after harvest. In 1870 he resumed mining opera- 
tions, but in the spring following he assumed the 
management of a ranch in Gallatin county. In 
T872 he took charge of a wagon train for the 
firm of Willson & Rich, with whom he remained 
until the fall of 1877, when he purchased the mules 
and wagons and continued operations in freighting 
during one season. He seems to have had the 
Yankee facility of driving a good bargain, being 
always ready to sell out or buy, usually profiting 
by the transaction. Thus, in 1878, he sold his 
wagon train and purchased an interest in the 
mercantile business of Gen. Willson in Boze- 
man, this association continuing about a year, 
when he gave another evidence of his business 
xersatility. In 1880 he was associated with Maj. 
i'ease in a trading post at the mouth of the Still- 
water river! In i88r he took over 600 head of 
cattle to the Chicago market, being associated in 
this enterprise with J. H. Wells. In the spring 
of 1882 he entered into partnership with L. H. 
Carey, and began the manufacturing of brick at 
Uozeman. After his marriage Mr. Lewis felt that 
for the first time he was in a position to assume 
a fi.xed habitation, and in the fall of 1883 he pur- 
chased the interest of the junior partner of the 
firm of Willson & Rich, conducting a grocery busi- 
ness until the succeeding fall, when the partner- 



[i8 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



ship was dissolved by mutual consent. On the 
organization of the Bozeman National Bank he 
became a member of its directorate, and upon re- 
tiring from the grocery business he was choseji 
vice-president of the bank, resigning this office 
and disposing of his stock in the fall of 1888. 
Since that time he Ikis been practically retired, 
though his extensive real estate and financial inter- 
ests still engross much of his time and attention. 
A life of so marked activity could scarcely merge 
into one of absolute quietude, and Mr. Lewis is, 
in the truest sense, still to be considered as one 
of the world's workers, as he will doubtless be 
until the close of his long and useful life. In 
1890 he purchased his present beautiful home in 
P.ozeman, and here enjoys that reward which is 
not denied to those who have a true regard 
for the dignity of honest toil and integrity of 
purpose. 

In pohtics Mr. Lewis has always given his sup- 
port to the Democratic party, his first presidential 
vote having been cast in favor of Grover Cleve- 
land ; and while he has always manifested reluct- 
ance to accept public ofifice of any description, he 
has not been entirely able to avoid public respon- 
sibilities. In 1889 he was appointed a meml>er of 
the board of county commissioners of Gallatin 
county to fill a vacancy, and such was that body's 
appreciation of the value of his counsel and prac- 
tical business methods, that he was elected chair- 
man of the board. In the spring of 1896 
he was elected a member of the municipal 
council of Bozeman. Mr. Lewis is a valued mem- 
ber of the State Pioneers' Society, and in 1894 
he was chosen first vice-president of the local 
county organization. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order, and he and his family are 
regular attendants of the Protestant Episcopal 
church. It has been well said that "His record 
as a man of honor is untarnished, and wherever 
he is known his word is as good as a gold bond." 
( )n July 16, 1882, Mr. Lewis was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Kate N. Martin, a daughter of 
Judge Josephus P. Martin, of whom individual 
mention is made on other pages of this work. 
They are the parents of one daughter, Edna, who 
is now a student in the State University at Boze- 
man. Mrs. Lewis is a graduate of the California 
State Normal School at San Jose, in the public 
schools of which she was a teacher for five years, 
also teaching in the Bozeman schools two terms 
prior to her marriage. 



HUGH S. LEWIS.— The ancestry of the sub- 
ject of this narrative was of good Welsh stock 
long serviceable in the civil and military history 
of that country. His father, John Lewis, emigrated 
from there to the United States when a young man, 
settling at Rome, New York, where his widow, 
Elizabeth (Morris) Lewis, also a native of Wales, 
still lives, and where their son Hugh was born 
January 25, 1863. The father was an industrious 
farmer, pursuing that occupation with success until 
his death in 1876. 

Hugh S. Lewis began his education in the pub- 
lic schools at Floyd, N. Y., and finished it at the 
Holland Patent Academy in that state. In 1881 
he removed to Rockford, 111., where he worked on 
a farm one summer, going from there to Fort 
Snelling, Minn., in 1882, and there spending fifteen 
months as a purchasing messenger for the quar- 
termaster's department. In July he located near 
Hathaway, Mont., taking up a squatter's claim, 
and owing to his improvements harvested a 
quantity of hay. In September he went to Boze- 
man, where he bought his first sheep and trailed 
them back to his ranch the same fall. In 1886 
he sold his claim and moved his sheep to Howard, 
Alont. His first winter at this place was the mild 
one of 1886-7 and although he had neither hay 
nor sheds he came through the winter with the 
nominal loss of ten per cent. In 1888 he pre- 
empted a claim on Reservation creek, where he 
now has a fine ranch of 12,000 acres devoted 
to sheep. His specialty is a superior grade of 
Delaine Merino sheep, and for the past twelve 
years he has devoted himself to the production 
of rams for the use of woolgrowers in this and ad- 
joining states, having on the ranch regularly from 
3,000 to 5,000 sheep. In politics Mr. Lewis is a 
Republican, but not an active worker. He was 
united in marriage with Miss Mary J. Jones at 
Rome, N. Y., in 1888. She was born in that state 
and died at their Montana ranch in May, 1899, 
leaving four interesting daughters, Gladine, 
Glad)s, Elizabeth and Mary. Mr. Lewis was 
'married again in 1901, at Minneapolis, Minn., to 
Miss Anna B. Anderson, who was born in that city 
in 1 87 1. 



BRUCE LE'VERICH.— Of thrifty, sturdy and 
enterprising Holland ancestry, whose good 
qualities have been perpetuated in him, the subject 
of this review is one of the progressive and repre- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1119 



sentative citizens of Carbon county, JMont., where 
his home is a model of beauty and good taste, with 
complete equipment and every consideration for the 
comfort of its inmates. In fact he has one of the 
best improved places in the county. Air. Leverich 
was born in Cedar county, Iowa., March 4, 1848, 
a son of Ira and Jane (Morgan) Leverich, the 
former a native of New York and the latter of 
West Virginia. The paternal grandfather, James 
Leverich, emigrated from Holland in Colonial times 
and settled in New York state, from which the 
father of Bruce Leverich removed with his family 
to Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, finally making a per- 
manent home in Iowa, where he engaged in farm- 
ing. On the outbreak of hostilities he entered the 
service of his country as a soldier in the Black 
Hawk war. He also took an active interest in pub- 
lic afifairs, and was the choice of his party for vari- 
ous political offices. 

Bruce Leverich spent his school days in Iowa, 
remaining on the homestead until 1868, when he 
went to Cass county, Mo., and engaged in farm- 
ing. In 1872 he came to Montana and spent two 
years in Gallatin county. At the end of that time 
he returned to Missouri, and remained until 1882. 
Cpon his return to Montana, he located about five 
miles south of Bozeman, and there remained until 
1893, carrying on a profitable business in farming, 
dairying, etc. In 1893 he sold out and located be- 
low Red Lodge, but after a year removed to the 
ranch which is now his home, two miles above 
Joliet, where he has since been engaged in farming 
and stockraising with excellent results. All his 
land is under irrigation and it yields fine crops of 
grain and hay. He has planted a large orchard, 
and some of the trees are in good bearing order. 
The small fruits are also yielding excellent returns. 

Mr. Leverich was united in marriage with Miss 
Carrie Hinote. a native of Indiana, on January 30, 
1877. She was the daughter of Asa and Linda 
( Abel ) Hinote, the former a native of Tennessee 
and the latter of Virginia. Mrs. Leverich's grand- 
father. Philip Hinote. was born and reared in Scot- 
land, but came to America as a young man and set- 
tled in Tennessee. The grandfather, Philip Hinote, 
was a gallant soldier in the Revolution, serving 
seven years, and Mrs. Leverich has a number of 
buckles and other relics of his service. She and 
Mr. Leverich have four children : Frank E., Ray- 
mond, Bertha and William Edgar. Fraternally 
our subject is a member of the Fraternal Union of 
America. 



MARTIN H. LUTHER.— No name is perhaps 
more prominently associated with the prog- 
ress and substantial upbuilding of the city of 
Great Falls than that of Air. Luther. He is a 
worthy representative of the sons of the German 
fatherland, which has contributed in so large a 
measure to the worthy and progressive citizenship 
of our national commonwealth, and was born in 
Selchow, Posen, Germany, on October 2^, 1857. 
His father, Gottfried Luther, was born in the same 
town in 1807, where his death occurred in 1883. 
He was a farmer and descended from old German 
stock. His wife bore the maiden name of Albertine 
Karkuschki, and was born at Alinettensruh, in 
Brandenburg, Germany, in 1837, and died in Sel- 
chow in 1875. Her marriage to Air. Luther was 
solemnized at that place in iS^O. 

Alartin H. Luther, at the early age of fourteen 
years, laid aside his text books to learn the trade of 
brick mason, at which he worked in his home town 
for about two years and in 1873 1^^ emigrated to 
America. He located in Wisconsin, spending one 
year in Baraboo and three years at Wausau, whence 
he came to Fargo, N. I)., in 1879, where until 
1888 he was engaged in farming arid working at 
his trade. He, however, made a prospecting tour 
through the mining districts of Washington and 
Idaho, and in 1888 located in Great Falls, where he 
erected the row of brick buildings on the west 
side of Second street, extending from First avenue 
north one-half block to the alley. This property 
still remains in his possession. In 1891 ^[r. Luther 
erected the first brick building in Neihart, a fine 
block 50x60 feet in dimensions, which he sold to 
L. S. AlcClure in the fall of 1900. 

From August 16, 1900, to February 12, 1901, Mr. 
Luther was engaged in the erection of an elegant 
brick block on First avenue and Fourth street in 
Great Falls. This building is known as Luther's 
Hall, and is modern in every respect, being 50x150 
feet in dimensions and with two stories and base- 
ment. It is one of the largest and most substantial 
buildings in the business section of the city and a 
credit alike to Great Falls and to its builder. The 
ground floor is utilized for commercial purposes, 
while the entire upper story is a magnificent hall or 
auditorium, supplying a long recognized want in the 
city. During his residence in Great Falls Mr. Luther 
has been engaged in merchandising, and has had 
extensive operations in real estate and in mining 
property. He is far-sighted and discriminating in 
his methods, and his success has been attained by 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



worthy means, his absolute integrity of purpose 
being recognized by all. 

In politics he gives his support to the Democratic 
party, but the demands placed upon his time by his 
business interests have prevented his active partici- 
pation in poHtics. On April 7, 1892, in Bozeman, 
Mr. Luther was united in matrimony to Miss Amelia 
Welke, daughter of August Welke, a farmer and 
blacksmith of Selchow, Germany. Their children 
are, with dates of birth, Louisa Hettie, January 12, 
1893, Erna Emilia, January 28, 1895, Gretchen 
Henrietta, October 27, 1896, Ella Marie, August 
21, 1898, and Herman Martin, October 19, 1900. 



HON. THOMAS H. CARTER.— The subject of 
this sketch was the last delegate from the ter- 
ritory, the first representative in congress from 
the state and the first person elected to serve a 
full term in the senate of the United States from 
Montana. In reviewing the life of this remarkable 
man from his early youth, one cannot be otherwise 
than profoundly impressed with the power and 
strength of his mind amid those innumerable ob- 
stacles and early environments which to many 
would have proved an unsurmountable barrier. 
Emerging by degrees from obscurity, each step 
in his upward career brought him more and 
more into notice, until he at last reached an 
exalted stand in the estimation of his fellow citi- 
zens. A man of action, a forceful and effective 
director of opinion, a statesman of proved ability 
and a lawyer of high prestige, it can properly be 
said that much of his grand achievements sprang 
from his untiring application and indomitable cour- 
age. This is true of all successful men, as by no 
other means can great results be obtained in any 
sphere of endeavor. 

Hon. Thomas H. Carter, ex-United States sena- 
tor for the state of Montana, was born in Scioto 
county, Ohio, October 30, 1854. He accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Illinois in 1865, in 
which state he received his early educational train- 
ing in the public schools. He grew up under the 
sturdy discipline of the farm, and his initial in- 
dividual efforts were made in connection with the 
great basic art of agriculture. After working on 
the farm for a time he engaged in railroad work 
and later taught school. But a man of so marked 
individuality was not dilatory in formulating def- 
inite plans for his future life work, and thus it was 



that Mr. Carter determined to prepare himself 
for that profession which, more than any other, 
has touched the public life and welfare of the na- 
tion. At Burlington, Iowa, he began the study of 
law and so persistently applied himself that he soon 
became eligible for admission to the bar. He 
began the practice of his profession in Burling- 
ton, and his distinctive abilities soon gained him 
recognition. 

The year 1882 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Car- 
ter in the city of Helena, which has since con- 
tinued to be his home. Upon arriving in Hel- 
ena Senator Carter at once entered upon the prac- 
tice of law, soon securing a representative client- 
age and making for himself a place among the 
leaders of the bar which has ever lent dignity 
and honor to Montana. Eventually he associated 
himself with John B. Clayberg, and the firm 
of Carter & Clayberg obtained and for many years 
held prestige as one of the foremost legal alli- 
ances in the state, controlling a business of wide 
scope and importance. When Mr. Carter was 
elected to congress. Judge N. ^^^ McConnnell be- 
came associated with the firm. Deeply interested 
in all that concerned the welfare of the state, Mr. 
Carter was soon drawn into the field of politics, 
wherein he has won distinguished honors and has, 
in turn, honored the state which called upon him 
to serve in positions of trust and responsibility. 
He was promptly accorded and has steadily main- 
tained the leadership of the Republican party in 
Montana. In 1888 he was nominated by his party 
as candidate for delegate in congress, this being 
the year prior to the admission of the territory 
to the sisterhood of states. The campaign was one 
of the most notable in the annals of Montana's 
political history. Theretofore the territory had 
elected only one Republican delegate to congress, 
and the victory achieved by the subject of this re- 
view was consequently all the more distinctive. 
His opponent was Hon. W. A. Clark, of Butte, 
whom he defeated by a majority of 5,126 votes 
after a vigorous and exciting campaign. Mon- 
tana was admitted to statehood the following year 
and this extinguished the office of territorial dele- 
gate ; but in the first state Republican conven- 
tion Mr. Carter was unanimously made the stan- 
dard bearer of his party, on this occasion as the 
candidate for full congressional honors. At the 
ensuing election he defeated the Democratic can- 
didate, Hon. Martin Macginnis, by a majority of 
1,648, thus winning the distinction of having been 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



the last territorial delegate and the first to rep- 
resent the new state in the national house of rep- 
resentatives. Of his work in this connection an- 
other publication has spoken as follows : "Mr. 
Carter gained a national reputation in the Fifty- 
first congress by his indefatigable work upon the 
floor of the house, and by those qualities of lead- 
ership which became manifest from the moment 
he entered the sphere of political action. His tire- 
less efforts and his able appeals to the committees 
of the house in behalf of the various interests 
of his state soon gave him a foremost place among 
the men who command the respect and confidence 
of that body." His executive ability was so clearly 
recognized that he was chosen secretary of the 
Republican congressional committee during the 
campaign of 1890, and, while engaged in the duties 
of this office, the Republican party of Montana 
assembled in convention at Butte and for the third 
time nominated Mr. Carter as their candidate 
for congress. This was done against his advice 
and contrary to his wishes. His work on the con- 
gressional committee detained him in Washing- 
ton until near election time, when he returned 
to his district to assume, for the third time in two 
years, the brunt of political conflict. The Demo- 
cratic party had in the meantime nominated Hon. 
W. W. Dixon, of Butte, as Mr. Carter's opponent. 
The absence of the Republican candidate left the 
field to Mr. Dixon and his aggressive supporter, 
Hon. Marcus Daly, with the result that Mr. Car- 
ter was defeated by something less than 300 votes. 
Upon the expiration of his term in congress, 
in the spring of 1891, President Harrison appointed 
Mr. Carter commissioner of the general land of- 
fice in Washington, and he ably discharged the 
duties of this important trust until July i, 1892, 
when he resigned to assume the arduous work 
of another ofifice to which he had been chosen, that 
of chairman of the Republican national commit- 
tee, holding that important position for a period of 
four years, and being succeeded by Hon. Marcus A. 
Hanna, of Ohio. His efforts in that exacting 
position are now a matter of history, and it is 
acknowledged that he held the various political 
forces well in hand, marshaling the same with pre- 
cision and directing every movement and maneuver 
with consummate skill, thereby adding fresh 
laurels to his fame as a public man. At 
the close of the campaign of 1892 Mr. Carter re- 
turned to Helena and resumed the active practice 
of his profession ; but the people of the state had 



too profound a recognition of his signal eligibil- 
ity and talents to permit him to remain long in 
private life, and in 1895 he was urged by his ad- 
mirers as candidate for the senate of the United 
States. The ensuing campaign was a spirited 
one and political enthusiasm ran high in Mon- 
tana, but the result was favorable to Mr. Carter, 
the honor accorded him being a fitting crown 
to his brilliant career as representative of the in- 
terests of his state. In the senate Mr. Carter 
assumed a position of no less relative importance 
than he had in the house. He was an active work- 
ing member, as a matter of course, for Senator 
Carter is a man of action. During his senatorial 
term he served on a number of the most import- 
ant committees, among which may be noted, the 
committees on census (of which he was chairman), 
military affairs, postofifices and post roads, public 
lands, territories, forest reservations and protec- 
tion of game, and appropriations. Aside from 
these there were others of scarcely less importance. 
His brilliant and long sustained efforts in opposi- 
tion to the passage of the river and harbor bill 
at the close of the Fifty-sixth congress will ever 
be remembered in the annals of our political his- 
tory. It is an undoubted fact that the defeat of this 
extravagant measure was due to him. It is un- 
necessary to recapitulate the forceful and cogent 
argimients which he brought to bear, for the same 
are a matter of record and are duly exploited 
in the public press of the nation, gaining to him 
the endorsement of a great majority of the people 
of the country, irrespective of political affiliations, 
and stamping him as one of the zealous advo- 
cates of a true economy in the administration of 
public affairs. The contest was a notable one and 
Senator Carter scored, without fear or favor, a 
measure that was fostered by corporate greed 
and represented an unwise expenditure of public 
funds. His term in the senate expired on March 
4, 1 901, but not yet was he permitted to return 
to the quiet duties of private life, for in that year 
President McKinley on his own motion appointed 
him commissioner of the St. Louis Exposition, 
and upon the assembling of the board of com- 
missioners he was chosen president and is now 
giving his attention to the duties involved. 

A summing up of the career of Senator Carter 
has concisely been given in the following words: 
"His rise as a lawyer and as a public character has 
l^een phenomenal. He was achieving marked suc- 
cess in his profession when called to the field of 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



politics in 1888, and from that time onward his par- 
ticipation in state and national affairs has devel- 
oped in him a high order of statecraft and gained 
for him a reputation as a writer, orator and leader 
of party organization and sentiment such as is 
rarely given to men in so brief an experience 
in public affairs. He is fertile in expedient and 
meets every contingency with a full measure of 
equality. His originality, condensation and force 
of expression; his active, aggressive and sanguine 
temperament; his powers of physical endurance; 
his tact, sagacity and judgment and his cordial 
and unaffected intercourse with men are the in- 
strumental factors of his success in public life ; 
while as a lawyer he is in the forefront of his 
profession." 

In 1886 Mr. Carter was married to Miss Ellen 
L. Galen, daughter of Hugh and Matilda Galen. 
Mrs. Carter is possessed of musical and literary 
talent and is a social favorite. Of this union two 
sons have been born, John G., born in January, 
i8qi. and Hugh, born in August, 1892. 



)OHN C. LEHSOU is one of the enterprising 
and successful farmers and fruit growers of the 
beautiful Missoula valley, and also merits con- 
sideration as one of the pioneers of the state, with 
whose industrial activities he has been identified 
for a long term of years. He is a native of Hol- 
stein, Germany, born on April 3, 1840, the son 
of Henry and Magdalena (Ehlers) Lehsou, who 
were born and passed their entire lives in Hol- 
stein, the father devoting his attention to farm- 
ing. Of their three sons and three daughters, John 
C. is the only child in the United States. He was 
reared on the parental homestead, receiving his 
education in the excellent public schools of his na- 
tive land, where he was an agriculturist until his 
twenty-fifth year, when he started for the United 
States, where he arrived in May, 1865. He lo- 
cated at Davenport, Iowa, for nine months, then 
passed three months in Omaha, after which he 
went to Nebraska City, and entered the employ 
of Messrs. Owens & Fry as a driver of freighting 
outfits, and for them drove an ox team to the Bit- 
ter Root valley of Montana. The party came by 
the Bozeman cutoff, and they had trouble with 
Sioux Indians in Dakota, losing three men and all 
of their thirteen horses. They finally arrived at 
Fort Owens, bringing their loads of groceries and 



mining tools. Upon arrivmg in this state Mr. 
Lehsou took up a ranch at the mouth of Bear 
Mouth canyon and opened a stage station which 
he conducted for eighteen months, after which he 
turned his attention to mining, but was unsuccess- 
ful. He then continued mming at Burton until 
1892, here meeting success. 

Mr. Lehsou came to Missoula county in 1892, 
and established himself on his present ranch, pur- 
chasing 320 acres of fine farming land, which 
he has improved and developed into a model ranch, 
the land being fertile and all available for cultiva- 
tion. He has also devoted special attention to 
the raising of fruits of excellent varieties, hav- 
ing set out fine orchards, fully realizing the great 
values to be ultimately derived from this branch 
of ranch industry. While a resident of Beartown, 
Granite county, Mr. Lehsou was for four years 
postmaster at that office. In politics he gives his al- 
legiance to the Republican party, and fraternally 
has been identified with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows since 1875. Mr. Lehsou still retains an 
interest in placer mines in Bear gulch, and is one 
of the principal stockholders in the Western Mon- 
tana National Bank, of Missoula, of which institu- 
tion he has been vice-president since the annual 
meeting of the stockholders in 1900. He is a man 
of business and executive ability and his connection 
with this monetary institution can not fail to advance 
its interests and its prestige. On January 18, 1873, 
Mr. Lehsou was united in marriage to Miss Dora 
Rusch, who like himself was born in Holstein, 
Germany, and is the daughter of Drees and 'Cath- 
erine M. (Vohr) Rusch, who passed their lives in 
Germany, three of their daughters and one son be- 
coming residents of the United States. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lehsou have two sons, Henry W. and Emil C. 
The latter resides in the city of Missoula, and 
Henry W. is foreman in a quartzmill at Garnet. 



F FERDINAND LEIMBACH.— A product of the 
sturdy yeomanry of Germany, the subject of 
this sketch has exhibited in his career and business 
success all the reliable and productive qualities for 
which his race is distinguished. He was born in 
Philadelphia, Pa., on March 19, 1873, the son of 
Frederick and Elisa (Merker) Leimbach, both na- 
tives of Germany, who were married, however, in 
Philadelphia, where the father was in business. 
About 1877 the father removed to Colorado, locat- 




Frank Lewis 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 123 



ing in Denver, where he remained for a year, when 
he removed to Salt Lake City, Utah. In that city 
he spent two years in business, but being burned 
out with heavy loss, he afterwards came to Mon- 
tana, and locating at Butte, engaged in the hotel 
business, in which he is still engaged. His family 
consists of four children now living, another which 
blessed the union having died some years ago. 

Ferdinand, our immediate subject, spent his school 
days in Butte, and remained with his father for 
some years after leaving school. He became a cigar 
maker and also learned house painting, but worked 
at neither craft as he preferred freighting, and min- 
ing, spending two years in the Butte copper mines. 
Feeling an intense longing for an outdoor life, 
he removed to Carbon county and located on his 
present ranch on Rocky Fork, near Carbonado, and 
began a profitable business in stockraising. Later 
he conducted a sawmill in addition to his ranch- 
ing, being joined in both enterprises by his brother 
Ernest, in 1896. In 1899 he was married to Miss 
Mabel Chapman, a native of \\"yoming, and two 
years later he and his brother dissolved partner- 
ship, dividing the stock they had on hand, Mr. 
Leimbach retaining his former ranch and his 
brother locating on one he had taken up. In his 
cattle operations our subject makes a specialty of 
Herefords and shorthorns, and has been successful 
in the rearing of both breeds. His tendency is to 
cut out of his herds everything but absolute 
thoroughbreds, and he is making good progress to- 
ward this consummation. His ranch is well irri- 
gated, and improved with excellent buildings, 
fences and other appliances. He has on it a fine 
residence and a large stone barn. He is progressive 
and up to the times in business, public-spirited and 
liberal in his views touching matters of interest to 
the community, and genial and companionable so- 
cially — one of the representative men of this sec- 
tion, and held in the highest esteem wherever he 
is known. 



FRANK LIPPERT is one of the most enterpris- 
ing and wide awake stockmen in Broadwater 
county, Mont. He was born in Cuyahoga county, 
Ohio, on March 4, 1853. His parents were John 
and Mary (Wilkes) Lippert, natives of Germany, 
who first settled in this country near Buffalo, N. Y., 
and later removed to Cuyahoga county, Ohio, 
within nine miles of Cleveland, where the father 
engaged in farming. Young Lippert received his 



education in the excellent schools in the vi- 
cinity of Cleveland and, in June, 1871, accompanied 
by his sister, Mrs. Norton, now living near Town- 
send, started for Montana by the Union Pacific 
Railway to Ogden, Utah, and thence 400 miles 
across country by wagon train. The trip was 
pleasant and was accomplished in safety, as the 
Indians were then peaceable. The party came direct 
to Missouri valley, and at once engaged in the 
profitable business of ranching. In 1879 and 1880 
Mr. Lippert carried on freighting from Dillon to 
Helena and Fort Benton. 

On November 23, 1882, Mr. Lippert was mar- 
ried to Miss Rose Young, of York, Dane county, 
Wis., who was born on April 16, 1861. She was 
the daughter of Abel Young, of Oxford, England, 
who, after making several trips across the Atlantic, 
and one cruise in the Pacific on which he visited 
Australia, located in Wisconsin and engaged in 
farming and eventually removed to Missouri valley. 
John Lippert having died in 1870, his son Frank 
came to Missouri valley and there made his home. 
He took up his present homestead in 1881, and has 
since made it his residence. It is well equipped with 
all conveniences for the business of cattle raising, 
and is in a most eligible location. Fraternally he 
is a member of the United Workmen. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Lippert have been born three children, Etta 
Marie, Mabel, Dean and William Pierce. 



F* RANK LEWIS is one of the most enterpris- 
ing and successful business men of Belt, Cas- 
cade county, where he operates extensive coal 
mines. He is a native of Norwich, Conn., where he 
was born on St. Valentine's day, 1853. His father, 
Joseph P. Lewis, was born in the same city, where 
he is now living retired, being well advanced in 
age. During his active life he was a stone con- 
tractor. The maiden name of Frank Lewis' mother 
was Abbie Church, who was born at Montville 
on the Thames river, Conn. Her marriage to Mr. 
Lewis was solemnized in Norwich, where she died 
in 1854. The family comes of good old Revolu- 
tionary stock, and both grandfathers were both 
active participants in the war of the Revolution. 
His paternal grandfather was a freighter and con- 
tractor in Connecticut, and the maternal grand- 
father was a captain of a whaling vessel for 3'ears. 
Frank Lewis began his education in the public 
schools of Scotland, Windham county, Conn., but 



124 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



at the early age of twelve years he went to Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., and was for three years employed in a 
store, in the meanwhile attending night schools. 
In 1868 he located in Willimantic, Conn., where he 
was in the employ of Amos Bill until 187&, when 
he made his way to Bakersfield, Cal, where he 
was engaged in herding sheep until the fall of 1879, 
when he brought 13,000 head of sheep for Hedge 
& Bryant from California to Helena, Mont., where 
he disposed of them for $3.00 per head. The same 
year he located at Box Elder, in Choteau county, 
where he bought 5,500 head of sheep, locating on 
a squatter's claim and there remaining for two 
winters, during the last being associated with Sam- 
uel Dickey, to whom he sold his interest in 1881. 
He then went to Cora creek. Cascade county, and 
established a stage line between that place and 
Barker and Billings. He gave his attention to this 
line for two years, and in 1883 made a trip to 
Alaska, where he engaged in prospecting and min- 
ing for one year. Upon his return he located at 
Kibbey for a year, and the two years he was em- 
ployed by J. T. Armington at Armington, and for 
him he drove large bands of sheep through to St. 
Paul, returning with cattle. The next two years he 
engaged in stockraising on shares, being still as- 
sociated with Mr. Armington. In 1892 Mr. Lewis 
located the Lewis coal mine at Belt, and he has 
developed and continuously operated the same, 
from which he has shipped an average of 100 tons 
per day to the B. & M. smelter, in Great Falls. 
He was also the proprietor of the Bateman Hotel, 
in Belt, from 1892 until 1901. He is a Democrat in 
]3olitics and in 1893 was registering agent at Belt. 
He is a man of marked business capacity and ster- 
ling character, enjoying uniform respect in the 
community. In Belt, on April 13, 1890, occurred 
the marriage of Mr. Lewis to Miss Susie Dockery, 
a lady of great executive ability, who was born at 
Council Blufifs, Iowa. They are the parents of four 
children, Joseph (deceased), Frank Thomas, Fred 
Church and William Russell Lewis, 



BENJAMIN MacDONALD.— One of the most 
tragic and inexcusable events in Scottish his- 
tory is the bloody massacre of Glencoe in 1692, in 
which the MacDonalds of that wild region were 
brutally murdered by the order of an English 
king for their loyalty to the unhappy Stuart dy- 
nasty, to which they believed they owed allegiance. 



It is the ofttold tale of persecution for opinion's 
sake. A few of the unfortunate clan escaped, and 
among them were the ancestors of Benjamin Mac- 
Donald, of Bridger, manager of the mercantile 
department of the Bridger Coal Company. They 
owned a large tract of land there, and after the 
troublous times passed returned to occupy it. It 
was in the possession of tne family until the death 
of Mr. MacDonald's grandfather, when it passed 
into the ownership of Lord Strathcona, of Canada. 
Mr. MacDonald was born at Walla Walla, Wash., 
November 23, 1844, the son of Archibald and 
Jane (Klyne) MacDonald, the former of whom 
was born at Glencoe, Scotland, in 1790, and the 
latter in Canada in 1810. The father came to 
America in 1814, having been educated as a civil 
engineer at one of the best colleges in his native 
land, from which he was graduated with honors, 
being at the time in the service of the Hudson 
Bay Company. Lord Selkirk, who was governor 
of that company at the time, being well pleased 
with Mr. MacDonald's capacity and agreeable man- 
ners, attached him to his personal service as private 
secretary and employed him also in writing up a 
description of the altitudes, general topography 
and climate of the country. The sketches thus 
prepared were extensively used by engineers in 
locating the Canadian Pacific route. After a few 
years service in the capacities named Mr. Mac- 
Donald was promoted to the position of chief 
trader and stationed at Fort Langley, near the 
mouth of the Rogers river, and later was promoted 
to the position of chief factor and stationed at 
Fort Vancouver, near the mouth of the Columbia 
river. Sometime after he was removed to Fort 
Colville, where he occupied the same position, and 
cultivated, about 4,000 acres of land in the interest 
of the company. He also built and conducted a 
gristmill and raised stock, having 400 to 500 milk 
cows and a large number of hogs. He made his 
post the supply station of the company for many 
years, portions of the suppHes being furnished for 
the Hudson Bay posts in Idaho, Montana and 
Washington. In 1844 he retired from active busi- 
ness, built an elegant residence on the banks of 
the Ottawa, named it Glencoe and made it his 
home until his death, in 1851, at the age of sixty. 
His family consisted of thirteen sons and one 
daughter. Benjamin was the twelfth son. He re- 
ceived his early education at Carillon Academy, 
on the Ottawa, which he followed with a course 
at McGill University, and after completing this 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



[125 



he went to Fraser river, B. C, and engaged in 
mining. In company with R. D. Cameron and 
his brother he located the celebrated Cameron 
claims on William creek in Caribou, but sold them 
too soon, being deceived b)' one of the partners, 
who concealed the true character of the diggings. 
He then bought a mule train and engaged in 
freighting. In 1864 he joined the stampede to 
Boise, Idaho, but not meeting with success went 
in the fall to the Kootenai country and wintered at 
Fort Colville, where his cousin, Angus MacDon- 
ald, was chief factor, having succeeded Mr. Mac- 
Donald's father twenty years previously. In 1866 
he went up the Columbia river as far as the big 
bend, mining and prospecting, and returned to the 
fort to winter, but went back in the spring and 
was moderately successful. He invested in a 
steamboat named the Forty-nine, and in the fall 
she sank. His next venture was in the stock busi- 
ness on Big Lake at the Okanagan river, which he 
conducted for a year and then sold out and joined 
the stampede to Cedar creek, near Missoula, in 
which he was one of the successful seekers. He 
wintered at the Flathead Hudson Bay post. 

The next year he sold his interests in Montana 
and returned to Canada, engaging in general mer- 
chandising at St. Andrews, Quebec, where, on 
August 14, 1872, he was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Pyke, of Hudson-on-Ottawa, a daughter of Rev. 
James Pyke, of Warwickshire, England, and Eliza- 
beth (McTavish) Pyke, of Scotland. Mrs. Mac- 
Donald's grandfather, George Pyke, came to Can- 
ada from England and became chief justice of the 
province. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald have three 
children living: Elizabeth Klyne, now the wife of 
F. C. Salter, eastern general freight agent for the 
Northern Pacific Railroad in New York ; John 
Angus, living at home, is in the employ of the 
Bridger Coal Company ; Arthur T. is a student at 
Ann Arbor University, Michigan ; another son, 
James A., is deceased. Mr. McDonald remained 
in Canada until 1879, when he removed on account 
of ill health to Denver, Colo., and there was en- 
gaged in merchandising and coal mining for seven- 
teen years. He was very successful until the panic 
of 1893, when he met with serious reverses. In 
1896 he took a position in the employ of W. A. 
Clark and for the next four years was located in 
Butte, having charge of the John Caplis Company. 
In 1900 he took charge of the mercantile depart- 
ment of the Bridger Coal Company, a position 
which he still holds. In fraternal relations he is 



connected with the order of Freemasons. An in- 
cident in his life worthy of note is that on the oc- 
casion of his brother's death, Alexander McDon- 
ald, chief factor of the Hudson Bay Company, in 
1874, he made the quickest trip ever made in the 
northwest, traveling 1,600 miles in twenty- four 
days by canoe and portaging, from Lake Superior 
to Hudson Bay and return, having reached Moose 
Factory on Hudson Bay a few days after his 
brother's death. 



ALEXANDER J. McKAY, one of the leading 
merchants and a territorial pioneer of Mon- 
tana, resides at Whitehall, Jefferson county. He 
was born at Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, on April 
10, 1857. His parents were Alexander and Annie 
(McLeod) McKay, the former of County Pictou 
and the latter of Cape Breton, N. S. The father 
is still living at the age of seventy-three, engaged 
in farming. The paternal grandfather, Donald Mc- 
Kay, came from Scotland as a representative and 
colporteur of the Presbyterian church in 1809. Al- 
exander J. McKay received his education in the 
public schools at Cape Breton, but he had to make 
his own way in the world and the west appeared to 
ofTer superior advantages to him, and in 1878, as 
soon as he had attained his majority, he removed 
to Eureka, Nev., where he passed one year in min- 
ing, and then re-located at Frisco, Utah. Here he 
was industriously employed in the smelter for two 
years, locating at Wood river, Idaho, where for six 
months he actively engaged in business, and then 
returned to Frisco, LTtah. 

Three months later he was in Butte, Mont., 
and for a year and a half he was in the saw mill 
business there. He then removed to Missoula, 
where he passed an active and profitable year and 
went to Winnipeg, Manitoba, for a few months. 
This was a money-making era, and Mr. McKay 
with rare good judgment improved every oppor- 
tunity and was substantially benefited. Going to 
Granville Bay, on the north shore of Lake Super- 
ior, he engaged in contracting for the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, and here also he was financially 
successful. After eighteen months he returned to 
his old home in Nova Scotia, where he bought a 
farm, with the intention of there establishing his 
permanent home. But four months later he was 
farther west than ever before and in the heart of 
the Cascade mountains. Here he secured a con- 



126 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



tract on the Northern Pacific which resulted dis- 
astrously to him. Returning to Butte, Mont., he 
worked in the smelter for two years and then 
he was in business for himself until 1895, selling 
out and removing to Whitehall, Jefferson county, 
where he now resides, and where he has met with 
most flattering success as the senior member of 
the extensive mercantile house of the McKay- 
Carmichael Company, the ramifications of whose 
business extend over a considerable extent of 
country. Mr. McKay has made a number of im- 
portant investments in mining properties and has 
two mines which he is developing with good prom- 
ise of large returns. On August 3, 1893, Mr. 
McKay was united in marriage to Miss Maggie 
McCarthy, a native of New Biunswick. Politically 
he afifiliates with the Republican party in whose 
interest he is an energetic and influential worker. 
Fraternally he is a master Mason and an Odd 
Fellow. The prosperity that time has brought to 
Mr. McKay is the result of superior business sa- 
gacity, rare commercial instinct and the legitimate 
outcome of honest endeavor and high moral char- 
acter. He has won the confidence of the people 
of the community in which he resides and stands 
in high esteem. 



SAMUEL LUTZ. — Among those who have at- 
~. tained a due measure of prosperity through 
taking advantage of the natural resources of Mon- 
tana is the subject of this review. Mr. Lutz is a 
native of the old Keystone state, having been 
born in Butler county, Pa., on the 15th of March, 
1846, a son of Daniel and Tena Lutz, who were 
likewise born in Pennsylvania, where they passed 
their entire lives, the father devoting his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits, while in politics he 
was a Democrat. Both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the German Reformed church and folk 
of sterling character. All of their eleven children 
are living except Tena, Kate and William. The 
mother passed away in 1862 and the father in 
1870. Their surviving children are Mary, Isaac, 
Elizabeth, Samuel, Joseph, Solomon, Henry and 
Daniel. Of the number four reside in Montana. 
Samuel Lutz, our immediate subject, received 
little schooling, as he was compelled to depend 
upon his own resources at an early age. He 
found employment at farm work, and his first 
wages were fixed at $2.50 per month. As he waxed 
strong in stature and in capacity for labor he se- 



cured increase in wages, and at seventeen years he 
became identified with stable work. After devoting 
his attention to this and other lines of employ- 
ment in Pennsylvania for about three years, he 
removed to Illinois, and rented a farm of 160 
acres for a year, but securing so unsatisfactory 
returns that he discontinued his lease, and, in 1868, 
removed to McDonough county, where he was em- 
ployed in stable work for two years. He next 
located in Leavenworth, Kan., for one year, and 
then went to Salt Lake City, where he soon turned 
his attention to mining, in which enterprise good 
success attended his efforts, continued in Utah for 
four years. He then went to Tulare county, Cal., 
and drove a band of sheep east to Utah, the trip 
occupying eighteen months. He passed the win- 
ter in Utah and in the spring came to Montana 
with sheep, locating in the Smith River valley in 
1877, as foreman of a sheep ranch. A year later 
Mr. Lutz engaged in freighting, receiving $50 per 
month for eighteen months, and then conducted 
the same enterprise on his own responsibil- 
ity until 1882. Two years previously (in 1880) he 
had located a homestead on Trout creek, in Fergus 
county, the same comprising 160 acres. Selling 
his interests here, in 1881, he located a home- 
stead one mile west of Garneill, and has since 
added desert and pre-emption claims, and has now 
a total area of 400 acres. Somewhat more than half 
of the property is now available for cultivation, 
but Mr. Lutz gives his principal attention to the 
raising of good cattle and horses. In politics he is 
a stanch Republican, and fraternally a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America. 

On March 7, 1887, Mr. Lutz was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sarah Schaffer, who was born in 
Butler county. Pa., the daughter of George and 
Sarah Schafifer, who passed their lives in Penn- 
sylvania, where the father was in the sawmill and 
lumber business. He died in 1894, his wife having 
passed away in 1889. Both were members of the 
German Reformed church. Of thei'- twelve chil- 
dren all are living except three. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lutz are members of the Methodist church and 
highly esteemed in the community. 



PETER MacDONALD, the efficient city jailor 
of Great Falls, comes of good old Scottish 
stock and has many of its characteristics. He was 
born in Franklin county, N. Y., on October 6, 
1853, the son of Allen MacDonald, a native of 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 127 



Inverness, Scotland, where he was born in 1816, 
and, coming to the United States in 1828, he lo- 
cated in New York, where he was engaged in 
merchandising at various points until 1854, when 
he removed to County Glengarry, Canada, where 
he was a merchant until his death, in October, 
1865. The maiden name of his wife was Sarah 
MacDonald. She was born in Inverness in 1826, 
and her marriage to Mr. McDonald was solem- 
nized in Franklin county, N. Y., in 1849, ^"d her 
death occurred in County Glengarry, Canada, in 
1885. 

Peter MacDonald was educated in the public 
.schools of Glengarry, and the academy at Alex- 
andria, Ontario, until he was fifteen years old, 
when he was employed about six years as clerk 
in a mercantile establishment at Lancaster, On- 
tario, and in 1874 enlisted in the mounted police 
of Montreal, serving for six years in the North- 
west Territory. In 1879 he came over into Mon- 
tana, entering the service of I. G. Baker & Co. in 
their general store, and being with this firm during 
the building of Fort Assinniboine. From there he 
removed to Butte, was employed in a grocery 
for two years, and in March, 1887, he came to 
Great Falls. 

|Iere he engaged in the express transfer, busi- 
ness, his outfit being known as express wagon No. 
I, and in this connection he handled the transfer 
business for the Wells-Fargo and American Ex- 
press Companies for two years. The succeeding 
two years Mr. MacDonald was with Wetzel & Co., 
wholesale liquor dealers, and in 1891 he was ap- 
pointed a member of the city police force, serving 
one year, while in 1892 he was elected constable, 
serving in this capacity until the close of 1894. 
From 1895 to 1897 he was deputy sheriflf of Cas- 
cade county, was thereafter clerk in the Milwaukee 
house, and since the spring of 1900 has been in- 
cumbent of the office of city jailor, giving careful 
and efficient service in this position. In politics 
Mr. MacDonald is a Republican, and fraternally 
he is identified with Cataract Lodge No. 28, I. 
O. O. F., and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 
He was married on October 6, 1879, and has one 
daughter, Frances Amelia. 



PROF. THOMAS S. McALONEY, superin- 
tendent of the Montana School for the Deaf 
and Blind, located at Boulder, in Jefferson county, 
though young in years, has accomplished incal- 



culable good and has before him a most promising 
future. It is his mission to assist that class of the 
afflicted and unfortunate who are deaf, dumb and 
blind and to brighten their pathway through life. 
In this work he has been eminently successful, his 
abilities receiving the heartiest recognition in two 
countries. He was born in County Antrim, Ire- 
land, on June 26, 1869, the son of James McAloney, 
who was born in the same county in 1839 ^"d died 
there in 1880. His mother was Eliza Jane (Simp- 
son) McAloney, also a native of County Antrim 
where she still resides. In the family were four 
boys and four daughters, all of whom are educators 
of ability. James McAloney was principal of the 
Derry (Ireland) Model School for many years, 
while previously he was national school superin- 
tendent for his native county. 

Prof. T. S. McAloney, the young and progress- 
ive educator, was instructed at the model school 
taught by his father, and subsequently took a 
course at the Royal University of Ireland. He 
was then appointed a teacher in the Belfast Insti- 
tute for the Deaf and Blind, where he remained 
seven and a half years. An offer of instruction then 
came to him from the directors of the National 
Deaf-Mute College, of Washington, D. C, where 
he received a fellowship. He arrived in the United 
States in September, 1892, representing Great Brit- 
ain, having been chosen from amongst all the 
members of the profession in that country. Here 
he remained a year and was graduated in June, 
1893. Being offered a position in Bellville, On- 
tario, in the School for the Deaf, he taught there 
for one year, when he received a flattering offer 
from the Deaf and Dumb Institute at Talladega, 
Ala. This position he accepted, and here he first 
introduced the oral method of teaching the deaf. 
With this institute he remained five years as 
teacher and editor of the school paper. In 1899 
he became head teacher and assistant superintend- 
ent in the School for the Deaf, located at Danville, 
Ky., with twenty-six teachers under him. In May, 
1900, he accepted the position of superintendent of 
the Montana School for the Deaf and Blind. 

Prof. McAloney was the first to introduce into 
Montana the oral method of teaching, whereby 
the deaf are taught to read the lips and speak. He 
also introduced industrial training for the blind, 
consisting of piano tuning and repairing, ham- 
mock and carpet-weaving, typewriting, etc. He 
has also organized an orchestra for the blind. 
The attendance at the Montana School for the 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Deaf and Blind has doubled under his able and 
judicious superintendency, and its future is most 
promising. Into his work the Professor has 
thrown his rare gifts of energy and enthusiasm. 
To this country he has brought valuable attain- 
ments, and the people of Montana are to be highly 
congratulated on having secured his services. He 
is a Knight of Pythias and an Odd Fellow, having 
passed the chairs in each order. He is also a 
member of the Fraternal Mystic Circle. He was 
state treasurer of the Alabama Christian Endeavor 
Union for three terms, and was tendered the presi- 
dency of the union, but declined. He is a frequent 
contributor to educational journals and is now en- 
gaged in a special course of study under the direc- 
tion of the Indiana Central University. He was 
united in marriage on November 2, 1898, to Miss 
Mary B. Holt, daughter of Samuel D. Holt, senior 
partner in the firm of Holt, Agee & Co., wholesale 
grocers and cotton brokers, of Selma, Ala. 



HON. FRANK H. WOODY.— One of the dis- 
tinguished citizens of Montana, a gentleman 
who has exemplified her highest type of citizen- 
ship at home and given her prominence and re- 
nown abroad, is Hon. Frank H. Woody, of 
Missoula, who has the distinction of being one of 
her earliest pioneers and most capable jurists ; and 
who, after a long useful and honorable career in 
her service is now enjoying, for what must neces- 
sarily be the brief remainder of his days, the sweet 
content that comes only to private life. 

Judge Woody is a native of Chatham county, 
N. C, where he was born December 10, 1833. 
His father was of Quaker ancestry and his mother 
of Revolutionary stock. They were people of 
high character, but of moderate means, and were 
unable to give their offspring many educational 
advantages. The Judge was reared on the farm, 
and at the age of eighteen, after a rather frag- 
mentary and irregular preparation in the element- 
ary schools of the vicinity he entered New Garden 
Boarding School, now Guilford College, a Quaker 
institution located near Greensboro. Compelled 
by circumstances to leave the college at the end 
of a year he removed to the eastern part of the 
state and spent six months teaching one of the 
public schools in that section. From there, in 
1853, he went to Indiana, attended another Quaker 
school during a part of the year and taught public 



school again until the spring of 1855. Con- 
vinced by this time that the great west offered su- 
perior opportunities to young men of capacity and 
energy, he made his way to Kansas and subse- 
quently joined an overland merchant train 
bound to Great Salt Lake, and traveled with 
it to a point some distance west of old 
Fort Laramie. From there he journeyed with 
an emigrant train en route for Shoalwater bay, 
Washington territory. At Independence Rock 
on the Sweetwater river he was taken ill 
and forced to remain there for several days. 
Eventually he fell in with a party of Mormons 
on their way to Salt Lake, and he accompanied, 
them to that place, which they reached August 
15. 1855. It was a harbor of refuge for his storm- 
tossed barque, and gave him a chance to rest and 
refit, for he was sore distressed — feeble in health, 
destitute of means and seemingly alone in the 
world, but sustained by his own lofty courage and 
unyielding resolution. He remained in Utah until 
the fall of 1856, and then joined a party of men 
who were coming to the Flathead country to 
trade with the Indians. Near the middle of Oc- 
tober he arrived at Hellgate river, near where the 
city of Missoula now stands. Since that time, 
for nearly half a century, he has been a resident 
of what is the present state of Montana, con- 
tributing in large measure to make her history, 
aiding in her struggles and helping to win her 
triumphs. During the first ten years of his resi- 
dence within her borders he occupied himself with 
whatever business came his way, and in the main 
prospered at all. He freighted, mined, sold mer- 
chandise and engaged in politics. In 1866 a va- 
cancy occurring in the office of county clerk and 
recorder of Missoula county, the board of county 
commissioners appointed him to fill such vacancy, 
and at the succeeding general election he was 
chosen to the office by an almost unanimous vote. 
He held the position continuously until the fall 
of 1880, when he resisted the importunities of the 
people and declined a further tenure. During his 
tenure of the office it was consolidated with that 
of probate judge, and Mr. Woody discharged the 
duties of that position ; and in addition, was for 
eight years deputy clerk of the Second judicial 
court of the county. While occupying these offices 
and dealing necessarily with questions of law, 
he was naturally attracted toward the profession 
and began an assiduous and exhaustive prepara- 
tion for its practice. He was admitted to the bar 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



in January, 1877, by the supreme court of the 
territory, and within a remarkably short time se- 
cured a large and profitable clientage ; and so well 
was he equipped in both the theory and the prac- 
tice of the law, that he at once took rank as one 
of the ablest and most successful attorneys and 
counsellors in the whole northwest. In 1869 he 
was elected a member of the territorial legislature 
for the counties of Missoula and Deer Lodge; but 
there being some doubt of the legality of the ses- 
sion which followed he did not attend. In 1892 he 
was nominated by the Democratic party of his 
county for the office of judge of the Fourth 
judicial district of the state, and was elected over- 
two competitors by a handsome plurality. In 1896 
he was again nominated and elected by a hand- 
some majority to the same office for another term 
of four years. His record on the bench was but 
a logical sequence of his long and distinguished 
public service. It is a veritable thread of gold in the 
jurisprudence of the state, and a pleasure to the 
sight of all who know him. 

In 1871 Judge Woody was married to Miss Liz- 
zie Countryman, a native of California, daughter 
of Horace and Elizabeth Countryman, but at the 
time a resident of Missoula, where the nuptials 
were celebrated. They have one son and two 
daughters, namely: Frank, Alice M. and Flora 
P. Woody, all of whom are still living at Missoula. 

Nearly fifty years of toil and triumph for the 
state tell the story of his life. It is a record worthy 
the pride of any mortal man, and it involves a duty 
well performed in every line of work. The Judge 
has met all the due demands in every sphere, and 
by his merit dignified his guild. Every public 
office he has filled brought credit to himself and 
profit to his kind ; in legal forums he has won just 
honors and high rank ; commercial life has felt his 
potent hand in fostering and developing affairs ; 
and in social circles he has ever been an orna- 
ment, a tonic and a guide. The people he has 
served know not among them all a truer, nobler, 
manlier man. 



DAVID BLAIR McCRACKEN.— A fine speci- 
men of the sturdy Scotch race, with the char- 
acteristic energy and push of that people, David 
Blair McCracken, of Laurel, Mont., by persever- 
ance, intelligence, skill and diligence, is working 
out his own fortune and destiny in the new world 



when, if he chose, he could enjoy the luxuries of 
life in the old. He was born in Ayr, Scotland, De- 
cember 20, 1863, the son of Prof. John and Esther 
(Blair) McCracken, and grandson of Rev. Andrew 
McCracken and Sir Edward Blair, of the same 
town. His ancestors on his father's side were of 
noble ancestry and went from Norway to Scotland 
in 1218. The Blairs are among the oldest, best 
known and most famous families in Scotland. 
Their estate, known as Blarquhan, is entailed and 
has been in the family for many centuries, and their 
lineage is recorded in Burke's Peerage. The 
grandfather McCracken was a preacher in the old 
established church until the disruption in 1843, in 
which he was a leader, and after that he became a 
leader in the Free Church of Scotland, and re- 
mained one until his death in 1872. He and his 
wife, nee Wilson, were both born in 1801. She 
died in the early 'sixties. Mr. McCracken's father 
was a practicing physician until 1875, when he ac- 
cepted the professorship of physics in the Univer- 
sity of Edinburgh, which he held until liis death in 
1890, and in which he was associated with Prof. 
Mackie, LL.D., of Dublin University.. He was one 
of Scotland's leading men of letters, and received 
the degree of LL.D. from the University of Edin- 
burgh. At his death he left a family of two sons 
and one daughter. One of these sons was the Rev. 
Thomas McCracken, a distinguished divine of 
Stobhill, Edinburgh, who died in 1883. The daugh- 
ter was married to Arthur Balfour, a barrister of 
Glasgow. She died in 1882 by accident, having 
been thrown from her horse while hunting with a 
party of members of the Ayr Hunt Club. 

David Blair McCracken received his elementary 
education in the public schools of Ayr, and later 
lentered the University of Edinburgh, from which 
he was graduated in 1881 with the degrees of A. 
M., A. F., and P. F. G. K. The last is a degree in 
an agricultural course conducted in the Royal Ag- 
ricultural Hall. At the time of his graduation he 
was the youngest man who had ever been gradu- 
ated from the institution with such honors. After 
leaving the university he became land steward for 
the Marquis of Aisle, a position which placed him 
second in authority over the immense landed es- 
tates of the Marquis, which yield an income of 
$485,000 a year. Mr. McCracken held this posi- 
tion for seven years and a half. He them visited 
Canada as a commissioner and emigrant agent for 
the Dominion government, and in the discharge of 
his duties made a trip through the Canadian north- 



1130 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



west which lasted three months. At the end of 
this he returned to his former position and re- 
mained in it until 1889, when, in company with 
Walter Clififord, the second son of Lord Cliflford, 
he returned to Canada. They had large capital and 
practically unlimited backing, and locating at Star 
Buck, Manitoba, they took up a larga tract of 
land and engaged extensively in raising cattle and 
wheat. Later they formed the Roblin Milling Co., 
of Winnipeg, with mills and elevators at Winni- 
peg, Brandon, Austin and Mooseman. The finan- 
cial depression coming on soon after, this enter- 
prise proved unsuccessful and Mr. Clififord re- 
turned to Scotland. Mr. McCracken, however, 
concluded to remain in America, and came to Mon- 
tana. He passed two years at Glendive m the cat- 
tle business, then sold out and removed to a ranch 
of 320 acres in Yellowstone county, near Park 
City, where he has since been extensively engaged 
in raising cattle and also conducting a large freight- 
ing outfit. He is now (1902) making a survey for a 
ditch from the Yellowstone, which will be fifteen 
miles in length and carry a large volume of water. 
Mr. McCracken has frequently been solicited to 
return to his native land and associate himself in 
business with his former friends, but he prefers to 
remain in America and make his own way in the 
world. He is a man of resolute perseverance and 
great energy, and is winning a gratifying success 
in his operations. 



HON. JOHN MacGINNISS.— Nature is no 
laggard in her work and seldom does things 
by halves. When she has a special work to do she 
provides a man for the purpose, and when the man 
is ready for the work, if need be, she has at his 
hand the lieutenants he may require for its execu- 
tion. To Caesar she gave Mark Antony and La- 
bienus; to Napoleon, Lefebvre and Ney; to Wash- 
ington, Knox and Hamilton. And in our day, in 
a less ambitious sphere, she has given John Mac- 
Ginniss, of Butte, to Mr. Heinze, whom we have 
called elsewhere in this work one of the great 
captains of industry. Mr. MacGinniss was born 
at Homer, Iowa, October 10, 1867, and in early 
life removed to Chicago. After his graduation 
from a Chicago high school he was employed as a 
stenographer and bookkeeper in a wholesale hard- 
ware and mining supply house, and later became its 
western traveling representative, in which capacity 



he continued to serve until 1890, when he resigned 
his position, came to Montana, and was made man- 
ager of the Tuttle Manufacturing & Supply Com- 
pany, of Anaconda. He remained with this com- 
pany three years, and then removed to Butte to 
take the management of the Thompson Falls Land 
& Lumber Company. When that company sold 
out to the Bitter Root Development Company in 
1894, he entered the employ of the Montana Ore 
Purchasing Company as purchasing agent and ore 
buyer, and in 1895 was made its vice-president and 
manager. In that capacity he has aided materially 
in enlarging its powers, multiplying its resources, 
•systematizing its work, and generally promoting 
its interests. For he does not confine himself to 
office duties or matters of general adminstration, 
but, having a genius for details in large measure, 
gives to every phase and feature of the business 
his personal attention. He is familiar with all 
branches of mine and smelter work, and capable 
of performing and directing others in performing 
any part of either. In 1896 he co-operated with 
Mr. Heinze and others in the development of the 
Rossland mining district in British Columbia, and 
thereby became vice-president and assistant man- 
ager of the British Columbia Smelting and Refin- 
ing Company. This company made possible and 
helped bring about the great development of the 
mines of that country. Before the erection of its 
smelter in that section, only such ores as would 
stand transportation to Montana or Tacoma could 
be mined with profit. While connected with the 
affairs of this company he was also purchasing 
agent for the Columbia & Western Railroad, and 
was actively engaged in its construction and opera- 
tion until the Heinze interests were sold to the 
Canadian Pacific. During his career in the Can- 
adian province he had much to do with the gov- 
ernment forces in the provincial legislature, in se- 
curing rights and franchises for the railroad, and 
also with the banking interests of eastern Canada. 
The broadening and actuating effects of these 
various duties to him in new and untried fields of 
intellectual effort, have been demonstrated in his 
subsequent career in Montana politics and legisla- 
tion. Given the faculties in any line and respon- 
sibility therein educates rapidly. Mr. MacGinniss 
had the needed faculties, and his Canadian experi- 
ences and • responsibilities soon made them sub- 
servient to his will and fruitful of good results 
for the interests he had in charge. He has also 
been engaged in litigation on a scale of magnitude. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1131 



In the suit of MacGinniss & Forrester against the 
Boston & Montana Copper Company, beginning 
in 1898, the plaintiffs secured a judgment, a fee of 
$50,000 was awarded to their lawyers, and the re- 
ceiver appointed in the case was allowed fees 
amounting to $200,000 with $34,000 for expenses. 
This case has been to the supreme court oftener 
than any other in the history of Montana litigation. 
In 1901 a new suit, on much the same grounds as 
the former, was brought by Mr. MacGinnis alone. 
It is entitled MacGinniss vs. the Boston & Mon- 
tana Copper Company, and is being vigorously 
prosecuted. In addition to the interests already 
enumerated with which he is connected, Mr. Mac- 
Ginniss is vice-president of the Nipper Copper 
Mining Company, which operates the Nipper, the 
L. E. R., the Parnell and the Cora mines ; and he 
and ex-Gov. Rickards are operating the Polaris 
mine in Beaverhead county. He is a member of 
the Montana Society of Engineers, and takes great 
interest in everything practical or technical con- 
nected with mines and mining. He has been for 
years in close and direct contact with labor from 
day to day and under almost every variety of cir- 
cumstances. He has learned its needs and is in 
deep and earnest sympathy with it and in every 
forum where he has had opportunity he has cham- 
pioned the cause of the toilers in mine and smelter, 
and so vigorously and wisely that he has secured 
for them substantial benefits in legislation and 
otherwise. He was the originator of the eight- 
hour movement in their behalf, and as a member 
of the Miners' Union committee did such effective 
work that both Mr. Heinze and Senator Clark 
agreed to an eight-hour day for the workmen, as 
announced at the twenty-second annual meeting 
of the Butte Miners' Union at the Butte opera 
house on June 13, 1900. This movement resulted 
in the success, at the election of 1900, of the Demo- 
cratic-Labor legislative ticket, on which Mr. Mac- 
Ginniss was a candidate, and the enactment of a 
suitable law on the subject at the ensuing session 
of the legislature. A resolution was enthusiastic- 
ally passed by the Butte Miners' Union thanking 
him for his services in this behalf. 

In politics Mr. MacGinnis is an ardent Demo- 
crat, and has served his party well in the ranks and 
in conspicuous and responsible positions. In the 
Democratic national convention of 1900 he was 
Montana's national committeeman, and was large- 
ly instrumental in securing the seating of the regu- 
lar Democratic delegates from Montana. His 



majority that fall as a candidate for the lower 
house of the Montana legislature was more than 
8,000 votes, and in the session that followed he sur- 
prised and delighted his friends and discomfited 
his enemies by his readiness, directness and force 
in debate, his shrewdness, resourcefulness and 
skill as a tactician, his aggressive yet courtly 
character as a fighter, and his diplomatic ma- 
nipulation of all elements to the ends he had 
in view. His fight for the United States sen- 
atorship, in which he held up the election un- 
til the last night of the session, is one of the most 
remarkable exhibitions of parliamentary adroitness 
known to our history. In business relations and 
in private life he is one of the most accessible and 
obliging of men, although one of the busiest. 
However oppressed, or one might say, over- 
whelmed, with the multitude of matters which 
claim his attention, he can always find time to lis- 
ten to a miner or laborer who may have a grievance 
or need assistance ; to confer with a man on busi- 
ness, or to exchange a pleasant word with a friend 
or acquaintance ; and to all alike he is affable, 
genial, considerate and attentive. He well de- 
serves the popularity he enjoys with all classes and 
conditions of men ; for the engaging social quali- 
ties he exhibits toward all are the spontaneous off- 
spring of his generous nature and not the studied 
efforts of self-seeking policy or time-serving 
sycophancy. He is young, able, upright and sym- 
pathetic — such a man as the great Treasure state 
needs for her proper development, and for such 
she has in store ample rewards and worthy honors. 



W^ILLIAM WESLEY McCALL, one of the 
most enterprising and wide-awake business 
men in Whitehall, Jeffer.son county, was born in 
Millersburg, Holmes county, Ohio, on November 
15, 1845, the son of Thomas and Mary (Otis) Mc- 
Call. The father was born on the shores of Chesa- 
peake bay, Maryland, in 1792. The mother was 
a native of Ireland and the paternal grandfather 
was John McCall, a native of Scotland, who had 
emigrated early to Maryland. Thomas McCall, 
the father of W. W. McCall, removed from Mary- 
land to Ohio, and engaged in farming in Holmes 
county. In 1846 he went to Iowa, where he was a 
prosperous farmer, dying in 1864. 

W. W. McCall was reared and educated in Iowa, 
and here he engaged in farming until 1866. Then 



132 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



he was twenty-one years old and turned his face 
toward Montana. He came to Ireton by tram and 
thence by coach to Council Bluffs. At that time 
the Indians were threatening and troublesome, and 
he was detained at Fort Kearney until enough 
people had gathered to form a self-protecting 
train. When 130 men had arrived at the fort the 
train was made up and started across the plains for 
Montana. On reaching Big Horn they had three 
cattle stolen and not by Indians. They were 
found in the possesion of a Frenchman. No ques- 
tions were asked, but the Frenchman was quiet- 
ly and expeditiously hanged. The train then con- 
tinued on its way and was not molested by the 
Indians nor had any more cattle stolen, it reached 
Alder gulch on August 9, 1866, and here Mr. Mc- 
Call engaged in ranching for two years at the 
mouth of the gulch. In 1868 he purchased a ranch 
three miles below Silver Star, where he was pros- 
pered and remained until 1875. This ranch he 
bought from Israel Davis, and one day R. O. 
Hickman, who had worked for Davis, came in 
bare-headed, and told McCall that a road agent had 
attempted to hold him up, and he had shot at him 
and missed him. He then demanded possession 
of the ranch, saying it was his claim and that he 
had built a cabin on it, but Mr. McCall declined to 
give it up, and after explaining the details of his 
purchase, Hickman renounced his claim. 

In 187s Mr. McCall removed to Butte, engaged 
in teaming and was also the proprietor of the Cen- 
tennial boarding house. Here for three consecu- 
tive weeks he daily drove nine miles, chopped two 
cords of wood, returned and delivered the wood. 
This broke all previous records of the millmen and 
was considered a performance not likely to be 
eclipsed. In 1878 he removed to Fish creek, where 
be profitably engaged in farming and stockraising 
until 1880, when he purchased the Half-way house, 
on the Little Pipestone, of which he continued pro- 
prietor until 1885, when he removed to Silver Star. 
Here he engaged extensively in the meat business, 
having shops at Silver Star, Twin Bridges and 
Sheridan and also bought a hay ranch. In 1889 
he sold all these enterprises and removed to White- 
hall, his present home. Here he soon opened the 
first hotel of the place. He also went into mer- 
chandising, starting a general store which, in 1892, 
he sold to W. M. Fergus and the hotel to Henry 
Schmidt. Then engaging in the livery business 
for eighteen months, he sold this also and entered 
into partnership with Noble & Noble in butcher- 



ing. This was continued one year and then for 
two years he was engaged in a brick-making en- 
terprise. In March, 1898, he again became a ho- 
tel proprietor, and later removed to the Jefferson 
hotel and restaurant, where he has a most lucrative 
and successful trade. A new building was recently 
completed, giving fifteen additional rooms. 

On March 16, 1873, Mr. McCall was united in 
marriage to Miss Celeste Grace Jordan, born on 
January 21, 1854, at Joaquin, Cal. She is the 
daughter of Harrison Jordan, of Pleasant Valley, 
Mont., especial mention of whom is made on other 
pages of this work. Mr. and Mrs. McCall have 
seven children, Ernest R., married Miss Annie R. 
Houghton, and living at Whitehall; Ida Maude, 
now Mrs. F. E. Houghton, living in Whitehall ; 
Fay E., now in business in Whitehall ; Chester G., 
Floyd H., Pearl Blanche and Ethel Lucile. For 
three years Mr. McCall has been a school trustee, 
while fraternally he is a member of the United 
Workmen, Freemasons and Odd Fellows, in which 
body he has passed the chairs. Mrs. McCall is a 
member of the Eastern Star and of the Daughters 
of Rebekah. Mr. McCall came to Montana when 
it was necessary for a man to take his life in his 
hands on the long and perilous trip, and has de- 
voted himself diligently to the improvement of 
the advantages offered here so lavishly, and he has 
achieved success. He has gained many friends 
and, with the characteristics of the old-timers, he 
is highly esteemed, and also numbers many new 
friends in a wide and pleasant range of acquaint- 



TAMES D. McCAMMAN.— The old Keystone 
J state figures as the birthplace of the venerable 
and highly honored Montana pioneer whose name 
initiates this paragraph : and in his attractive home 
in Bozeman he is enjoying a measure of rest from 
active cares after a long life of useful endeavor that 
has brought a success worthy the name, since it 
has been achieved by indefatigable effort and fos- 
tered by an inflexible integrity of purpose. In the 
agnatic line Mr. McCanmian traces his ancestry 
to Scottish origin ; in the maternal line the stock is 
of pure German extraction, the original American 
ancestors having emigrated in the early pioneer 
epoch. Mr. McCamman was born in Mercer 
county. Pa., on January 30, 1822, the son of Jolin 
and Sarah (Wagner) McCamman, natives of Penn- 
sylvania. The father with his family removed to 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 133 



Ohio, where he and his wife passed the residue of 
their days, the father attaining the age of more 
than four score, and the revered mother passing 
away at the age of eighty-three. 

James D. McCamman was reared under the 
wholesome influences of the old homestead, at- 
tending the public schools until he reached the age 
of eighteen, when he began to learn the tailor's 
trade. He became skilled in all its details, and in 
1845 removed to Charlotte, Mich., where he was 
employed at his trade until the fall of the following 
year, when he was elected clerk of Eaton county, 
and served with signal efficiency. In 1850 lie re- 
turned to Ohio, and from there started on the long 
and weary overland trip to California at the time 
when the memorable gold excitement was at its 
height. The journey was a difficult and tedious 
one, but he finally arrived at his destination. After 
three years spent in mining and working on a 
stock farm he returned to Ohio and thence to 
Michigan, locating at Battle Creek, where was 
solemnized on February 15, 1853,- his man-iage to 
Miss Melvina Rice, who became the mother of 
three children, all of whom are now married and 
established in homes of their own. Mr. McCam- 
man has ten grandchildren. His second marriage 
was consummated December 31, 1 891, to Nannie J. 
Steele. He remained in Battle Creek until i860, 
and then removed to Charlotte, Mich., where he was 
engaged in the tailoring business until 1864, when 
he came to Montana, locating in Virginia City. He 
there engaged in mining for several months, but in 
1865 he settled on land in Gallatin county, taking up 
government claims on what is now known as Mc- 
Camman creek, so named in his honor, he being 
the first settler on the creek. Here he engaged in 
active farming and stockraising, as one of the 
l^ioneers in this line in Montana, and still retains 
possession of the old homestead. 

In 1875 M''- McCamman was appointed county 
treasurer of Gallatin county, and removed to Boze- 
man, which has since been his home, and which he 
has seen ad\'ance from a mere hamlet to a popu- 
lous and thriving little city of most attractive or- 
der. At the election of 1876 he was chosen as his 
own successor in office, serving three years, and 
was then tendered the nomination for representative 
of his county in the territorial legislature, an honor 
which he declined. He was re-elected on an inde- 
pendent ticket as county treasurer, and his entire 
term of service in this responsible office aggre- 
gated five years and nine months. His administra- 



tion of the finances of the county was signally able 
and conservative, and gained the endorsement of 
all classes, regardless of political affiliations. Mr. 
McCamman 's first presidential vote was cast for 
James K. Polk, and he is now as ever a stalwart 
supporter of the Democratic party. His first home 
in Montana was a diminutive log house, 14x16 feet 
in dimensions, with dirt floor — a dwelling radically 
dissimilar to his present beautiful cottage home 
in Bozeman, erected in 1879, and Mr. McCam- 
man was the first secretary and the treasurer of 
the new Gallatin County Pioneer Society on its 
re-organization in 1894, and he is one of its 
valued members and when the local grange of 
the Patrons of Husbandry was first organized 
many years ago, he was the first master. He 
stands as one of the most honored pioneers of Gal- 
latin county, has ever been ready to aid in forward- 
ing all worthy enterprises and projects for the pub- 
lic good, and no man in Bozeman is held in higher 
veneration and esteem. 



UJ. xM cCARTHY, of Canton, Broadwater coun- 
ty, one of the prominent and successful mer- 
chants of this locality, first came to Montana in' 
1882. His business career has been prosperous 
from the first, and he is now very largely interested 
in a valuable ranch as well as in the general store 
he so judiciously conducts. Mr. McCarthy was 
born at Brasher Falls, St. Lawrence county, N. 
Y., on April 15, 1858. He is a son of Jeremiah 
McCarthy, a native of Ireland, who emigrated in 
1847 ^"d located at Brasher Falls, where he re- 
sided until his death at the advanced age of ninety- 
three years. 

D. J. McCarthy was educated at Brasher Falls, 
and in 1882 came to Montana and located in Broad- 
water county. He immediately commenced work- 
ing at ranching for wages, and within a short time 
after his arrival he purchased a ranch in partner- 
ship with one Jerry Mahoney, the partnership con- 
tinuing pleasurably and profitably until March, 
1898, when Mr. McCarthy sold his interest and 
opened the general store, and in connection with 
this he conducts another ranch, and is prominently 
engaged in raising hay. On September 19, 1889, 
Mr. McCarthy was united in marriage to Miss 
Catherine Murray, a daughter of Thomas Murray, 
and a native of Macomb, McDonough county, 111. 
They have five children, Lynn Joseph, Louise Jane, 



"34 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA 



Vincent, Anna Marie and Irene Cecelia. Politi- 
cally Mr. McCarthy is a Democrat, and in 1884 he 
was elected constable and served four years, while 
he has been clerk of the school board for the past 
six years, postmaster since 1888 and also member 
of the Democratic county central committee, and 
socially he is a member of the United Workmen. 
His career in Montana has been eminently suc- 
cessful. He has won his way by great industry 
and sagacity in business affairs and most certainly 
deserves the high position which he has attained 
socially and in business. 



JOHN McCOURT. — This gentleman was one 01 
the honored pioneers of Montana, who ren- 
dered to the nation the valiant services of a loyal 
son when the integrity of the Union was menaced 
by armed resistance, whose life was one of unbend- 
ing honor and integrity, and who has left the price- 
less heritage of a good name. He was prominent- 
ly identified with Fergus county, where the family 
home is still maintained. Mr. McCourt was a na- 
tive of the state of New York, having been born at 
Mooer's, Clinton county, on the 21st of January, 
1840. His parents were James and Margaret 
(Young) McCourt, the former of whom was born 
in the north of Ireland, June 24, 1814. He came 
to America when a lad and settled in Clinton coun- 
ty, N. Y., where in 1839 he was married to Mar- 
garet Young. With his family of ten children he 
located in Polk county, Wis., in the spring of i860. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian church from 
early manhood. In politics he was first a Whig, 
and, after the death of that party, a stanch Repubi- 
can, having voted for William Henry Harrison for 
President and twice for his grandson, Benjamin 
Harrison. He died at his home at Sand Lake, 
Wis., July 20, 1893, aged seventy-nine years. Mar- 
garet McCourt, his wife was born in Glasgow, 
Scotland, December 14, 1819, and came to Ameri- 
ca when a child, residing with her parents in Can- 
ada until her marriage. She was always a Pres- 
byterian and died in that faith May 20, 1888, in her 
seventieth year. Their children were John (de- 
ceased), Mary, Thomas, Matthew L., James H., 
William H., Charles (deceased), Anna A., Freder- 
ick and David A. 

John McCourt received a common school edu- 
cation and assisted his parents until he had at- 
tained his legal majority. Just at this time the 
dark cloud of the Civil war obscured the national 



horizon, and Mr. McCourt manifested his loyalty 
by enlisting as a private soldier in a Wisconsin reg- 
iment in November, 1861, and continued in service 
until honorably discharged at the close of the war. 
He then returned to his home, and in 1866 made 
the long trip across the plains to Montana in Capt. 
James L. Fisk's train. He located near the pres- 
ent site of Helena, and devoted several years to 
successful placer mining. Thereafter he engaged 
in stockraising in the Missouri valley until 1883, 
when he came to Fergus county and took up his 
abode on the ranch which is still the family home. 
The ranch is located one mile northeast of Garneill, 
and comprises 360 acres. Here Mr. McCourt was 
for a number of years engaged in raising horses 
and cattle. In politics he was a Republican, and in 
all the relations of life commanded confidence and 
high regard. When Fergus county was created he 
was appointed one of its first commissioners, hold- 
ing this office by appointment for one year until 
the first election, when he was chosen to serve 
three more years. His official duties were faith- 
fully discharged. His death occurred on February 
21, 1 90 1, and the community then sustained the 
loss of one of its most honored citizens. 

The 30th day of November, 1884, witnessed the 
marriage of Mr. McCourt with Mrs. Elizabeth 
Currier, a native of New Brunswick, and the 
daughter of William and Mary Steeves. They 
continued their abode in New Brunswick where 
Mr. Steeves was a farmer until his death, which 
occurred in 1891. His widow is now residing on 
the old homestead in New Brunswick. Of thdr 
seven children all are living save one, who died in 
infancy. Their names are : William, Elizabeth, 
Mary J., Roderick, Peter W. and Sarah L. Mr. 
McCourt is survived by his widow and their three 
children — Edna Z., Clarence W. and Edward V. 
Mrs. McCourt 's first marriage was to George E. 
Currier. They resided at Belfast, Me., and had 
three children, of whom two are dead, and the 
other, Garnette, is now the wife of W. T. Neill, of 
Garneill. (See his sketch elsewhere in this vol- 
ume.) 



ELIAS J. McCALLUM.— This gentleman also 
is one of the prosperous ranchers and stock 
growers of Fergus county, where he has main- 
tained his home for nearl\- a score of years and 
attained success. 

Elias James McCallum was born in Caldwell 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



135 



county, Missouri, on the 29th of November, 1858, 
being a son of Andrew J. and Mary J. (Bradley) 
McCallum, the former a native of South Carolina 
and the latter of Missouri. The father early emi- 
grated to Missouri and there married. He located 
in Caldwell county and was there a farmer until 
1882, when he removed with his family to Mon- 
tana, and located on Cottonwood creek in Fergus 
county, two and one-half miles east of the village 
of Cottonwood. He has ever since been engaged 
in farming and stockgrowing on his homestead of 
160 acres. He is a Democrat in politics, and both 
he and his wife are members of the Christian 
church. Of their seven children, two have 
passed away, Nathaniel and one who died in in- 
fancy. Those living are Elias J., \A^illiam F., 
Lucia F., Samuel D. and Mollie J. 

Elias J. McCallum began to work on the home- 
stead farm at an early age, and his educational ad- 
vantages were those of the public schools of his na- 
tive state. He remained at the parental home un- 
til he was twenty-one, when he engaged in farming 
for himself in Caldwell county, Mo., until 1882, 
when he accompanied his parents to Montana. 
Three miles south of the town of Cottonwood, 
Fergus county, he located a homestead ranch of 
160 acres, and from this as a nucleus he has ex- 
tended his holdings until he now has a valuable 
ranch property of 1,100 acres, of which 600 acres 
are available for cultivation. Mr. McCallum, 
however, gives special attention to the raising of 
cattle, handling a high grade of stock. His suc- 
cess has come as the result of good management 
and industry. In his political allegiance he is a 
supporter of the Democratic party, and fraternally 
he is identified with the Woodmen of the World. 

On the 2Sth of February, 1885, Mr. McCallum 
was united in marriage to Miss Frances R. Gilder- 
sieve, who was born on Long Island. N. Y., the 
daughter of Piatt L. and Sarah (Darling) Gilder- 
sieve, who were likewise born in New York and 
who emigrated to Missouri in an early day; the 
father, in early life a ship-builder, became a farmer 
in Missouri. Both he and his wife were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and his po- 
litical support was given to the Republican party. 
He resides in Stone county, Mo., surviving his 
wife, who died on the 27th of August, 1891. Their 
nine children are still living, their names being: 
Isabella, Alice, Bradford L., Truman P., Nellie, 
Sarah J., Frances R., Amanda E. and Mary E. 
Mr. and Mrs. McCallum were the parents of eight 



children, one of whom died in infancy, the surviv- 
ors being: Ernest, John L., Elias J., Frances R., 
Grace D.,* Jennie M. and Morris H. Mr. and Mrs. 
McCallum are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. 



RLEE McCULLOCH.— As a representative 
member of the bar of Montana, actively en- 
gaged in the practice of law in Ravalli county, with 
residence and headquarters at Hamihon, Mr. Mc- 
Culloch well deserves attention. He is a scion of 
fine old southern stock, and in all the relations of 
life has proved himself worthy of his race. Robert 
Lee McCulloch was born in Tipton, Moniteau 
county, Mo., on January 29, 1869. His father, 
Gen. Robert McCulloch, was born in the Old Do- 
minion, the original American ancestors having 
located there in early Colonial days. Gen. McCul- 
loch rendered distinguished service in the Confed- 
erate army in the Civil war, commanding the Sec- 
ond Missouri Cavalry, under Gen. Nathan B. For- 
rest. He took up his residence in Missouri as a 
pioneer where he has been an agriculturalist 
and very prominent in local politics. He served as 
county collector and later as sheriff of Cooper 
county, and thereafter held the office of state regis- 
ter of land for three consecutive terms. He is 
now living retired, at Booneville, Mo., at the vener- 
able age of eighty-one. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Louisa Waite, was born in Missouri, and 
attained the age of seventy-six. They were par- 
ents of two daughters and one son, the daughters 
being Bettie McCulloch and Mrs. George M. Wil- 
liams, now residing at Dallas, Tex. 

In his early educational privileges R. Lee Mc- 
Culloch was signally favored. He attended pri- 
vate schools in Booneville, Mo., continued his 
studies at McCune College, at Louisiana, and at an 
academy at Pilot Grove, while at the age of seven- 
teen he matriculated in the Missouri State Univer- 
sity at Columbia, pursuing his literary studies here 
until he was twenty, when he entered the law de- 
partment and completed the prescribed course, 
graduating as a member of the class c^ 1891, being 
simultaneously admitted to the Missouri bar. In 
October, 1891, Mr. McCulloch came to Montana, 
locating in Missoula, where he entered into legal 
practice and soon secured his due quota of legal 
business. After four years he entered into an alli- 
ance with John M. Evans, which continued only 
six months, for then, in the early part of 1896, Mr. 



136 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



McCulloch came to Hamilton, Ravalli county, and 
entered into partnership with Charles J\i. Crutch- 
field, with whom he was associated in practice un- 
til January i, 1899, since which time he has con- 
ducted an individual practice, retaining a clientage 
of distinction and being known as a thorough 
legist and an able advocate. 

Mr. McCulloch has been an active and efficient 
worker in the cause of the Democratic party, one 
of its wheelhorses in his county. In the fall of 
1894 he was a candidate from Missoula county for 
representative in the lower house of the legislature 
and in 1898 he was the Democratic candidate for 
county attorney of Ravalli county, meeting defeat 
at the polls in each instance from natural political 
exigencies. Fraternally he holds membership in 
the Masonic order, the Improved Order of Red 
Men, and his college Greek-letter fraternity, the 
Sigma Nu. In March, 1901, Gov. Toole conferred 
distinguished preferment upon Mr. McCulloch, 
making him adjutant-general of the state mihtia 
and thus a member of the gubernatorial staff. He 
has organized five companies of the National 
Guard since his induction in office, and is rapidly 
increasing the prestige of the organization of citi- 
zen soldiers in the state. On April 19, 1899, at St. 
Louis, Mo., was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
McCulloch to Miss Lenore Barnard Miles, a 
daughter of Dr. D. D. Miles and Mary (Jones) 
Miles, the former of whom is a distinguished mem- 
ber of the medical profession in St. Louis. Mr. 
and Mrs. McCulloch have one child. Robert Miles, 
born on May 18, 1900. 



HON. JOHN KINNA.— Among the leaders of 
thought and commercial enterprise, the found- 
ers of cities and builders of commonwealths, none 
were more respected in their lives or more honored 
after they had passed away than the Hon. John 
Kinna, the first mayor of the city of Helena. He 
was a strong man, of positive character, a leader 
in business and in public life, who impressed him- 
self upon the community in which he lived and did 
much to influence and direct the aflfairs of his fel- 
lowmen. John Kinna was one of those rare men 
whom everybody liked and respected. He was a 
man of decided opinions, of strong likes and dis- 
likes, but with all so sincere and honest, so manly 
and outspoken, that he compelled the admiration 
of all with whom he came in contact. He was al- 



ways and everywhere a manly man. His faults 
were manly, and his life was an open book to his 
family, his neighbors and his friends. He meant 
what he said, and he said what he meant. No one 
knew him but to like him, no one ever justly 
breathed one word derogatory to his sturdy char- 
acter as a man and a citizen. 

Mr. Kinna was a native of Ireland, having been 
born in Dublin in February, 1838, and he inherited 
the light heart and sanguine disposition of the 
Irish race. His parents were Michael and Mary 
Kinna, both natives of Ireland. In 1852 they came 
to America, like so many others, to better their 
condition in the new world, and with their little 
family located in the city of Carthage, state of 
New York. The parents, who were devout mem- 
bers of the Catholic church, had a family of four 
sons and two daughters, Mr. Kinna being the 
youngest. He received a common school educa- 
tion, and learned the tinner's trade at Rome, N. Y. 
He remained in Rome, following his occupation of 
journeyman tinner until 1859, when the discovery 
of new gold fields in Colorado induced him to seek 
his fortune in the west. In Denver he engaged in 
the hardware business with John A. Nye and D. T. 
Smith under the firm name of John A. Nye & Co., 
and remained with them until 1864. During his 
residence in Denver he was united in marriage to 
Miss Janet McGavran, the daughter of Judge 
Thomas McGavran, one of the leading old time 
citizens of that city. 

In 1864 Mr. Kinna sold his business interests 
in Denver and soon purchased a large stock of 
hardware merchandise and started overland to the 
new placer mines of Alder gulch, at Virginia City. 
Arriving there with his little family and wagon-train 
loaded with hardware, in the summer of 1864, he 
opened the first hardware store in what is now the 
state of Montana. In the year 1866 the discovery 
of rich placer mines in Last Chance and Grizzly 
gulches having created a stampede to that section. 
.\lr. Kinna removed his stock of goods to Helena, 
and there also he established the first hardware 
store in the present capital of Montana. Mr. Kinna 
remained in business here the remainder of his 
life, being associated during nearly all the time with 
Hon. William Jack, now a prominent citizen of 
Los Angeles, Cal., under the firm name of Kinna 
& Jack. Their business was very extensive, and 
they maintained a large branch store in Butte City, 
where Mr. Jack was in charge. 

Mr. Kinna had, like other enterprising men, his 




John Kinna 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"37 



ups and downs in business, although he fortunately 
never sustained any serious reverses. The caprice 
of fortune, changeful as the lights and shadows of 
a summer's day, has made and wrecked the lives of 
thousands. But the pioneers of Montana were a 
hardy and determined set of men, and no reverses 
of fortune could break their spirit. They were 
filled with hope and enthusiasm and borne up by 
an unconquerable pluck and resolution which never 
gave up to anything but death. John Kinna never 
bowed his head in defeat before any man or before 
any circumstances of fortune until the "old man 
with the sickle" came his way. It was this spirit 
which leveled mountains and bridged rivers, which 
vanquished the savage and brought a new and 
vigorous civilization into the waste places. 

During the early history of Lewis and Clarke 
county, Mr. "Kinna served two years as county 
treasurer, and declined a renomination. In the year 
1881, upon the organization of Helena as a city, 
he was elected its first mayor. He assisted ma- 
terially in establishing economical and conservative 
municipal government in every department of the 
city's affairs, and the people of Helena owe much 
to the able and careful conduct of public business 
at the beginning of the city's history under the guid- 
ing hand of its first mayor. In politics Mr. Kinna 
was always a Republican, giving loyal and unfailing 
support to the principles and candidates of that 
party. He served for several years as chairman of 
the Republican territorial committee, and also took 
a leading part in the councils of his party in the 
city, county and territory. In the early days both 
in \'irginia City and Helena, he was a member and 
one of the leaders of the Vigilance Committee, 
which did so much to drive out crime and criminals 
and make IMontana a safe and lawful place of resi- 
dence for law-abiding citizens. Fraternally he was 
a member of the Masonic order. 

Mr. Kinna, like many of the prominent and en- 
terprising men of Montana, was largely interested 
in mining. Among the large properties in which 
he was a part owner was the celebrated Elkhorn 
mine, which for many years was operated by Mr. 
Kinna and his associates at a handsome profit, and 
was then sold to the London Exploration Society 
of England. While yet a comparatively young 
man, j\lr. Kinna died on October 4, 1888, but he 
had crowded into the period of his short life ac- 
tivities and achievements far beyond what fall to 
the lot of most men. He left a considerable for- 
tune to his surviving widow and children, of whom 



there are six. Of these, Clarence J. is now a suc- 
cessful merchant at Lowry, Mont.; Norma is the 
wife of Hon. William Flowerree, of Teton county, 
one of the leading stockmen of Montana; John is 
in mining business in the state of Colorado; Janet 
is the wife of Prof. Mr. Payden, of Chicago ; 
Thomas is deceased; and Elizabeth, the youngest 
daughter, is residing with her mother at. the family 
home in the city of Great Falls. Mrs. Kinna is a 
member of the Episcopal church. 

In every station, whether in public position or 
public life, Hon. John Kinna was respected and 
honored by all who knew him. He lived a success- 
ful, useful and generous life. He was devoted to 
his family and his home. He was very charitable, 
and many successful men now residing in Mon- 
tana owe their start in life to the kindly helpfulness 
of John Kinna. His name will live in the grate- 
ful recollection of those men, as well as in the mem- 
ory of all. Of him it may be said with truth that 
at the close of life he could "wrap the drapery of his 
couch about him and lie down to pleasant dreams." 
Men such as he have been in every age the pride 
and glory of the state. 



pLARENCE J. KINNA, of Lowry, Teton coun- 
^y ty, is a Montanian by birth and one of the suc- 
cessful, enterprising business men of the state. 
He was born at Alder gulch, now Virginia City, 
March 4, 1865, the son of John and Janet (Mc- 
Gavern) Kinna. The father, who came from 
Ireland in 1852, played quite a prominent part 
in the development of the new territory 
during his Hfetime. It was in 1864 that he 
made his initial visit, locating at Alder gulch, then 
famous for its productive placer mines, and here 
engaged in the hardware business. (See preced- 
ing sketch.) 

The foundation of an excellent education was 
obtained by our subject in the public schools of 
Helena, and this was greatly amplified by a two- 
years business course at Ann Arbor, Mich. On 
his graduation he devoted his time to bookkeep- 
ing in his father's store until the death of the lat- 
ter, when he became manager of the estabHsh- 
ment and retained that position until 1891. He 
then disposed of his interest to Thomas Goff, and 
removed to Denver, Colo., where, until 1896, he 
was actively engaged in the real estate business. 
On his return to Montana he located at Sun river, 



II38 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



and for one year he was in the employment of the 
Sun River Mercantile Company. Since 1897 he 
has been connected with a general store for W. K. 
Flowerree near Lowry, Mont., the enterprise being 
eminently successful. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, being past chan- 
cellor of his lodge. Politically he is an influential 
RepubHcan and has represented the party in 
numerous important conventions in Lewis and 
Clarke county. He is a young man of superior 
ability and wide experience in business affairs, and 
one who has won and holds the esteem and confi- 
dence of a large circle of acquaintances. 



CTERLING McDonald.— The subject of this 
vl review is one of the honored citizens and able 
officials of Choteau, Teton county, where he has 
served as clerk of the district court since the time 
of the organization of the county. Mr. McDonald' 
is a native of the old Buckeye state, having been 
born in Columbus, Ohio, October 22, 1836. His 
father, John McDonald, was born in Tennessee, 
whence he accompanied his parents on their re- 
moval to Ohio, they being members of a Scotch 
colony which was then established in Madison 
county. He passed his boyhood days on the pa- 
rental farmstead and later learned the blacksmith 
trade in Columbus, and followed this vocation un- 
til his death on August 13, 185 1. In the city of 
Columbus, in 1834, Mr. McDonald was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary O'Conner, who was born 
and reared in Ireland, whence she came to the 
United States in 1825. Her death occurred in 
Clark county. Mo., in September, 1881. 

Sterling McDonald received his early education 
in the public schools of his home, near Columbus, 
attending the same during the winter months and 
assisting in the work of the homestead during the 
summer seasons, his father having been engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in connection with work 
at his trade. In 1857 our subject removed to Scot- 
land county, Mo., where he devoted his attention 
to farming until June, 1861, when he responded to 
the call to arms and enlisted in the Union ranks 
as a member of Company A, Second Missouri 
Cavalry, with which he served until February 27, 
1865, doing duty in Arkansas and Missouri. In 
May, 1865, Mr. McDonald was appointed clerk of 
Scotland county. Mo., and was in tenure of office 
until January i, 1879. He then moved to Breck- 



inridge, Colo., near Leadville, and was there en- 
gaged in prospecting and mining for a period of 
four years, when he returned to Missouri and was 
employed in a grocery for a period of three years. 
In November, 1888, Mr. McDonald went to Santa 
Barbara, Cal., remaining until the following spring, 
when he took up his residence in Choteau county, 
Mont., and in this vicinity was employed on a 
sheep ranch for four years. 

Teton county was organized by segregation 
from Choteau county, in 1893, and in the enabling 
act Mr. McDonald was named as clerk of the dis- 
trict court, and has been chosen to the office at 
each election as the candidate of the Republican 
party. He has shown fidelity and ability in con- 
ducting the affairs of the court, and has gained the 
endorsement of all classes, regardless of political 
affiliations. Fraternally he is identified with Cho- 
teau Lodge No. 44, A. F. & A. M., while he keeps 
alive his interest in his old comrades in arms by 
retaining membership in Sheridan Post No. 18, 
G. A. R., of Great Falls. 

In 1859, near Memphis, Mo., was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. McDonald to Miss Electa Sum- 
merlin, who was born in Keosauqua, Iowa, on 
August 22, 1837. Of this union five children have 
been born, namely: Lola B., the widow of Frank 
V. Sleeth (deceased), of New York city; Charles 
S., a successful sheepgrower of Teton county; 
Mary A., the wife of John B. Oliver, of Paradise, 
Cal. ; Jennie M., who is the wife of Philip G. Rimell, 
of Teton county, and Catherine I., the wife of Ken- 
neth G. McLean, of Augusta, Mont. 



E THEODORE LUTZ, M. D.— In the subject 
of this review the blood of the sturdy Ger- 
man and the versatile and adaptable Irishman 
are commingled. His father was R. Lutz, a na- 
tive of Baden in the Fatherland, and his mother 
was Mary Hungerford, a native of Dublin, Ireland. 
The father came to America in the 'fifties, and 
settled in Pennsylvania, where he remained a num- 
ber of years, removing from there to Illinois and 
later to Ottumwa, Iowa, where he was profitably 
engaged in contracting and building until a few 
years ago when he retired on account of increasing 
age. He is still living in that city and is now 
eighty-three years old, but still vigorous, healthy 
and active. Dr. Lutz was born at Ottumwa, Iowa, 
May 29, 1870, and received his elementary edu- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"39 



cational training in that town. Later he attended 
a preparatory school at Beloit, Kan., and was grad- 
uated in 1891, after which he spent a year at Camp- 
bell University, located at Helton, Kan., and then 
entered the University Medical College at Kansas 
City, where he was graduated very high in his 
class at the end of a three-years course. He fin- 
ished his professional training with a post-graduate 
course at the Polyclinic Institute connected with 
Bellevue Hospital in New York city, but before 
doing so spent some time at Bannack, Mont. On 
his return to the state he located at Red Lodge, 
where he has since been actively engaged in gen- 
eral practice which has been steadily increasing 
in volume and value, and raising him professionally 
in the estimation of the people of his county. 

In addition to his general practice the Doctor 
is the medical examiner for a number of fraternal 
organizations, among them the Modern Wood- 
men of America, the Woodmen of the World, the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Select 
Knights and Ladies, the Scottish Highlanders, 
the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, and for 
the Northwestern Life Insurance Company and a 
number of others. He holds membership in the 
Modern Woodmen, the Woodmen of the World, 
the United Workmen and the Order of Elks. Pro- 
fessionally he has diplomas from the states of Mis- 
souri, Idaho and Montana. He has built up a large 
and profitable practice in Carbon county, where he 
is highly respected for his worth as a man by a host 
of warm friends drawn to him by his engaging so- 
cial qualities. His future is full of promise pro- 
fessionally and otherwise, and he is contributing 
essentially and substantially to the progress and de- 
velopment of his county. 



TAMES McGRAW. — From County Down, 
J Ireland, where he was born August 28, 1844, to 
Rosebud county, Mont., where he now lives, is a 
wide sweep of longitude, but it was bravely com- 
passed ; and the steady advance from poverty to 
affluence, with its variety of incidents of adventure 
and experience, has well shown the wisdom of our 
subject. Mr. McGraw is the son of Richard and 
Grace (Wilson) McGraw, natives of Ireland, where 
the latter died in 1853. Two years later the father 
brought his family to the United States, located 
near Leavenworth, Kan., and engaged in farming 
until his death, which occurred in 1883. His son. 



our immediate subject, remained at home assisting 
on the farm and attending the neighboring district 
schools as he had opportunity until he was nearly 
nineteen years of age. In 1862 he took service 
with a government outfit from Leavenworth to 
Fort Union, N. M., driving a mule team, returning 
home in October of the same year. He then 
bought a freighting outfit and followed the busi- 
ness from Leavenworth until the fall of 1864, hav- 
ing: Forts Riley, Harney, Dodge, Earned and 
Kearney, and the cities of Julesburg, Denver and 
others on his route. In 1864 he joined the Union 
army at Kansas City as a member of the Nine- 
teenth Kansas Cavalry, under Gen. Blunt, and was 
discharged from the service November 26th of the 
same year at the same place. He then resumed 
freighting for a few months, and in 1866 rented 
a farm near Leavenworth, but in 1867 went to 
freighting again. Soon after starting out he and 
his companions had one day's fight with the Indians 
at Little Blue river. Neb., the Indians capturing his 
outfit. On July 4 he was again attacked by the 
Sioux near Julesburg, Colo., and had a stubborn 
fight with them. After this he went to North 
Platte and furnished ties for the Union Pacific 
Railroad. He had another encounter with the 
Sioux that fall, in which six of his party of ten were 
killed. In 1868 he hauled supplies for the Union 
Pacific from Green river to Fort Bridget, Utah, 
and the next year went to Fort McPherson, Neb., 
where he participated in a severe battle between a 
big war party of Sioux and Cheyennes, in which 
eighty volunteer citizens under "Buffalo Bill" 
(William Cody), the scout, and several companies 
of United States troops, all under Col. Carrington, 
were engaged. From 1870 to 1873 he was en- 
gaged in freighting in the Indian Territory and 
Texas ; in the summer of 1873 he was employed 
on construction work on the Texas Pacific Rail- 
road from Longview to Dallas ; later he took a 
contract on the Arkansas Central, at Pine Bluffs, 
Ark. ; and again, while engaged on a contract on 
the Texas Central, his mule teams were stolen, 
and he abandoned railroad work and engaged in 
the sawmill and lumbering business in eastern 
Texas for the next three years. In 1877 he went 
to the Big Horn mountains, Custer county, Mont., 
and located a ranch on Sand creek, where he en- 
gaged in prospecting for gold and hunting buffalo 
from 1878 to 1881. The following spring he re- 
moved to Big Porcupine creek, six miles from For- 
syth, Rosebud county, where he has since made his 



[40 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



home. In addition to his home ranch of 200 acres, 
Mr. McGraw has 320 acres in Froze-to-Death bot- 
tom, 160 acres on the Yellowstone river and 2,000 
acres on Little Porcupine, forty miles north of 
Forsyth. He devotes his attention entirely to 
raising cattle and hay, being one of the most ex- 
tensive producers in this part of Montana. 

Politically he is a Republican, but is not active in 
party affairs. He was married at Fort Keogh, 
July 26, 1881, to Miss Rose McKay, a native of 
County Antrim, Ireland, where she was born in 
1847. They have six children, namely : John, aged 
nineteen ; Henry, seventeen ; Mary, James, Thomas 
and Anna. Through his sterling qualities he has 
steadily grown in the esteem and regard of his fel- 
lowmen. While he devotes his time and energies 
to his ranches and other business interests he has 
not neglected those duties which belong to the 
household, as is evidenced by his handsome resi- 
dence in Forsyth, occupied by the family in order 
that his children may have better school facilities 
than are attainable in the country. This is a cen- 
ter of pleasing and genial hospitality, and a popular 
resort for the hosts of friends he and Mrs. McGraw 
have attached to themselves. 



KENi\ETH B. McIVER, one of the enterpris- 
ing and successful ranchmen and stockraisers 
of Montana, is a resident of Great Falls. When he 
came into the country in 1878 there was not a 
building on the site of this now flourishing city, 
and practically he is its earliest pioneer. He was 
born in Winslow, Canada, on November 20, 1859. 
His father, Angus Mclver, was a native of Scot- 
land, and his mother, Effie (Campbell) Mclver, was 
also born in that country. They are dead, and on 
April 17, 1898, his brother Hector died in Great 
Falls. The other members of the family, seven 
brothers and sisters, still reside in Canada. 

Kenneth B. Mclver was raised as a farmer boy 
and received his education in the public schools of 
Winslow. When he was eighteen years of age, 
in 1877, he went to Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he 
remained a year. In 1878 he came to Montana, 
worked for Robert Vaughn, of Sun River, for five 
years. However, in 1882, Mr. Mclver went into 
business on his own account in stockraising and 
farming in the Sun river valley. To this he added 
in 1894 a profitable dairy business on Sun river, 
six miles west of Great Falls, and this successful 



industry he has since continued. He feeds an 
average of 100 cows and finds a ready market for 
the product of his dairy in Great Falls. At pres- 
ent he employs nine men on the ranch. In 1890 Mr. 
Mclver was married to Miss Viola Vaughn, at this 
time a resident^ of Chenoa, 111., a niece of Robert 
Vaughn, one of the most prominent citizens • of 
Great Falls, an individual sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. They have two children, 
Angus, aged eight, and Grace, aged six years. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Mclver is a member of the Odd Fellows 
and the Woodmen of the World. In the commun- 
ity in which he resides and throughout Cascade 
county Mr. Mclver has built up a substantial repu- 
tation for integrity and fair dealing, as well as for 
business tact and good judgment. 



pHARLES McDonnell is one of the sturdy 
v^ sons of the Emerald Isle who, in Montana, by 
his progressive and well directed efforts, has gained 
a place among the successful stockgrowers of 
Sweet Grass county. Mr. ]\IcDonnell is a na- 
tive of County Mayo, Ireland, born on April 16, 
1850, the son of John and Mary (Hefferon) Mc- 
Donnell, who were the parents of two sons and 
two daughters, and both representing stanch old 
Irish stock. The father was a farmer and mer- 
chant, so continuing until his death. 

Charles McDonnell was educated in the national 
schools and a private academy, and devoted his 
attention to agriculture in Ireland until 1870, when 
he came to the LTnited States, and was engaged in 
sheep growing in California until JMay, 1880, when 
he drove a band of sheep to Montana, going di- 
rectly to Big Timber creek and being the first to 
drive sheep over the Bozeman pass to the Yellow- 
stone river, this feat causing quite a sensation. In 
1881 he removed to American Fork, and took up 
a pre-emption claim, to which he has since added 
until his ranch has now 26,000 acres. From the 
time of leaving California Mr. McDonnell has 
maintained a partnership with Edward Veasey, and 
they have had as many as 20,000 sheep at one time, 
and have raised hay extensively, the land being un- 
der most effective irrigation. The water is se- 
cured from two ditches, one five and the other two 
miles in length, and carrying respectively 1,000 
and 1,500 inches of water, sufficient to properly ir- 
rigate three sections of land. The partners have 
on the ranch large bands of sheep, and give special 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 141 



attention to a cross between the Cotswold and 
Merino. 

Mr. McDonnell is one of the progressive and 
successful sheep growers of the state, and has 
conducted operations upon an extensive scale. He 
is a man of marked executive abilit)', and his gen- 
ial nature and sterling character have won him 
the respect and friendship of all. He is enterpris- 
ing and public-spirited, ever read}' to lend his aid 
to the best interests of the county and state. In 
politics he supports the Republican party, and fra- 
ternally he is an Odd Fellow. 

On December 22, 1891, Mr. McDonnell was 
united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Feeley, born 
in County Roscommon, Ireland, the daughter of 
Patrick Feeley, who still resides in Ireland. Mr. 
McDonnell and wife have four daughters and one 
son : Bella, Anna, Edith, Evaline and Alexander 
Ranald. The family home is a fine dwelling of 
modern architecture, where a gracious hospitality 
is dispensed. 



PJ. McINTYRE. — Occupying positions of 
public trust and responsibility and identified 
with an important line of business enterprise, the 
subject of this review is known as one of the repre- 
sentative and progressive citizens of the attractive 
village of Havre, Choteau county, Mont., while his 
prestige is due to his ability and unswerving integ- 
rity of character. Mr. Mclntyre is a native of 
Arnprior, Ontario, Canada, where he was born 
May 28, 1861, the son of Philip and Ellen (Cava- 
nagh) Mclntyre, both of whom were natives of the 
Dominion of Canada, where they passed their en- 
tire Hves, the death of each occurring in 1863, when 
the subject of this review was a child of but two 
years. The father was a wheelwright by trade, but 
devoted the greater portion of his life to agricul- 
tural pursuits. P. J. Mclntyre, the subject of this 
sketch, was reared in his native town, completing 
a course of study in the local high school, where he 
was graduated at the age of fifteen years. Upon 
leaving school he entered a drug store in Arnprior 
and there served an apprenticeship of three years' 
duration and then remained two years as assistant, 
thus completing the practical course in pharmacy 
and gaining title to registration as a fully qualified 
pharmacist. In 1883 Mr. Mclntyre removed to 
St. Paul, Minn., where he secured a position as 
bookkeeper for Langdon, Shepherd & Co., rail- 
road contractors, and remained with the firm for a 



period of two years. From 1885 until 1891 he was 
individually engaged in contracting in connection 
with the construction of the Great Northern Rail- 
road in Dakota and Montana, and after the com- 
pletion of his contracts, in 1891, he took up his 
permanent residence at Havre. Within the first 
year of his residence here Mr. Mclntyre was ap- 
pointed to the office of justice of the peace by the 
county commissioners, and as a candidate of the 
Democratic party he has been consecutively 
chosen as his own successor at each election since 
that time. He has been a notary public since 1894 
and United States land commissioner since 1896, 
and in each of these positions he has shown himself 
to be a capable and conscientious executive, gain- 
ing and retaining the respect and confidence of all 
with whom he is thrown in contact. In 1895 Mr. 
Mclntyre engaged in the insurance business in 
Havre, and he has secured a large and represent- 
ative clientage, being one of the most successful 
underwriters in this section of the state. 

Politically he has taken an active interest in the 
cause of the Democratic party, being prominent in 
its local affairs and a stanch advocate of its prin- 
ciples and policies. Fraternally he is identified 
with Allendale Lodge No. 35, Knights of Pythias, 
and Assinniboine Lodge No. 56, I. O. O. F., at 
Havre. At Arnprior, Canada, in December, 1880, 
Mr. Mclntyre was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Marten, who was born at Pembrook, 
Canada, in 1863, and of this union have been bom 
two children : Emma Jane and Lauretta. 



FORESTER McGregor, one of the promi- 
nent and enterprising ranchmen of Flathead 
county, with a beautiful and highly productive 
ranch on Lake McGregor, which was named in his 
honor, was born at Sterlingshire, Scotland, June 
21, 1836. He attended school in his native place 
until he was sixteen years old, and then, in 1852, 
came to the United States. He passed the first 
five years of his life in America working in the coal 
mining regions of Pennsylvania. In 1858 he came 
west to California, and for four years was engaged 
in prospecting and mining in that state. In 1862 
he removed to the mining districts of Nevada, and 
remained there four years. In the summer of 1866 
he visited various mining sections of Montana, but 
returned to Nevada in 1867, and from that time 
until 1 881 vvas engaged in mining at Virginia City 



1 142 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



and Gold Hill in that state. During his mining 
experience in California and Nevada, he was at 
different times the owner of valuable claims, which, 
however, were always disposed of at nominal prices 
without bringing him such fortunes as fell to the 
lot of James G. Fair, John Mackay, Marcus Daly, 
and others who were his associates and intimate 
acquaintances in the early mining days. In 1881 
he came to Montana, and after living three years 
at Tobacco Plains, went to the Flathead reserva- 
tion, where he made his home until 1887, at which 
time he located his present home ranch at Little 
Bitter Root and Thompson rivers, on McGregor 
lake, adjoining the reservation. To his original 
i6o-acre homestead he has added adjacent lands 
which have increased his ranch to 800 acres of 
good meadow and timber land, which is devoted to 
raising cattle and hay, his average herd of cattle 
being from 600 to 1,000 head. McGregor lake is 
a fine body of water, six miles in length by one mile 
in width. It affords a desirable adjunct to Mr. 
McGregor's ranch, which is a model in location, 
improvement, cultivation and pleasing variety of 
scenery and soil. 

In politics Mr. McGregor is a Republican. In 
1899, at Kalispell, he was united in marriage with 
Mrs. Kate Wallach, who was born in New York 
state in May, 1837. Her father, John T. Campbell, 
of Caledonia, was a pioneer in the Genesee valley, 
in that state, and both he and her mother (Elinore 
McPherson) were of distinguished Scotch lineage. 

Mr. McGregor's parents, Alexander and Ellen 
(Henderson) McGregor, were natives of Scotland, 
where the former was born in 1797. He was a 
carpenter by trade, and after his arrival in the 
United States in 1852, settled in Luzerne county, 
Pa., and worked at his trade until his death in 1863. 
His wife died in Scotland in 1841. 



DAVID S. McLEOD, the present assessor of 
Gallatin county, is recognized as one of the 
able and representative young business men of this 
section of the state, and his executive ability, pro- 
gressive methods and sturdy integrity of character 
are certain to secure him a place of still greater 
distinction in the industrial and public activities 
of Montana. Mr. McLeod comes of good old 
Scottish ancestry in the agnatic line, and the same 
is true in regard to the maternal ancestry. He was 
born on Prince Edward's Island, Canada, on April 
22, 1864, the son of William and Mary (McDou- 



gal) McLeod, the former a native of Scotland, 
whence he came to America as a boy, accompanying 
his parents. The father of our subject passed the 
remainder of his life on the old homestead on 
Prince Edward's Island, where his widow still re- 
tains her home. They were the parents of ten 
children, six of whom are still living. The pater- 
nal grandfather of Mr. IMcLeod was Roderick Mc- 
Leod, and his maternal grandfather was Allan 
McDougal, both natives of Scotland. 

David S. McLeod was reared on the old farm- 
stead in Canada, and his educational advantages 
were those afforded by the district schools; but his 
vigorous mentality has enabled him to effectively 
supplement the rather meagre early training. At 
the age of sixteen Mr. McLeod made his way to 
Massachusetts, for the purpose of learning the trade 
of a monument polisher, but at the expiration of 
eighteen months he came to Gallatin county, Mont., 
arriving in September, 1883, which has since been 
his home and field of operations. Here he secured 
work by the day and later by the month on 
various ranches. Finally he rented land and for five 
years was engaged in farming and stockraising. 
He then took up a claim of government land in 
this county, improving the same and making a fine 
ranch. He made additions to his landed estate 
from time to time, and at the present time is the 
owner of nearly 800 acres. His efforts have been 
admirably directed, and he is considered one of 
the most progressive ranchmen in Gallatin county. 

In his political proclivities Mr. McLeod has 
ever been a stanch supporter of the Democratic 
party in his principles, and his first presidential 
vote was cast for Grover Cleveland, in 1892. At 
the election of November, 1900, his name was 
placed on the party ticket as a candidate for as- 
sessor, in which position he is now serving, having 
secured a flattering endorsement at the polls. He is 
a man of fine physique, is genial and courteous in 
bearing at all times, and his character shows the 
rugged integrity and sturdy intellectual vigor for 
which the fine old Scotch type is notable. He is 
well known and distinctly popular in Gallatin coun- 
ty, and is worthy of all the public honors which 
may be conferred upon him. On January 29, 1891, 
Mr. McLeod was united in marriage to Miss Daisy 
McBroon, who was born in Decatur county, Iowa, 
the daughter of Robert and Susanna (Winters) Mc- 
Broon, natives of Ohio, whence they removed to 
Iowa, where the mother passed away June 20, 
1900 ; the father is a resident of Bozeman. The 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



143 



parents of each were numbered among the early 
pioneers of the old Buckeye state. Mr. and Mrs. 
jNIcLeod have four sons : Elmer C, Ward S., Robert 
and William. 



ARCHIBALD A. McMILLAN.— Leaving home 
at the early age of seventeen to make his own 
way in the world, and developing, by being thus 
early thrown on his own resources, breadth of 
view, resourcefulness and good judgment, Archi- 
bald A. McMillan, of Butte, has a record of con- 
tinuous success and progress to his credit, and has 
built himself up in the esteem and confidence of 
his fellow men while winning the smiles of fortune 
under adverse circumstances. He was bom in 
Glengarry county, near Alexandria, Ont., July 18, 
1853. His parents were Allen and Mary (Camp- 
bell) McMillan, the former born in Glengarry 
county, Ont., and the latter at Inverness, Scotland. 
The father was a faimer and died in his native 
place in 1878, where the mother also died in 1900. 
Mr. McMillan was educated at the public schools 
at Alexandria, Ont., and when seventeen went to 
Potter county. Pa., and engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness for eight years. The next two he passed on 
the home farm in Ontario. On June 9, 1880, he 
located at Butte, Mont., where he established a 
blacksmith shop on East Park street, near Main, 
which he conducted for four years. He then bought 
property on Park and Wyoming streets and opened 
a grain and feed store, remaining in that business 
ten years, at the end of which time he closed the 
business, but still owns the property. At the spring 
election in 1895 he was elected city clerk and 
served two years during Mayor Thompson's ad- 
ministration. After the winter of 1897, passed in 
California, he returned to Butte and has since de- 
voted his attention to his extensive real estate busi- 
ness, erecting dwellings and business blocks on 
numerous valuable lots which he owns in different 
parts of the city, having invested largely in real es- 
tate when the city was in its infancy. His residence 
on West Granite street is a model structure, planned 
and mostly built by himself, and cost about $10,000. 
In addition to his property within the city proper 
he owns 160 acres on the flats, which will some 
day become a community of homes. In 1898 he 
engaged in the real estate business in partnership 
with John Floyd, continuing until June i, 1901, 
when they sold out to Conroy & O'Brien. Mr. Mc- 
Millan has also numerous mining interests, includ- 



ing a one-third interest in the Pacific mine located 
near the Columbia Gardens, Butte (which is now be- 
ing successfully worked), and numerous undevel- 
oped claims in different parts of the state. His ven- 
tures in real estate have always been successful and 
immensely profitable. He buys with judgment and 
sells in the same way. The bulk of his holdings 
were purchased when the property was very cheap, 
and have been kept until it has advanced enor- 
mously. 

In politics he is a Republican, and as such repre- 
sented the Third ward in the city council as alder- 
man in 1883 and 1884, and was a member of the 
board of education from the First district in 1892 
and 1893. He is a member of Oswego Lodge, 
K. of P., and Butte Lodge, A. O. U. W. On Sep- 
tember 21, 1897, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Elma L. Passmore, a native of Maryland. 
They have two children, a boy and a girl. 



A LEXANDER R. MoKENZIE.— Having charge 
ii of the converters of the great B. & M. smelter 
in Great Falls, and a recognized expert in his voca- 
tion, Mr. McKenzie is a man of progressive ideas 
and marked practical ability. He comes from the 
clan McKenzie, long honored in Scottish song and 
story, and was born in County Inverness, Nova 
Scotia, on April 30, 1852. His father, John iVlc- 
Kenzie, was a native of the same place, and died 
in West Virginia in 1897, in the fullness of years 
and honors. His wife, Jane (Ross) McKenzie, 
likewise of Scottish lineage, was born in Inverness 
county, N. S., where she died in 1890. 

Alexander R. McKenzie received his education in 
the schools of Inverness, graduating in the high 
school class of 1870. He was employed at the coal 
mines of Nova Scotia until 1875, when he came to 
Eureka, Nev., and for two years worked in the 
Richmond Consolidated Smelters. In 1877 he went 
to the Martin White smelter, at Ward, Nev., and 
two years later was feeder and tapper in the Horn 
Silver smelter at Frisco, L'tah, holding this incum- 
bency also for two years. In 1882 he located in 
Butte, where, as he states, he "packed a hod for 
about five months," after which, in February, 1883, 
he was nine years with the Parrott ]\Iining Com- 
pany. He was at first foreman of the reverberatory 
and calcining departments but, when converters 
were installed, he successfully introduced the Bes- 
semerizing of copper and is known as one of the 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



leading- experts in this line. In 1890 Mr. McKen- 
zie ran the converters at Sudbury, Ont., for the 
Canadian Copper Company for one year, and in 
the fall of 1 89 1 he came to Great Falls, where he 
has since had charge of the converters at the Bos- 
ton & Montana smelter. He was made a citizen of 
the United States in 1882, and has since given 
support to the Republican party. Fraternally he is 
identified with Enterprise Lodge, I. O. O. F., at 
Butte, and with Cataract Lodge, K. of P., in Great 
Falls, joining the latter by card from Oswego 
Lodge of Butte. In 1885 Mr. McKenzie was 
married to Miss Mary McKenzie, daughter of John 
McKenzie, an extensive farmer of Nova Scotia, 
and their children are Jane, Bryant and William. 



HANSON H. BARNES.— The eldest of the 
family of Amos, Jr., and Mary (Andrews) 
Barnes, Hanson H. Barnes was born in Camden, 
Me., on June 15, 1835. The lineage is that of New 
England's earliest citizens, and of good English 
stock. His grandfather, Amos Barnes, of Cam- 
den, was, like others of the family, a typical Yan- 
kee, energetic, resolute, quick in thought and 
action, and a man well-to-do. Amos Barnes, Jr., 
carried on a sterile Maine farm until the early 
'fifties, when he came to California, where he died 
about 1864. The early childhood of Hanson H. 
Barnes was characterized and dominated by two 
thoughts, to investigate and go to the bottom of 
every unknown thing, and make his own demon- 
strations rather than accept the ipse dixit of an- 
other ; the second was an ardent love of primitive 
nature in all forms, including a passionate fond- 
ness for the sea. Under the right conditions and 
in the right environment he might have been a 
poet — not a dreamy society warbler, but an in- 
spirer of action — an interpreter of nature's wild- 
est expressions in ocean, mountain, the far- 
stretching western plains, and the ice-bound 
shores of lone, vast, wave-washed continents. 
His published letters from Alaska are graphic, 
minute and wonderfully attractive. 

At the age of twelve he became a sailor, and for 
four years followed the sea in coasting voyages, 
some of them reaching' South America. When 
sixteen he went to California from Camden, via 
the Panama route, sailing from New York. He 
arrived at San Francisco in December, 1852, when 
the gold excitement ran so high that entire crews 



of vessels deserted to go to the mines. Within an 
hour after his arrival he was offered $100 a month 
to ship on a return voyage with five $20 gold 
pieces paid in advance. Witness the maturity 
of the boy ! He thought that if his services were 
worth that in San Francisco, they must be worth 
more at the mines. He declined the offer and 
devoted himself to mining, which became his life 
work. His operations were principally in Tuol- 
umne county, and were pursued with vigor and not 
confined to mining; before he was nineteen 
he purchased and successfully conducted a store 
at Stevens' Bar. Before he was of age he had 
earned a competency and in 1856 he returned to 
Maine, passed six months in school, cast his first 
vote for James Buchanan for president, not as a 
Democrat, for such he never was, but because he 
did not approve of Fremont's actions in Cali- 
fornia, married and went back to Tuolumne coun- 
ty, and resumed mining and other activities. Suc- 
cess was attending his efforts when he was treated 
to one of those plays Dame Fortune sometimes 
gives to men. By the first great flood of the 
mining days in California he was brought from 
affluence to poverty in a night. The swollen river 
reduced the prosperous camp to chaos, carrying 
off bridges, tearing out the houses, and leaving in 
place of the rich placer beds which it swept away, 
an immense deposit of rocks and sand. A gigan- 
tic boulder, washed down from the mountain im- 
mediately back of his house, crashed through it as 
if it were an eggshell. 

The place was abandoned and Mr. Barnes, 
thankful that their lives were spared, came north, 
first to Oregon, crossing the dreary Humboldt 
desert, and then on to Idaho in 1862. Here he 
mined u\ Boise basin with varying success until 
1865 and then came to Diamond City, in Montana, 
where he resided until 1881. There his wife died 
in 1877. There also he was clerk of the court of 
]\Ieagher county for a long time ; and when the 
county seat was moved to White Sulphur Springs, 
his official duties caused him to remove thither. 
While living at Diamond City he had mining prop- 
erties in various parts of Montana, held large in- 
terests in Copperopolis before White Sulphur 
Springs had being, and was considered one of the 
best, perhaps the best, placer miner of the state. 
He was often employed as a mining expert and 
surveyor and as a prospector. The first years of 
his life at the springs he was prospecting for a 
mining syndicate. In 1887 he was one of the 




H. H. Barnes 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



145 



founders of the town of Castle, and gave it its 
name He was its first postmaster, holding that 
office six years. There he was superintendent of 
a large mining proposition. In 1886, ten years be- 
fore the gold excitement, Alaska attracted his at- 
tention and he went there, staying nearly a year. 
In 1893 his health began to fail, and his last work 
was done in 1898 as superintendent of the King 
niine in Diamond City. Going to California in 
I goo in the vain hope of recovering his health, he 
bought a farm in Tuolumne county, his old home, 
but was taken ill on the day the conveyance was 
made and never recovered. 

.Anxious to be with his old friends at the 
Springs, he returned to Montana in July, 1900, 
and gradually weakened, despite the assiduous 
care of his devoted wife and friends until the end 
came, peacefully, on January 10, 1901. In 1884 
he was married with Miss Alice S. Nichols, a New 
Hampshire girl, who came to the Springs in 1881 
as a teacher.' In 1882 she was elected county super- 
intendent of Meagher county, one of the first two 
ladies elected to that position in Montana, Miss 
Helen Clark, of Helena, being elected at the same 
time. His harmonious marriage added much to 
the brightness of the life of Mr. Barnes, and in the 
Christian life and work of his wife he took great 
pride. Mr. Barnes was a Freemason and an Odd 
Fellow. The former order he joined at Diamond 
City, and went with his lodge to the Springs when 
it was removed thither. His Odd Fellow mem- 
bership was with Helena Lodge No. i. At his re- 
quest a monument of rough granite marks his 
_ resting place. On its face are carved the emblems 
of his vocation, a miner's pick and shovel, crossed, 
with a miner's pan beneath containing a few gold 
nuggets. Mr. Barnes was proud in being an "old- 
timer," and highly valued his membership in the 
Montana Pioneer Association. His character 
was capitally drawn in the funeral sermon 
preached by Rev. W. S. Bell, in these words : 

"He had the qualities of heart and of life char- 
acteristic of his class, hatred of shams, fidelity to 
friends, unswerving honesty, business integrity, 
all tending to make him respected and honored. 
As little bent into artificial forms as the mountains 
over which he roamed, as free of artificial re- 
straints as the air he breathed, he had little use for 
set phrases or so-called polite forms of speech. 
He was blunt, truthful, sincere. He was one who, 
as Garfield once said, would 'look the devil in the 
face and tell him he was a devil.' Like all 'old- 



timers' he hated shams with the intensity of Car- 
lyle, despised pretence and cant, but none ever 
had greater reverence for true worth and piety." 



TAMES G. McKAY, M. D., C. M.— Who shall 
J estimate the extent of useful service which a 
physician and surgeon renders to the community 
in which his life is spent ? He goes about his way, 
unostentatiously and faithfully performing the 
daily. duties found ever at one's elbow, affording to 
those who have the benefit of his ministrations 
solace in sorrow, relief in suffering, cheerfulness 
in gloom and often consolation in death. Such 
a public servant and benefactor is Dr. James G. 
McKay, one of the most active and best known 
practicing physicians and surgeons of Big Tim- 
ber. He was born at Winchester, Ontario, March 
21, 1876, a son of William McKay and Minnie 
(Gillespie) McKay, the former born in Winchester 
and the latter a native of Aberdeen, Scotland. 
His paternal grandfather came to America as 
an orphan boy and located in Ottawa, Canada, 
where he secured employment in the service of 
Hamilton Brothers, who were conducting an ex- 
tensive lumber business. He rose by his merit 
and attention to business from one position to 
another until he became the head man in the 
firm's employ, and completed more than twenty 
years of useful service. His son, the Doctor's 
father, is a successful and prosperous farmer at 
Winchester, Ontario. 

Dr. McKay was educated in the public schools 
of his native city and at the Ottawa Collegiate 
Institute, from which he was graduated in 1893. 
He also attended the Kemptville high school at 
Ontario. In 1895 he entered the medical depart- 
ment of McGill University at Montreal, and after 
a full and exhaustive course of instruction, was 
graduated in 1899 with the degree of M. D., C. M. 
He began the practice of his profession at Pots- 
dam, N. Y., in association with his uncle, Dr. 
James S. McKay. After three months spent at 
Potsdam, he came to Montana, locating in Big 
Timber after having spent some months at Miles 
City with another uncle, Hon. J. R. McKay, and 
then passed an examination before the state 
board of medical examiners at Helena. In his 
present home he was soon accepted by the citizens 
as a young man of great promise and capacity; 
skillful and careful in his business and of sterling 



1 146 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



worth as a citizen. His affability and obliging 
disposition gained him friends rapidly, and his 
practice soon became one of the largest and most 
lucrative in the county. Although he is yet a 
comparatively young man, his standing in his pro- 
fession and in the good opinion of the people 
of his county is such as is usually only the result 
of years of faithful practice. Socially he is genial 
and entertaining — a desired addition to any com- 
pany. The fraternal orders of which he is a mem- 
ber are the Freemasons, the Elks and the Knights 
of Pythias. 



16, 1892, leaving one child, Lillian Chloe, and on 
December 2, 1893, Mr. McKcown wedded with 
Miss Catherine Kitts, of County Renfrew, Ont., 
daughter of William Kitts, of Ottawa, Canada. 
Their two children are William George and Charles 
Greenless. 



WILLIAM McKEOWN, one of the most suc- 
cessful and prominent stockraisers of Jeffer- 
son county, Mont., is a resident of Jefferson Island 
and was born in Peterboro, Ont., Canada, on April 
13, 1849. His parents were William J. and Jane 
(Cardwell) McKeown, natives of Ireland, Mrs. 
McKeown being a sister of Hon. Edward Cardwell, 
of Montana. The family emigrated to the United 
States but located in Ontario, where the father en- 
gaged in stockraising and died in 1883. The early 
life of William McKeown was passed in attendance 
at the public schools of Ontario, and after his school 
days were over he started to join his uncle, Edward 
Cardwell, at Virginia City, Mont. He made the 
trip up the Missouri to Fort Benton and ow- 
ing to a series of accidents the passage occupied 
sixty-three days. At the mouth of the Little Muddy 
they were attacked by Indians, who fired several 
shots at the pilot house and, while there were a num- 
ber of narrow escapes, no one was injured. 

Arriving at Virginia City Mr. McKeown went 
with his uncle to his ranch on Jefferson Island, 
where he remained two years, learning by ex- 
perience the stock business as conducted in Mon- 
tana. He then returned to Virginia City and worked 
in the mines for one year. Meanwhile his parents 
had returned to Ireland and Mr. McKeown made a 
trip thither to visit them. So well had he pros- 
pered in the new home of his adoption, however, 
that previous to his departure he purchased the 
ranch which he now occupies, and on his return to 
the territory he engaged extensively in stockraising 
and now usually winters from 300 to 500 head of 
cattle. He has been a school trustee for several 
years and belongs to the United Workmen. In 
September, 1891, ]\Ir. McKeown was married to 
Miss Ora Austin, daughter of W. W. Austin, M. 
D., of Selina county, 111. She died on September 



GEORGE MoKNIGHT, one of the leading citi- 
zens of Townsend, can be said to be one of the 
prominent pioneers of the state, coming here in 
1864, when he was only one year old. He was 
born in Johnson county, Iowa, in December, 1863, 
the son of Patrick McKnight, a native of Ireland, 
who, after emigrating to America, made his home 
in New York for a number of years, where he 
married a lady of Irish birth. Miss Winnifred 
Green. They made their first home in Richmond, 
Ind., where Mr. McKnight was employed at his 
trade, that of a blacksmith. After a year had 
passed they removed to Iowa City, in Johnson 
county, Iowa, where he worked steadly at his trade 
for several years, until he determined to go west. 
It was in 1864 that he went to Denver, Colo., in an 
ox train, shortly afterward, however, removing to 
Virginia City, Mont. 

On their westward journey the party experienced 
no trouble with the Indians, then in great numbers 
on the plains. At Virginia City Patrick McKnight 
carried on general blacksmithing in partnership 
with one Walsh. In 1866 the partners removed to 
Helena, continuing the partnership until 1871. Mr. 
McKnight then returned to Missouri valley, locat- 
ing near the present site of Townsend, and here. 
he was prospered in the blacksmith business until 
1879, working also three years in Diamond City. 
In 1875 he purchased the ranch about a mile from 
Townsend on which he so long resided and which 
he developed until it is now a beautiful property. 
He died on December 11, 1895, leaving two sons 
and four daughters and his wife as survivors. 

George McKnight received his education in 
Townsend and Diamond City. From his youth up 
he has always taken a lively interest in stockraising, 
usually wintering from 200 to 400 head of cattle. 
For a number of years he has had and continues 
in full charge of the homestead. The family resi- 
dence is a modern edifice of elegant architectural 
design and the ranch is well provided with ample 
barns and necessary appurtenances to carry on 
the extensive stockraising business in which Mr. 
McKnight is engaged. There is a general appear- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"47 



ance 



„..^^ of prosperit}' about the place that is rarely 
seen in so high a degree in this portion of the west. 
Everything about the place indicates industry, su- 
perior business sagacity and prosperity. It is a 
home of which anyone might be proud. 



MATHEW MADISON.— In the personnel of 
Montana's population are to be found repre- 
sentatives of nearly all quarters of the civilized 
world. Sons of the far Norseland, whose sterling 
characteristics are in evidence wherever found, are 
here in evidence, and Mr. Madison is a notable rep- 
resentative. He is specially known among the pro- 
gressive farmers and stockgrowers of Carbon 
county, his ranch lying close to the line between 
that county and that of Sweet Grass. 

Mr. Madison is a native of Denmark, having 
been born in Bornholm, April 20, 1858, the son 
of Peter and Margaret Madison, natives of the same 
district. In 1873 the father of our subject re- 
moved with his family to America, locating in Illi- 
nois, where he resided until 1899, when he came to 
Montana and settled on a ranch adjoining that 
of his son, hut in Carbon county, where he 
and his wife now maintain their home. In 
the excellent public schools of his native 
land the subject of this review received 
his early educational training, and accompanied his 
parents on their removal to America. He remained 
at the paternal home about one year, and then en- 
gaged in farming for six years. Having accumu- 
lated some means he purchased a farm in LaSalle 
county, 111., which he cultivated until 1881, meeting 
with fair success. In that year he disposed of his 
interests and came to Montana, where he has been 
a resident for two decades. He first located at 
White Sulphur Springs, Meagher county, making it 
his headquarters until the spring of 1893. Within 
this interval he was engaged in various pursuits ; 
he had charge of a large sheep ranch for several 
years, located on Willow creek, owned and operated 
by Dr. Parberry. He finally resigned this position 
and moved to the valley of the Stillwater river, Car- 
bon county, locating upon his present ranch, eight 
miles west of the village of Absarokee, his post- 
ofiice address. He now has a valuable landed es- 
tate of 480 acres, situated on both sides of the Still- 
water river, which constitutes the dividing line be- 
tween the counties of Carbon and Sweet Grass, but 
in the latter is located his home. Upon taking up 



his residence here Mr. Madison engaged in the 
sheep business, which he has successfully conducted, 
his average flocks aggregating 7,000 head. For the 
past year or more he has given considerable atten- 
tion to the raising of high-grade cattle, having now 
about 500 head. In 1894 Mr. Madison admitted 
his brother-in-law, Qiarles Rehm, to partnership in 
his business, under the firm name of Madison & 
Rehm, and this association still continues, his part- 
ner proving an able coadjutor. Our subject has 
made excellent improvements upon his ranch, includ- 
ing a modern two-story residence, good bams and 
other requisite outbuildings. 

Mr. Madison gives but little attention to politics, 
his time being strictly devoted to his ranch and im- 
mense herds of sheep and cattle. On March 10, 
1886, Mr. Madison was united in marriage to Miss 
Amelia Rehm, who was born in Illinois, the daugh- 
ter of Jacob Rehm, a native of Germany, whence 
he emigrated when a young man, locating in Illi- 
nois, where he has since maintained his home. Mr. 
and Mrs. Madison are the parents of four interest- 
ing children, namely : Cora Leona, Walter Mathew, 
Esther A^ola and Lottie May. 



JOHN McRx\E. — This progressive, enterprising 
and public-spirited gentleman presents in his 
career as a business man and a leading citizen a 
pleasing theme for the pen of the annalist, and is a 
striking example of what is possible to industry in 
this land of almost boundless opportunity. 

Mr. McRae was born in Scotland, January i, 
1856. His parents were Donald and Margaret Mc- 
Rae, natives of Scotland, where the father was a 
prosperous farmer until his death, which occurred 
in 1878. His widow, the mother of our subject, 
is still living in her native land. He was educated 
in the schools of Scotland and came to the United 
States when he was twenty-five years old, locating 
first in Texas, where he was employed for about 
three years on the stock ranch of Adam T. Brown. 
In 1884 he came to Montana and worked for two 
years on a ranch on Tongue river. In 1886 he 
bought a ranch on the Rosebud river about fifty 
miles from Forsyth, where he was engaged in rais- 
ing stock for a period of three years, but sold the 
place to John Davidson. In 1889 he purchased 
the improvements on a squatter's claim a few miles 
farther down the Rosebud valley, which he has 
since made his home and added to his original pur- 



1 148 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



chase adjoining lands in the valley and on sur- 
rounding prairies until he now has a ranch of 5,980 
acres', besides a pleasant homestead of 160 acres 
eight miles south on the Rosebud. He is one of 
the largest land and stock owners in this fertile 
valley, having immense herds of sheep and cattle, 
and harvesting large crops of grain and hay. 

In 1897 Mr. McRae embarked in the mercantile 
business at Rosebud and Forsyth, conducting the 
business under the name of the McRae Supply 
Company. The two stores were consolidated in 
1900, and the business has been continued at Rose- 
bud under the name of the iMcRae Mercantile 
Company, under the management of his nephew, 
Roderick McRae. 

In politics Mr. McRae is a Republican, and takes 
an active interest in the afifairs of his party. He 
was married in Ontario, Canada, in 1891, to Miss 
Catherine McRae, a native of that province. They 
have five children, namely: Maggie, Katie Lillie, 
Mary Catherine, Evan Douglas and Donald Ken- 
neth. 



pHARLES E. MAHANA.— Taking advantage 
^' of the opportunities afforded for enterprise in 
connection with the industrial activities of Fergus 
county, this gentleman has here been successful in 
his efforts, and is a leading stockraiser. 

He is a native of Meigs county, Ohio, born on the 
i8th of March, 1855, the son of Asher B. and 
Mary E. Mahana, the former of whom was born 
in West Virginia and the latter in Ohio. Asher 
B. Mahana was among those valiant argonauts who 
went to California in 1849. He continued his 
family residence in Ohio, however, until 1853, when 
it was changed to Whiteside county. III, where Mr. 
Mahana devoted the remainder of his life to ag- 
riculture. In California he had been engaged in 
placer mining and in the sawmill business. He 
was a stalwart Republican, a Freemason, and with 
his wife held membership in the Christian church. 
Three of their seven children are deceased. Mrs. 
Mahana died in 1896, Mr. Mahana in 1898. 

Charles E. Mahana, at the early age of nine, 
began to render assistance to his father, and re- 
mained at the parental home until he was of age, 
when he engaged in rafting logs and lumber on 
the Mississippi for one season and then engaged 
in fanning in Whiteside county. 111., until 1888, 
when he decided to come to Montana. Soon after 
his arrival here Mr. Mahana took up a pre-emption 



claim on Casino creek, Fergus county, and engaged 
in stockraising until 1895, when he entered into 
partnership with John Nodson and purchased a 
ranch of 320 acres on Cottonwood creek, twelve 
miles south of the village of Cottonwood and 
eighteen miles from Lewistown. One year later 
]\Ir. Mahana purchased his partner's interests and 
has since continued farming and stockraising. One 
hundred and twenty acres of this ranch are avail- 
able for cultivation. His stock is now (December, 
1901 ) fifty horses and 100 head of cattle. His chief 
production is cattle. In politics Mr. Mahana is a 
Republican. 

On the I2th of September, 1878, Mr. Mahana 
was united in marriage with Miss Emma Baker, 
who was born in Whiteside county, 111., the daugh- 
ter of Zachariah and Mary Baker, both natives of 
Ohio. The father was a shoemaker and also gave 
careful attention to the raising of bees and fruit, 
in both of which lines he was very successful. He 
was a supporter of the Democratic party, and a 
member of the Universalist church, as was also his 
wife. His death occurred in 1885, his wife sur- 
viving until 1889. Of their thirteen children Ma- 
linda and Benjamin are deceased, the others being 
Jane, Nathaniel, Elizabeth, George, Zachariah, 
Mary, Emma, Dora, Altana, Frances and Cora B. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mahana have six children, Bert, Katie 
M., Nellie S., WiUiam C, Fred E. and Dora M. 



ALEXANDER MACAULAY.— The land of 
Scott and Burns has given to America many 
energetic and progressive men who have helped in 
developing her resources and making them service- 
able to mankind, and among the number Alexander 
Macaulay, of Butte, stands high on the roll. He 
was born at Keith, in Banshire, Scotland, February 
24, i860. His parents were Kenneth and Jessie 
(Morrison) Macaulay, who came to America in 
1883. The father was a fisherman in his native 
land, but in the United States, having settled in 
Alpena, Mich., was employed in the lodging camps 
of that neighborhood until his death on August 
15, 1901. His wife died at the sam€ place in 1884. 
Their son Alexander was educated in the Free 
Church schools of his native town, and after his 
arrival in Alpena, Mich., in 1879, worked at the 
trade of harnessmaking, which he had learned in 
Scotland. On November i, 1888, he came with his 
father-in-law, F. D. Spratt, and his brother, A. 



PROGRESSH'E MEN OF MONTANA. 



"49 



Spratt, to JNIontana, and worked in the well known 
gold and sapphire mines at Eldorado bar, about 
twenty miles from Helena. They worked these 
mines successfully for six years and then sold them 
to a syndicate. In 1894 Mr. McCaulay opened a 
harnessmaking- establishment in Helena, which he 
conducted profitably until 1897. In that year he 
removed to Butte, bought the Chris. Jackey har- 
ness emporium, and has since then been in sole 
control of the establishment. He also holds an in- 
terest in the sapphire mines at Eldorado bar. In poli- 
tics he is an active Republican and takes an earnest 
and prominent part in political affairs. His frater- 
nal affiliation is with the order of Modern Wood- 
men, his membership being in Silver Bow Camp. 
He is also president of the Bankers' Union of the 
World, the Bobby Burns Club, of Butte, and a 
member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
He was married at Alpena, Mich., in 1887, to ]\Iiss 
Ida E. Spratt, a native of Maine, where she was 
born in 1864. They have four children : Jessie 
Louise, Donald A., Cora and Francis Kenneth. Mr. 
Macaulay has been eminently successful in his busi- 
ness operations, and has secured a firm hold on 
the esteem of his fellow citizens. Both in private 
life and in a public way he has exhibited an elevated 
manhood, exemplif3'ing the best elements of Amer- 
ican citizenship. 



T GUIS MARCOTTE.— The extensive ranch of 
i-> 1,520 acres situated one mile west of Craig, in 
Lewis and Clarke county, is the property of the en- 
terprising Louis Marcotte. He is one of the 
earliest of Montana pioneers, .was among the first 
successful ranchers of the Prickly Pear valley, and 
is one of the state's progressive and successful 
men. He was born at Two jMartin, Canada, on 
August II, 1837. the son of Joseph and Amelia 
!\Iarcotte, both natives of Canada. The father 
throughout his lifetime was successfully engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. Joseph Marcotte died in 
1844 and was followed by his wife in 1882, and 
both were members of the Catholic church. The 
son, Louis, at an early age began work on the farm 
and here he remained until he was nineteen years 
of age. Then he crossed the plains to Colorado, 
the trip occupying two months. He there engaged 
in quartz mining, receiving $1.50 per day and 
board, and in the spring of 1864 he drifted north 
to Montana with three other Canadians. Thev 



drove three yoke of oxen on a journey which re- 
quired three months to complete it. Their initial 
stop was at \'irginia City, but they soon pushed on 
with pack horses to the British possessions where 
Mr. Marcotte engaged in placer mining, receiving 
S5.00 per day and board. He remained there 
three months and came to Frenchtown, Mont., 
where he passed the winter. 

In the spring of 1865 Mr. Marcotte made a 
trip to Silver Bow county, but the location did not 
please him and he came north to Blackfoot, then 
Hover gulch, and again engaged in mining for 
$5.00 a day, which was the prevailing price for 
that labor. In the fall of 1865 he was in Helena, 
and then moved over to Sun river. There was 
then a wild stampede to a certain section where 
report said a rich strike had been made, but Mr. 
^larcotte quietly wintered at Dearborn, and in the 
spring of 1866 he passed over to Canyon creek 
and mined during the summer. He passed the 
winter in L'tah and in the spring purchased two 
teams and engaged in freighting, and also car- 
ried passengers to a number of points. In this 
lucrative business he continued three years. 
Eventually he disposed of his freighting outfit and 
returned to Montana, locating in Prickly Pear val- 
ley. Here he first became interested in the cattle 
business. Beginning with thirty head he at the 
end of the year removed to Sun river, near Hay- 
stack butte, for another year and then went to 
Dearborn crossing where he resided six success- 
ful years. He then went to Fort Benton, disposing 
of his stock interests for $7,830. He then engaged 
in an enterprise that netted him a considerable 
amount of money. He went to Oregon, purchased 
stock, mostly horses and cattle, and brought them 
to Montana, selling them at a handsome profit, and 
in this line he continued four years. His home is 
now on his present fine ranch, one mile east of 
Craig. He possesses the confidence and esteem of 
his neighbors, is a member of the Catholic church 
and an active Democrat. 



T SADORE MARCOTTE, a native of the prov- 
l ince of Quebec, Canada, where he was born in 

1836, is one of the successful and prosperous ranch- 
men of northern Montana, whose career illustrates 
in a forcible way the almost limitless possibilities of 
American manhood. His father, Godfrey Mar- 
cotte, was born at the same place and died there De- 



I ISO 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



cember 25, 1859. He was of French descent, a 
butcher by trade, and a man in good circumstances ; 
of liberal views and a progressive spirit. His wife, 
the mother of our subject, Louise (LeSage) Mar- 
cotte, was also a native of Quebec, dying in 1845. 

Mr. Marcotte was educated at the Brothers' 
School at Three Rivers, Canada, and after leaving 
school followed rafting on the St. Mary's river for 
five years. In i860 he bought a farm in the prov- 
ince of Quebec and operated it for seventeen years. 
In 1880 he came to Montana and located a home- 
stead on the Teton river, twelve miles from Fort 
Benton, to which he has since added by various pur- 
chases at different times until he now has a fine 
ranch of 640 acres devoted to cattle raising and gen- 
eral farming, in both of which he has prospered 
greatly, and in them has found scope for the energies 
of a naturally active and inquiring mind. 

Mr. Marcotte was married in Quebec, in 1854, to 
Miss Esther Lessard, a native of that province. 
Eight children have been born to them, namely : 
Esther, wife of Treffle A'allette, a stockraiser on 
the Teton ; Sarah, wife of Amie Lapine, rancher on 
the Teton; Camille, wife of Victor Conteant, car- 
penter at Lewistown ; Menie, widow of Leander Bi- 
ron ; Louisa and Angeline, who died in infancy ; and 
Lula and John, who are still at home with their 
parents. As he approaches the sunset of life, Mr. 
Marcotte can look back with comfort over a record 
of duties faithfully performed and opportunities 
promptly seized and fully used. His influence on 
the public thought and enterprise of the community 
has been healthy and productive of much good, and 
he is, as he deserves to be, a highly esteemed citizen. 



TOSEPHUS P. MARTIN.— One of the most 
J venerable and honored citizens of Bozeman, 
Gallatin county, Mont., is the above-named gentle- 
man, whose career has been distinguished for use- 
fulness. Judge Martin was one of the many bold 
argonauts who made their way to California at the 
time of the memorable gold excitement in 1849, 
braving the perils and hardships of the plains and 
mountains or the almost equally hazardous trip by 
the isthmus route in order to reach the new Eldo- 
rado. Judge Martin is a native son of Kentucky, 
having been born in Harrison county, on January 
4, 1825, the son of William and Catherine C. 
fPerrin) Martin, who were married March 7, 
1822. William Martin was a native of Hagers- 



town, born January 4, 1790, whence he removed to 
Harrison county, Ky., where his death occurred in 
1832, at the age of forty-two years. He was a 
farmer and a carpenter by occupation, and well 
known as a man of sterling character. The mother 
of our subject was born in Harrison county, April 
5, 1802, and there passed her entire life. William 
and Catherine C. Martin were the parents of five 
children, of whom three survive. Josephus P. 
Martin was reared on a farm amid such environ- 
ments as brings one in closer contact with nature, 
and gaining thereby a high regard for the dignity 
of honest toil. He received such education as the 
district schools afforded, and thereby laid the foun- 
dation for that information which has come to him 
in later years. After crossing the plains to Cali- 
fornia in 1849 he first setded at Placerville, then 
known as Hangtown, where he learned the profes- 
sion of pharmacist, and engaged in the drug busi- 
ness thereafter in California for thirty years, being 
located the greater portion of that time at San Jose. 
In 1879 Mr. Martin came to Bozeman, Mont., and 
held a clerical position in a drug store, after which 
he was chosen probate judge for a term of two 
years, and served in other positions of trust and 
responsibility. For more than a decade he has been 
public administrator of the county, and has ably 
and satisfactorily administered the duties of this 
office. In politics he has ever rendered allegiance 
to the Democratic party, his first vote, however, 
having been cast in support of Gen. Zachary Taylor. 
In his fraternal relations Judge Martin is identi- 
fied with the Masonic order, in which he is un- 
doubtedly one of the oldest representatives in the 
state, having become an entered apprentice as early 
as 1846, and advanced to higher degree in the time- 
honored fraternity of whose principles he is a 
worthy exemplar. Judge Martin has ordered his 
life upon a lofty plane of rectitude and inflexible 
honor, and in Gallatin county there is no citizen 
who retains to a greater degree the confidence and 
high regard of all classes. His life has been one of 
signal probity and usefulness, and he stands well 
to the front among the representative men of Gal- 
latin county. On October 7, 1856, Judge Martin 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary Langhorne, 
who was born in Virginia September 7. 1839, the 
daughter of John W. and Martha N. (Branch) 
Langhorne, natives of the Old Dominion, but 
among the early pioneers of California, where the 
former died at the advanced age of seventy-five 
}cars. his widow passing away in Missouri. They 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



tSi 



were the parents of four children, two of whom 
are now living. To Judge and Mrs. iMartin nine 
children have been born, three of the number being 
deceased. Of those living, Kate N. is the wife of 
Thomas Lewis, to whom individual reference is 
made on other pages of this work; John P. is 
married and has one child; Daisy is married and 
has three children ; William L. is married ; and 
Maude and Alice remain at the parental home, the 
former being an assistant in the Bozeman post- 
office and the latter a teacher in the public schools. 



T OH-N L. MARYOTT.— Three miles to the north 
J of the thriving little city of Red Lodge, Carbon 
county, Mont., is located the fine ranch property 
of this well known and progressive representative 
of the fanning and stockgrowing interests, and 
such has been his success since coming to Montana 
that he has reason to view with much pride the 
confidence and esteem of the community in which 
he has made his home since 1886. John L. Maryott 
is a native of Susquehanna county. Pa., where he 
was born December 14, 1863, the fifth of the eight 
children of Anson A. and Abigail (Lyman) 
Maryott, natives of the same county. William 
Maryott, the grandfather of our subject, was a 
native of Connecticut, the original American an- 
cestors having settled in New England in the early 
colonial epoch. William Maryott emigrated thence 
and became one of the pioneers of Susquehanna 
county, Pa., where he passed the residue of his 
life engaged in agricultural pursuits. He was a 
man of sterling character and was an active par- 
ticipant in the war of 1812. The parents of our 
subject still reside in their native county, where 
the father has devoted his active years to agricul- 
ture, but now practically retired at the venerable 
age of eighty years. 

To the public schools of his native county John 
L. Maryott is indebted for his early educational 
privileges, and when seventeen years of age he 
came west to Nebraska, joining his uncle, Thomas 
W. Lyman, then engaged in the banking business 
in Fremont. In that city our subject attended 
school for some time, remaining about four years, 
partially employed in the banking house with his 
uncle. In the year 1886 Mr. Maryott came to 
Montana and took up a homestead claim three 
miles north of Red Lodge, Carbon county, the 
nucleus of his present valuable ranch property, 
which aggregates more than 600 acres, the major 



portion being under effective irrigation. Here he 
secures large annual yields of clover and harvests 
excellent crops of grain. He is also largely in- 
terested in raising high-bred shorthorn cattle, hav- 
ing some fine thoroughbred stock, and also suc- 
cessfully conducts a dairying business of consider- 
able importance. He has made the best of im- 
provements upon his ranch, including a fine two- 
story residence with mansard roof, completed 
within the past few months, together with com- 
modious barns and other necessary outbuildings. 
In politics he gives his support to the Republican 
party; fraternally he is identified with the Royal 
Highlanders, holding membership in Cluny 
Castle No. 281, at Red Lodge. On November 15, 
1893, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. ]\Iaryott 
to Miss Nellie Luce, who was born in Susquehanna 
county. Pa., the daughter of Abram Luce, who 
was one of the influential farmers of that county, 
where his death occurred in the month of October, 
1901. Mr. and Mrs. Maryott are the parents of 
three sons : Lucius, Thomas and Abram. 



JOHN R. MASON.— Among the leading farmers 
and sheep growers of Fergus county is Mr. 
Mason, whose prosperity is of his own building 
and who is clearly entitled to the frequently mis- 
applied title of self-made man. 

Mr. Mason was born in Erie county. Pa., on the 
1 8th of April, 1852, the son of William and 
Armenia Mason, who wefe likewise bom in the 
county mentioned. Thence they removed to 
Chautauqua county, N. Y.. locating in the city of 
Jamestown, where the father has since devoted his 
attention successfully to the tinner's trade. He 
is a Republican and both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. They are 
the parents of three children : William S., who is 
engaged in ranching and stockgrowing near 
Lewistown; Mont. ; John R., and Charles. 

The early education of John R. Mason was re- 
ceived in the public schools of Pennsylvania and 
from the age of sixteen he has been entirely de- 
pendent upon his own resources. After leaving 
school he devoted the first two years to farm work 
and then entered a tin shop to learn the tinner's 
trade, but his health became impaired and he was 
compelled to relinquish this vocation. He then 
traveled for four years through New York, Penn- 
sylvania, Ohio and West Virginia for a firm of 
lightning-rod manufacturers, after which he en- 



'52 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



gaged in farming in Amity townsliip, Erie county, 
Pa., for several years. He now determined to cast 
in his lot with Montana, and arrived in the ter- 
ritory on the 29th of June, 1880, coming to Helena 
and there securing employment on a ranch in the 
Prickly Pear valley, near the city. Later he was 
employed in the flouring mill of Sanford & Evans 
near the mouth of the Prickly Pear, receiving $40 
per month. On the 15th of June, 1881, Mr. Mason 
came to Fergus county, locating fifteen miles west 
of Lewistown, where he took up all claims allowed 
him by the government and to these he has since 
added by purchase until he now has 1,500 acres of 
deeded land, of which 1,000 acres are available for 
cultivation, with a most effective water supply for 
irrigation purposes. In addition to this fine and 
well improved ranch property Mr. Mason also leases 
fifteen hundred acres in the same vicinity, and up 
to 1893 he was extensively engaged in the raising 
of cattle. Since that time he has turned his atten- 
tion to the growing of sheep, and in this line his 
operations are extensive. In politics he is a Re- 
publican and fraternally he is identified with the 
lodge and chapter bodies of the Masonic order, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Woodmen of the World. 

On the 25th of August, 1873, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Mason to Miss Emma Norton, 
who was born in Meadville, Crawford county, Pa., 
the daughter of John and Hannah Norton, both 
natives of New York state, the father of Cortland 
county and the mother of Wayne county, Mr. 
Norton was engaged in mercantile pursuits at 
Meadville, Pa., for years, and he was a Republican 
in politics. Both he and his wife were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. To them four 
children were bom, one dying in infancy, and Wil- 
bur F. passing away in 1890 at the age of forty- 
three years. The two surviving are Frank B. and 
Mrs. Mason. The death of John Norton occurred 
in 1854, and that of his wife in 1855. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mason were the parents of three children, 
of whom Frank and Archie are deceased, the only 
surviving child being Leon J., who was born on the 
28th of January, 1876, and now assists his father. 



pYRUS B. MENDENHALL.— We, of this 
v^ twentieth century, bristling with activity and 
electrical progress in all utilitarian lines, can not 
afford to hold in light esteem those who have lived 
to goodly ends in the days long past. Mr. Men- 



denhall's ancestral lines on either side show long 
and prominent identification with American history, 
while his own life has been one of honor and use- 
fulness. He is one of the representative farmers 
and stockgrowers of Park county, and has been 
closely identified with the pioneer history of the 
west. He was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, 
on July 28, 1830, the son of Thomas G. and Eliza- 
beth (Hollenback) Mendenhall, natives of Hagers- 
town, Md., and Wyloosing, Va., and who were 
parents of three sons and three daughters. His 
paternal grandfather was Samuel Mendenhall, who 
emigrated to America from England in the colonial 
epoch. The maternal grandfather was of pure 
Holland stock, many generations of the name having 
been identified with American history. His wife 
lived to the venerable age of 107 years. In 
his earlier life Thomas G. Mendenhall was a 
farmer, but later was long a zealous and de- 
voted clergyman, being a man of noble character 
and marked ability. He was one of the pioneer 
ministers of the M. E. church in Indiana for 
about fourteen years from the early 'thirties, after 
which the family home, until 1852, was in DeKalb 
county. 111., when they located in Marshall county, 
la., where the father died at eighty-four years, and 
his widow four years later, at eighty-six. Their 
lives were gentle and self-abnegating, and a bene- 
diction to all in their sphere of influence. 

Cyrus B. Mendenhall received his education in 
Indiana and Illinois. In 185 1 he removed to Mar- 
shall county, la., where he was joined by the 
family one year later. He was there engaged in 
farming and stockraising until 1866, when he 
started for Montana with ox teams, with which 
he transported a stock of merchandise. From Fort 
Laramie, on the Platte river, the train of fifty-two 
wagons and 170 men, Milton Lutz captain, came 
by the Bozeman cutoff to Rock creek, where the 
Indians stole six mules. No further trouble was 
encountered until nearing the Big Horn river, when 
they repelled an attack of Indians who had cap- 
tured ninety-six mules from one McBeers, who 
was just ahead of the train. After this they had 
almost daily encounters with the Indians, with no 
serious results until they reached Tongue river, 
where one of the party was killed. They arrived 
in A'irginia City, Mont., on August 4, 1866. After 
a month's stay he joined a party of 150 and 
came across to the Yellowstone river, which they 
followed to Sioux City, Iowa, and here he resumed 
farming on the Iowa homestead. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



[53 



In 1872 he again started for Montana, coming 
by rail to Corinne, Utah, and overland to Helena. 
He remained here about three months, returned to 
Iowa and thence removed with his family to Utah, 
and a few months later to Weld county, Colo., 
where Mr. Mendenhall engaged in the cattle busi- 
ness two years, and was buying, selling and ship- 
ping stock in Colorado until 1881, when he re- 
turned to Montana, and continued operations in the 
same line until 1887, when he sold out by reason 
of the severe losses he had met on account of the 
hard winters. In 1885 Mr. Mendenhall had pur- 
chased Hunter's hot springs, which he improved, 
there establishing a sanitarium and pleasure resort 
that attained great popularity under his manage- 
ment of thirteen years, when he disposed of the 
property and repurchased his former ranch of 
about 700 acres, near Springdale, Park county, and 
here he has made his home. He is improving the 
place for extensive sheepgrowing operations, in 
which his well-directed efforts can scarcely fail to 
bring success. In former years he has owned large 
herds of cattle, having at times 20,000 head under 
his control, conducting operations of wide scope 
and importance and showing executive ability and 
an inflexible integrity in his dealings. Politically 
he supports the Republican party, and fraternally 
is a Freemason. He is held in the highest esteem 
and, from his long and successful association with 
Hunter's springs, has a very wide circle of ac- 
quaintanceship. 

On May 19, 1859, Mr. Mendenhall wedded Miss 
Emeline Dean, a native of Ohio, who in 1879 was 
called to her final rest. She became the mother of 
seven children, Ida Elizabeth, wife of T. C. Ben- 
bow, of Absarokee, Carbon county; Hattie M., wife 
of Montie Blevins, of Colorado; Conway B. and 
James R., who are ranching in Carbon county; 
Alfred V., deceased; Charles P., a merchant at 
Springdale, Park county; and Inez B., wife of 
Ralph Jarrett, of Yellowstone county. Mr. Men- 
denhall consummated a second marriage on Sep- 
tember 18, 1 88 1, with Miss Susan A. Cooley, born 
in Auburn, Susquehanna county. Pa., daughter of 
R. W. Cooley, who later resided and died in Bing- 
hamton, N. Y. Mrs. Mendenhall's maternal grand- 
mother, in maidenhood Elmira Bostwick, was the 
first white child born in Bradford county. Pa., her 
birth occurring in 1796, anterior to the historical 
Wyoming massacre. Mrs. Mendenhall was edu- 
cated in Binghamton, N. Y., being a graduate of 
Miss Barton's seminary, and was engaged in teach- 



ing for several years, coming to Nebraska in 1876, 
and from thence to Montana. She is an active 
member of the Episcopal church, earnest in all 
good works. Like her husband, she enjoys a wide 
circle of friendship, and the home exemplifies true 
hospitality. They have many old documents and 
souvenirs of historic value and interest. Among 
them is a commission as captain given to Mr. Men- 
denhall's father by Gov. Trumbull, of Ohio, dated 
June 29, 1829, while another is a land grant signed 
by John Ouincy Adams. Mr. Mendenhall gives 
his support and influence to the Republican party, 
but has been ever averse to accepting official in- 
cumbency, though often requested to do so. He 
has, however, served a number of years as school 
trustee, an office hardly political. Mr. Mendenhall 
is well known and highly esteemed by the old 
settlers, acquiring their friendship by his honest 
course as a pioneer merchant. 



JOHN MATHESON.— The subject of this 
J sketch holds marked precedence as one of the 
sheepgrowers of Montana, and has been identified 
with the industry for several years Mr. Mathe- 
son is a native of the old Pine Tree state, where 
he was bom on August 20, 1837, the son of Dougal 
and Annie (Kennedy) Matheson, natives of bonnie 
Scotland and of pure Scotch ancestry. The father 
of our subject immigrated to the United States 
about the year 1822, settling in Maine, whence he 
later removed to Huron county, Ontario, Canada, 
where he purchased a farm and devoted his atten- 
tion to its cultivation until his retirement from the 
active duties of life, when he joined his son, the 
subject of this sketch, in Montana, where he made 
his home until his death, which occurred on Sep- 
tember 7, 1898, his wife having passed away many 
years previous. 

John Matheson grew up under the invigorating 
influences of the homestead farm in Ontario, re- 
ceiving such educational advantages as were af- 
forded by the common schools in the vicinity of his 
home. Upon attaining man's estate he went to 
Houghton county, Mich., and was employed as a 
miner in the Ouincy copper mines until 1867, when 
he returned to Huron county, purchased a farm and 
engaged in cattle growing and exporting, shipping 
cattle to England and Scotland. On December 16, 
1890, Mr. Matheson came to Montana and ef- 
fected the purchase of his present home ranch ot 



154 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



500 acres, located in the J\Iilk river valley, six miles 
east of Chinook, which is devoted to the raising of 
hay. When he first settled on the ranch he turned 
his attention to a system of irrigation, and at once 
set about the work of providing effective facilities 
in this line. Four times his ditches were destroyed, 
but his fifth attempt was crowned with success, and 
he succeeded in establishing a fine and thoroughly 
effective irrigating system ivhich covers a wide area 
of country in the valley. In addition to his home 
ranch Mr. Matheson owns 320 acres on Woody 
island creek ; another, of 160 acres, on Crow creek, 
and one of equal area on Fifteen Mile creek, all de- 
voted to the growing of sheep upon a very ex- 
tensive scale. Each ranch is well improved, all the 
incidental work having been accomplished under 
the immediate direction of Mr. Matheson. 

In politics Mr. Matheson gives allegiance to the 
Republican party. He has been a member of the 
Masonic fraternity for a period of thirty-three years, 
having passed the degrees of the capitular or Royal 
Arch body. His religious faith is that of the Pres- 
byterian church. His life has been one of absolute 
integrity and honor in all its relations, and it is 
needless to say that he retains the confidence and 
esteem of all who know him. On February 13, 
1865. was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Mathe- 
son to Miss Annie McDonald, daughter of John 
McDonald, who was born in Scotland, and of this 
union ten children have been born, namely : Hugh, 
William, deceased, John M.; Murdock, Roy, Mar- 
tha, wife of Arthur Benton, of Colorado, Jessie, 
wife of J. S. Roberts, of Milk river valley, Mary, 
wife of B. Bernard, of the state of Washington, 
Annie, wife of J. R. Malone, of Montana, and 
Donalda. 



/ ^ EORGE MAY, the prominent stockman, nier- 
V I chant and financier of Stevensville, whose word 
(jn 'change is accepted by everybody and whose 
progressiveness and resourcefulness in business is 
an inspiration in the community, is a native of 
Clinton, province of Ontario, Canada, where his 
life began September 14. 1858, and where he lived 
and attended the public schools until he was fifteen 
years of age. When he was sixteen he left home 
and entered upon an apprenticeship of three years 
at the trade of cabinetmaking, receiving $30 for 
his fir.st year's work. $40 for the second and $50 for 
the third. Of the gross sum he saved about $40 
witli which he bought tools wherewith to begin 



working at the trade for himself, which he followed 
until 188 1, and then came into the northwest of 
the United States, believing he could do better 
here than in the older portions of the country. He 
stopped for a few weeks in Colorado, then came 
to Montana, locating for a time in Judith basin, 
where he took up a claim and raised a big crop of 
hay, which was destroyed by a disastrous fire in 
the fall that swept over that whole section of coun- 
try, consuming everything before it. Mr. May 
herded sheep that winter, but not finding it very 
encouraging work he took a steamer at Rocky 
Point and went down the Missouri into Dakota, 
where he engaged in boring wells fox two years. 
At the end of that time he took up a claim in 
Dickey county and farmed for four years. In 1888 
he returned to Montana and worked at various 
occupations until he finally settled in the Bitter 
Root valley, near the town of Stevensville, which 
has since been his home. He has a large ranch and 
very extensive stock and mercantile interests in 
partnership with his brothers. Together they 
form the Bitter Root Live Stock Company, and 
as such own some 3,000 acres of land, 20,000 head 
of sheep, 500 head of cattle and other stock. They 
have also an extensive butchering business known 
as the May Brothers Butchering Company, which 
supplies a large scope of territory and many lines 
of profitable trade. In addition, as the Stevens- 
ville Mercantile Company, of which Mr. May is 
president, they conduct one of the largest, best and 
most complete department stores in the whole 
northwest. 

Mr. May has in his own right a fine ranch of 
150 acres, just outside of the city limits, whose ap- 
pearance and state of improvement is a tribute to 
his enterprise and taste. Of this he recently do- 
nated ten acres and gave $500 in cash to the 
Stevensville Training School, now in process of 
construction, and is working hard for its future 
success. He has always been deeply interested in 
educational, moral and civil aft'airs which tend to 
elevate and improve the community, and has given 
liberally of his time and substance for their ad- 
vancement. 

In politics he is an ardent Republican ; in re- 
ligious affiliation a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. Mr. May was married in December, 
1890, to Miss May L. Rairden, whose parents are 
residents of Dakota. The nuptials were solemnized 
at Park City, where Mrs. May was living at the 
time. They have two children, George R., aged 
seven, and Sarah A., aged six. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"55 



MARCO MEDIN.— It is fitting that memoir be 
here entered of this honored pioneer of the 
Pacific coast, for his hfe was one of signal useful- 
ness and honor, concerned with affairs of wide 
scope and importance and attended with a success 
worthy the name, though a number of his ventures 
were unfortunate. He made a record of which any 
man might well be proud, and his name is honored 
in the three states with whose history he was con- 
spicuously identified. Marco Medin was born in 
Budua, Dalmatia, Austria, on j\Iay 4, 1824, the 
son of Anton ]\Iedin, who was for many years a 
prominent merchant and influential citizen of 
Budua, of which he had the distinction of serving 
as mayor for sixteen years and where his death 
occurred. Marco was the eldest of five children, 
and his education was received in the excellent 
schools of Budua, and he was there identified with 
mercantile pursuits until 1850, when he emigrated 
to America, and by the Panama route made his way 
to California, attracted by the gold excitement. 

From that state, in 1861, he removed to Virginia 
City, Nev., where he engaged in merchandising, 
as he had been in California. He made extensive 
investments in mines, and, although successful in 
a number of ventures, he here lost fully $250,000. 
In September, 1884, he came to Montana, locating 
in Butte, where he was merchandising until his 
death on June 24, igoi. He devised his business to 
his sons and the residue of his estate to his cher- 
ished wife. Mr. Medin enjoyed the esteem of 
those who knew him and was acknowledged as 
one of the large-hearted business men of Mon- 
tana's metropolis. He was a stanch supporter of 
Democratic principles and policies. June 16, 1865, 
Mr. Medin was united in marriage with Miss Sarah 
Thornton, a native of Ireland, who survives him, 
as do their six children, who were born in Nevada, 
and of whom we enter brief record as follows : 
Antoinette is the wife of Marco Zarick, of Sacra- 
mento, Cal. ; INIarco J., a young business man of 
Butte; Sarah, wife of J. J. O'Meara, of Butte: 
]\lamie, wife of John G. Holland, of Butte: Annie 
(deceased), wife of W. A. O'Brien, of Butte, and 
Tony, who is in business in Butte. Mr. Medin, at 
his death, was the owner of a large amount of 
Nevada real estate and had valuable holdings in 
Great Falls. 

Marco Medin, Jr.. one of the progressive young 
men of Butte, is attending to the settlement and 
management of his father's estate. He supports 
the Democratic party, and was for two years rep- 



resentative of the Fourth ward in the city council, 
and in 1901 was the Democratic candidate for city 
treasurer, only being defeated by divisions in the 
party ranks, which made the contest an unequal one. 
He has been connected with merchandising and 
banking from the time of his entering the active 
duties of life, having been an executive in the 
VVells-Fargo bank in Virginia City, Nev., and 
being a bookkeeper in Butte for the Anaconda 
Company. He was president of the Finley-Medin 
Drug Company until the business was sold and 
still retains an interest in the business. 



PETER MATSON.— This industrious rancher 
is a native of Sweden, where he was bom on 
the 4th of February, 1856, the son of Swanson 
and Sarah Matson, both of whom were born in 
Sweden where his father, a shoemaker, still lives. 
He is a member of the Lutheran church, as was his 
wife, who died on the 17th of November, 1900. 
Of their six children, Charles and Ellen died, the 
others are Peter, Hannah, Elsie and Nels. 

At the age of twelve }ears, Peter Matson entered 
his father's shop to learn shoemaking. He became 
an expert workman and worked at this trade until 
he was twenty-six years old. In 1882 Mr. Matson 
emigrated to the United States and first located 
in Polk county, Minn., securing employment on 
the Manitoba Railroad where he worked two years, 
after which he was for six months employed in 
farm work. At the expiration of that period he 
then was appointed engineer in the electric light 
plant at Crookston, Minn., and held this position 
two and one-half years. He then came west to the 
Black Hills and was employed in mining, receiv- 
ing $4.00 per day. He remained at the Black 
Hills two and one-half years and returned east, 
going to Chicago and securing work in connection 
with the preparing of Jackson Park for I he great 
Columbian Exposition of 1893. Owing to the 
strike of the workmen Mr. Matson severed his 
connection and left Chicago for the west, making 
Montana his destination. He located in Great Falls, 
engaged in general labor for two }'ears, then was 
for a time engaged in a sawmill. \^isiting various 
parts of the state, he at last entered the employ of 
William Fergus, at Fort :\Iaginnis, for eight 
months. He then devoted his attention mainly to 
ranch work, and thus he continued work for various 
individuals until June, igoi, when he purchased 



iiS6 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



a ranch of 320 acres, located one mile south of 
Utica, in Fergus county. Thus far he has given 
his attention to raising hay, but will soon engage 
in cattleraising. He has a good property and is 
now established in an independent position. Mr. 
Matson supports the Republican party, and frater- 
nally is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

On the 22d of November, 1898, Mr. Matson wed- 
ded Miss Mary Olson, who was born in Sweden, 
the daughter of Magnus and Mary (Johnson) Ol- 
son, both long since dead. Both of her parents 
were members of the Lutheran church, as is also 
Mrs. Matson. Of their six children four are yet 
living, John P., Aubrom, Mary and Lena. Mr. and 
Mrs. Matson have two children, Josephine and 
Charlie. 



cellent business abilities, enjoys the confidence of 
a large circle of acquaintances, and holds a com- 
mission as postmaster of Eden postoffice. 



ROBERT VV. MEISENBACH, one of the pros- 
perous cattlemen of Cascade county, came 
to Montana in 1889. He was born at Waterloo, 
Monroe county, 111., the son of Edward and Caro- 
Hne Meisenbach, and he was born on July 15, 
1865, and much of the time of his boyhood being 
passed on his father's farm in Kansas, where he 
displayed great industry and enterprise while he 
diligently attended the public schools. In 1882 he 
began farming on his own account, taking full 
charge of seventy acres of land. Here he raised 
good crops and fine cattle, and although so young 
a man was quite prosperous. 

In 1888 he went to Walla Walla, Wash., where 
he worked three months on a farm, and then was 
iqv three months employed in a sawmill at Tacoma. 
He then returned east to East Grand Forks, Minn., 
where he was for another three months engaged 
in harvesting. He next joined his parents at Marys- 
ville, Kan., in the fall of 1888. The next spring 
he came to Great Falls, Mont., and at once took 
up a tree claim near Eden, while in May, 1898, he 
purchased 320 acres of improved land and in Sep- 
tember, 1900, his wife bought 120 acres, which 
gave them an estate of 640 acres. Four hundred 
acres of this land are under bountiful cultivation, 
and he also raises cattle. On December 29, 1896, 
Mr. Meisenbach married Miss Rosina Regina 
Morlock, daughter of Jacob and Rosina Regina 
Morlock, natives of Wurtemberg, Germany. The 
mother died in 1874 and the father in 1898. Of 
the three children of this worthy couple one died 
in infancy and the others are Edwin Arthur and 
Emma Rosina. Mr. Meisenbach is a man of ex- 



EDWARD MEISENBACH, a prosperous cat- 
tleman of Cascade county, first came to 
Montana in 1889. He was born in Prussia on 
November 27, 1836, the son of William and Anna 
(Christina) Meisenbach, natives of Prussia. The 
father was a farmer and a blacksmith. The mother 
died in Prussia in 1838, and within a year the father 
married Henrietta Stotzberg, of Prussia, and after 
ten years residence in Prussia in 1849 they emi- 
grated to the United States, locating at St. Louis, 
Mo. Here he engaged in blacksmithing until 1851, 
when he removed to Waterloo, Monroe county. 111., 
and engaged in farming, dying at the age of sixty- 
eight and his second wife at the age of fifty-eight. 

The son, Edward Meisenbach, came from Prus- 
sia in 1850 to Peru, 111., where his aunt, Regina 
Otto, who had come to America in 1850, was resid- 
ing. For one year he followed teaming in St. 
Louis, and in 1854 went to Waterloo, 111., where he 
engaged in farming until 1861. Mr. Meisenbach 
served fourteen months in the Civil war in Com- 
pany B, Third Missouri Infantry, and was honor- 
ably discharged. Passing the next winter at St. 
Louis, he returned to his farm. 

In 1864 Mr. Meisenbach wa. married to Miss 
Caroline Probst, born in Hanover, Germany, the 
daughter of Henry and Louisa (Kauffmann) 
Probst and had come with her parents from Ger- 
many. Her father died in 1849 a"d her mother in 
1847. Ill 1870 Mr. Meisenbach removed to Mar- 
shall county, Kan., and again followed successful 
farming for nineteen years. In 1889 he came to 
Great Falls, Mont., and going out on the bench and 
trying farming there without irrigation. He has 
demonstrated that this land is highly productive 
and was the pioneer of the thrifty German settle- 
ment of Eden. He has the finest residence of the 
community, and he and his estimable wife stand 
in a parental relation to the colony, being highly 
esteemed for their many useful characteristics. 
He took up tree and pre-emption claims, cultivat- 
ing 150 acres, and raising cattle. Subsequently he 
purchased eighty acres which he now utilizes for 
pasturage. In all he has 600 acres of land. The 
family has eight children : Robert W., Bertha, Julia 
A., Emma, Julius S., Lena, Daniel and Walter. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"57 



T AMES R. MENDENHALL.— One of the fine 
J ranch properties of Carbon county is that 
owned by the subject of this review, a represent- 
ative of one of the pioneer families of the state 
and recognized as one of the progressive and ca- 
pable young business men of Carbon county, be- 
ing the present postmaster of the thriving little 
village of Absarokee, receiving his appointment 
in the month of January, 1901. He is devoting 
his attention to farming and stockraising and 
such is his position in the community that he is 
well worthy of representation. James R. Men- 
denhall is a native of Iowa, having been born in 
Marshall county, January 11, 1866, the son of C. 
B. Mendenhall, a pioneer of that state, now an 
honored resident of Springdale, Sweet Grass coun- 
ty, Mont. He made the long and hazardous over- 
land trip to Montana, with a freighting outfit in 
the year 1865. While en route he encountered 
no little trouble with the Indians, one man in the 
party having been killed, while Mr. Mendenhall 
had all of his mules stolen. After his arrival in 
Montana he disposed of his stock of goods and 
provisions and returned to his home in Iowa. In 
the spring of 1866 he again started for the north- 
west, accompanied by his family. They made the 
overland journey to Utah and thence turned back 
and located at Greeley, Colo., where they remained 
about one year and then removed to Virgindale, 
where he was engaged in stockraising for some 
time. Thereafter the family resided for two years 
at North Park, Colo., and then came to Montana, 
making the overland trip and locating in Spring- 
dale, Sweet Grass county, where the father of our 
subject engaged in farming and stockraising and 
where he still maintains his home. Concerning him 
an individual sketch appears on another page of 
this work, and to this reference for data can be 
made concerning the genealogy and detailed in- 
formation in regard to the early career of this 
honored citizen of Montana. James R. Menden- 
hall received such educational advantages as were 
afforded in the somewhat primitive public schools 
in Colorado and Montana in the earlier days, and 
remained at the homestead ranch in Sweet Grass 
county until he had attained his legal majority, 
having had charge of his father's extensive cattle 
outfit for a number of years while the latter was 
operating the resort at Hunter's Hot Springs. 

After his twentieth year our subject engaged in 
freighting and was identified with other enter- 
prises, showing himself to be a self-reliant and ca- 



pable young business man, and thus continued 
until 1892, when a portion of the Crow Indian reser- 
vation was thrown open to settlement. He then lo- 
cated his present property, on the west bank of the 
Rosebud river, in what is now Carbon county, the 
place being near Stillwater river, hence the land is 
of exceptional fertility and value. Mr. Menden- 
hall has one of the finest locations in the county, 
and has recently completed arrangements for the 
opening of a town site on his property, whose ag- 
gregate area is 160 acres, all being available for 
cultivation. Here he is giving his attention to the 
raising of cattle of high grade, giving his prefer- 
ence to the shorthorn type, and is also securing 
excellent results from the cultivation of his ranch. 
He has recently erected a modern and attractive 
residence of two stories, making one of the best 
homes in this section of the county, his ranch be- 
ing contiguous to the little village of Absarokee, 
his postoffice address, and he is the postmaster. 
In politics Mr. Mendenhall gives support to 
the principles of the Republican party; fraternally 
he is identified with the Woodmen of the World. 
Through his energy and well-directed endeavors 
he has attained definite success and is -held in the 
highest confidence and esteem in his home com- 
munity, being a worthy type of the young men who 
have contributed in so large a measure to the legit- 
imate development and material advancement of 
the commonwealth. On July 5, 1888, Mr. Menden- 
hall was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Cos- 
griff, who was born in Iowa, the daughter of John 
Cosgriff, a successful farmer and stockgrov/er of 
Sweet Grass county, Mont., where he located a few 
years ago. At the time of his arrival in the state 
he was in greatly impaired health by reason of 
rheumatic troubles, but the fine climate has given 
him release and he is now in rugged health and 
very active, though he has attained the advanced 
age of seventy-five years. Mr. and Mrs. Menden- 
hall have three sons, Dean, Harry and Alfred. 



JB. MAXFIELD, of Boulder. Jefferson county, 
is the leading meat and provision dealer in that 
locality and has one of the finest and most perfectly 
equipped establishments in the west. It is in every 
way up-to-date and he practically supplies all Jef- 
ferson county with meat. Although he is a young 
man his success in this line, which has been the 
business of his life, is emphatic and pronounced. 



1 158 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



He was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on June 4, 
1862. His father, James A. Maxfield, is a native of 
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, and was 
born on January 14, 1837. He was a son of John 
Maxfield, of Yorkshire, England, who settled in 
Prince Edward Island early in the nineteenth cen- 
tury, taking up a large tract of land which he de- 
veloped into a productive farm. In 185 1 be re- 
moved with his family to Salt Lake City, and se- 
curing land in the beautiful Salt Lake valley, he 
continued farming until his death in 1872, adding 
lumbering also to that occupation. The family 
remained in the same place until 1901, then re- 
moved to Idaho. 

J. B. Maxfield thoroughly learned the butcher's 
trade in Salt Lake City and in 1882 came to Glen- 
dale, Beaver Head county, Mont., where he im- 
mediately secured employment at his trade, re- 
maining until 1885, when he accepted an offer from 
the Butte Butchering Company, with whom he 
remained two years. Thence he removed to Boul- 
der, and formed a partnership with William Wolter. 
In April, 1893, Mr. Wolter disposed of his in- 
terest to Alexander Gilliam and he and JMr. Alax- 
field continued together until Mr. Gilliam's death 
in 1897. Mr. Ma.xfield then bought his deceased 
partner's interest and has continued the business 
alone. He married Miss Amy Dunks, a daughter 
of IMonroe and Martha (Collins) Dunks. Her 
father came from Ohio in 1866 and settled near 
Boulder, where he engaged in stockraising. Mr. 
Maxfield is the eldest son of a family of four chil- 
dren : James Benjamin, William Appleton, Emma 
J. and Chauncey, the latter dying in infancy. In 
1897 his brother William came from Salt Lake 
City and has since assisted in the business. Mr. 
Maxfield joined the Odd Fellows in Salt Lake City 
in 1884, and has passed the chairs. He joined the 
United Workmen in 1894. Politically be is a Demo- 
crat and has ever been an earnest supporter of 
Ills party. 



ARTHUR W. MERRIFIELD.— Born in Erdley 
township, province of Quebec, July 22, 1855, 
the son of Stafiford and Almyra (Watts) Merrifield, 
also Canadians by nativity, and reared and edu- 
cated in his native land, Arthur W. Merrifield, of 
near Meadow, Flathead county, has passed most 
of his mature life in the United States and has con- 
tributed materially to the advancement and develop- 
ment of his adopted country. His father made his 



home in Ontario about 1855, and since that time 
has followed farming in that province. His wife 
died there in 1896. 

Their son Arthur received his scholastic education 
in the public schools of Burritt's Rapids, Ontario, 
and remained at home assisting in farm work until 
he was twenty-one years of age. In 1880 he re- 
moved to Fargo, Dak., and was engaged for a 
year in farming in that neighborhood. From there 
he went to the Bad Lands of Dakota, and locating 
on the Little Missouri river, was ranching and rais- 
ing stock until 1891. From 1881 to 1883 he was 
in partnership with S. M. Ferris, conducting two 
ranches, one, known as the Chimney butte, six 
miles south of Medora, and the other on the Elk- 
horn ranch. Little Missouri river, forty miles 
north of Medora. In September, 1883, Theodore 
Roosevelt, the present president of the United 
States, visited the Bad Lands and purchased a one- 
third interest in the business of Merrifield & Fer- 
ris. He was a member of the firm until the business 
was sold out in 1891, spending considerable time on 
the ranches throughout these years, and always per- 
forming his part of the work, whatever it might 
be. In his writings Mr. Roosevelt refers to Mr. 
Merrifield, who was the active manager of the busi- 
ness, as his "manager and close personal friend 
and associate." The business was extensive, the 
cattle herds numbering from 2,000 to 4,000 head, 
in addition to large numbers of horses. After dis- 
posing of his interests in that locality in 1891, Mr. 
Merrifield removed to Pleasant Valley, Flathead 
county, Mont., where he had previously secured 
a ranch of 2,000 acres at the headwaters of the 
Kootenai on Pleasant Valley creek and on the 
Great Northern Railway. In June, 1901, he formed 
the Pleasant Valley Land and Cattle Company, in- 
corporated, with J. H. Gordon as president; A. W. 
Merrifield, general manager ; and James Keith, sec- 
retary. Since then 1,000 acres have been added to 
the ranch which is now one of the finest in the state, 
with 1,000 acres of excellent meadow land in one 
body. The business of the company is raising 
cattle and horses on an extensive scale. 

In politics Mr. Merrifield is a Republican, and 
for years has taken an active interest in local and 
state aflfairs. He is a member of Kalispell Lodge 
No. 42, A. F. & A. M., and of the Royal Arch 
chapter and Knights Templar and the organization 
of the Eastern Star of the same place. He is also 
a life member of the Kalispell Lodge No. 725, B. 
P. O. E. He was married in 1878 to Miss Har- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"59 



riet Jameson, of Leeds, Ontario, who died there in 
1880. In 1887 he was united in marriage with 
Miss Miriam Purcell, of Erdley township, Quebec. 
He has one child, B. Frank Merrifield, a son of 
the first wife. 



LhARLES L. MERRILL.— Belonging to a 
vice to his country, both in military and in civil 
life, and himself a successful operator in various 
fields of commercial and mental activity, Charles 
L. Merrill is a typical progressive man of Mon- 
tana, with the traits of his ancestry fully exem- 
plified in his character and career. He was born 
at Burnett, Wis., April 25, 1859, a son of Lorenzo 
and Mary (Fisk) Merrill, natives of New Hamp- 
shire and belonging to old Colonial stock. Mr. 
Merrill's grandfather Fisk was a trusted and gal- 
lant soldier under Washington, and followed the 
great commander all through the Revolution. His 
father, Lorenzo Merrill, removed to Wisconsin, 
while it was yet a territory and was one of its pio- 
neers. He achieved distinction and influence in 
the state, being a member of its first legislature 
and successively returned to the body for a num- 
ber of terms. He was for eight years superintend- 
ent of the public schools in his county. He was a 
valued member of the State Pioneers' Association, 
and was held in high esteem everywhere for his pub- 
lic spirit and progressiveness, as well as for his 
sterling traits of character. In 1861 he was 
elected captain of a company of volunteers in Wis- 
consin enlisted for service in the Union army, 
but being over the legal age for the service was 
not accepted by the government. In consideration 
of his enhstment, however, and the desire of his 
fellow-citizens, he was appointed deputy United 
States marshal, a position in which he served 
throughout the war. He died in 1898, aged seven- 
ty-eight. 

His son, Charles L. ^lerrill, received his educa- 
tion in Burnett, Wis., after which he accepted a 
position in a bank at Depere, where he remained 
three years, and was there employed in the office 
of the division superintendent of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, remaining three 
years and receiving within that time several pro- 
motions. He then accepted an ofTer from the 
Denver & Rio Grande Railroad to work in its em- 
ploy at Salida, Colo., and later was agent for the 
company at Poncho Springs. He passed two 



years in this service, and in 1884 removed to Mon- 
tana, where he was appointed deputy county treas- 
urer of Custer county, served four years and was 
then elected treasurer. At the end of his term he 
engaged in the hardware business, also handled 
sheep with profit until the panic of 1893. Having 
always had a strong natural aptitude for and in- 
clination to the legal profession, and having de- 
voted his spare time to the study of law for two or 
three years, he concluded to enter the profession, 
and to that end took a course of instruction at the 
law department of the Nebraska State University, 
from which he was graduated in 1896. He then 
returned to Montana and began practicing at Miles 
City, where he was successful in winning many ex- 
tremely intricate and difficult cases, notably that of 
the State against Spotted Hawk, a Cheyenne In- 
dian, who was tried for the murder of Hoover, Mr. 
Merrill being associated with George W. Farr in 
defending the Indian. They took an appeal to the 
supreme court after their chent had been sentenced 
to be hanged, and, to the surprise of everybody, 
secured for him a new trial, which resulted in the 
dismissal of the case. This success won him great 
praise and general commendation as a young law- 
yer of unusual parts and promise, a reputation 
which his subsequent professional career has am- 
ply justified. He continued in practice at Miles 
City until 1898, when he removed to Bridger, 
where he has since been engaged in an expanding 
and profitable practice, and where he has been 
very successful in many important cases. He is lo- 
cal attorney for the Bridger Coal Company. 

On April 9, 1 881, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Matilda Hubbard, a native of Iowa. They 
have two children : Edward B. and Lorenzo B., 
both of whom are students at the State University 
at Seattle, Wash. Mr. Merrill belongs to the 
Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He is 
a progressive, wide-awake and representative man, 
with breadth of view, fine public spirit and excel- 
lent judgment concerning enterprises for the ad- 
vancement of the community, to all of which that 
he approves he gives substantial assistance. 



s 



TEPHEN H. MENDENHALL.— This impres- 
sive example of the hustling, up-to-date and 
enterprising ranchman, stockraiser and dairyman 
of JMontana, who occupies one of the most attract- 
ive and best developed ranches in that portion of 
Carbon county, was born in Marshall county, Iowa, 



ii6o 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



December 29, 1865, the son of James and Gerald- 
ine (Parsons) Mendenhall, the former a native 
of Ohio and the latter of Virginia. The family 
genealogy is recorded at length in the sketch of 
C. B. Mendenhall, of Park county, Mont., which 
appears elsewhere in this volume. 

Mr. Mendenhall's father removed from Ohio to 
Illinois and later to Iowa. He remained in the 
latter state until 1882, when he came to Montana 
and located in Meagher county, where he lived six- 
teen years, engaged in raising stock and rearing a 
family of eight children. Since 1898, when he 
sold out his interests there, he has been living with 
his son, who was educated in the schools of Iowa, 
and after coming to Montana remained with the 
family until 1886. He then engaged in the stock- 
business on his own account in that part of Meagher 
county which is now Fergus, and there operated 
extensively until 1899, having at times 500 head of 
stock. In 1899 he bought the Cowan ranch, one 
mile east of Bridger, on which he now lives and 
conducts an extensive dairy business, milking from 
twenty-five to forty cows. His place is well lo- 
cated for his business, and is improved with a 
fine modern residence, recently erected and 
equipped with every necessary appliance. It is un- 
der good fencing, is irrigated, and is in a high 
state of cultivation, producing excellent crops of 
alfalfa, and showing evidences of good manage- 
ment and skillful farming. Among the buildings 
which plentifully adorn it is a stone creamery of 
ample dimensions and furnished with the best 
modem machinery known to the business. 

At Crown Point, Ind., on February 5, 1902, Mr. 
Mendenhall led to the altar Miss Bertie May Lee, 
the ceremony occurring at the home of the bride. 

Mr. Mendenhall is a representative citizen of 
his section and is highly esteemed by all classes 
of people throughout the wide scope of territory 
in which he is known. 



JAMES M. MOORE.— The true western spirit 
of progress and enterprise is exemplified in the 
life of the subject of this review, and he has an 
honored place among the pioneers of Montana, 
whither he came as a mere boy and where he has 
attained a position of prominence as one of the 
reliable and successful farmers and stockgrowers 
of the beautiful Gallatin valley. He is essentially 
a self-made man, and his energetic nature and 



laudable ambition enabled him to conquer many 
adverse circumstances, while he has so ordered his 
life as to gain and hold the esteem and confidence 
of his fellow men. 

Mr. Moore is a native of Plattsburg, Clinton 
county, Mo., where he was born November tg, 
1847; his present home is known as Birch Glen, 
located in Gallatin valley, Mont. His father, John 
F. Moore, was born in Laurel county, Ky., Jan- 
uary 29, 1814, and is still living in Benton county. 
Ark. His wife, to whom he was married in Davis 
county. Mo., was Esther Chestnut, and of the same 
nativity as himself, was born in 181 7, and died in 
Clinton county, Mo., in 1853. The grandfather of 
our subject, Nathaniel Moore, was a native of 
Grant county, Ohio, and married Jane Ferris in 
Laurel county, Ky., where they both died. His 
great-grandfather, Moses Moore, was born near 
DubHn, Ireland, came to Ohio, and there died at 
the great age of 103 years. Prior to his departure 
from his native land he married Elizabeth Davis. 

Mr. Moore's mother, Esther Chestnut, was 
the daughter of Abraham and Esther (Evans) 
Chestnut, both born and reared in Laurel county, 
Ky., where they both died. His great-grandpar- 
ents, John and Lucy (Gratlif) Ferris, were English 
by nativity. The former was a captain in the 
Revolutionary war and was a slave-owner. 

Our subject's wife. Belle R. (Brown) Moore, 
was born near Warsaw, Iowa, September 16, 
1858. She is the daughter of Joseph Nelson and 
Jane (Sebastian) Brown, the former of whom was 
born at Vevay, Ind., November 17, 1816. He was 
a volunteer in the Blackhawk war, although but a 
boy of fifteen at the time it broke out, and for a 
number of years was leader of a celebrated church 
choir at Springfield, 111., was widely known as "the 
sweet singer of Springfield," and also sung in Har- 
rison's campaign. Mrs. Moore's grandfather, 
Amos Andros Brown, was born in Onondaga 
county, N. Y., in 1779, and died at Warsaw, Iowa, 
April 25, 1863. He was a prominent Mason, a 
member of the Royal Arch chapter and treasurer 
of the lodge at Corydon, Iowa, and in company 
with John Page, John Perry and others, organ- 
ized the first Masonic lodge ever held at Meta- 
mora. 111. He lived respected by all who knew 
him and warmly cherished by his close friends, 
among whom he had the pleasure to number 
Abraham Lincoln. At his death he left consider- 
able wealth. His wife was Ruth Nelson, of Ve- 
vay, Ind., to whom he was married in 1806. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF M0NTAKh4 



1161 



Mrs. Moore's great-grandfather, Asa Brown, 
was born in London, England, in 1754. His wife 
was Sarah Andros, whom he married in England, 
was a relative of the first governor of New York. 
The mother of our subject's wife, Jane (Sebastian) 
Brown, was born at Vevay, Ind., February 19, 
1822, and was married there October 23, 1847, and 
her golden wedding was celebrated in Oregon 
City, Ore., October 23, 1897. Her father, Alex- 
ander Sebastian, was born in Garrard county, Ky., 
January 31, 1795, and died in Madison county, Ky., 
April 13, 1857. He was probate judge of his na- 
tive county for eight years ; was a missionary Bap- 
tist minister, and was widely known as an eloquent 
orator. At the age of seventeen he joined Gen. 
William Henry Harrison's army, and fought at the 
battle of "Dudley's Defeat," where he and George 
Clarke were captured by Tecumseh's warriors. 
They were compelled to run the gauntlet, in doing 
which Clarke was struck down and killed, but 
Sebastian escaped unscathed. He afterward 
married George Clarke's sister. He was an 
elector for William Henry Harrison when he was 
elected president. At the reunion of the sol- 
diers of 1812, held at Lawrenceburg, Ind., there 
was a Sebastian present to represent him. Jane 
Sebastian's grandparents, William and Sarah 
(Ware) Sebastian, were born near Halifax, N. C, 
the former in 1767 and the latter in 1769. He was 
killed by the Indians and she died in Kentucky. 
She became familiar with life among savages. 
When she was eleven years old the British troops 
were in the neighborhood of her father's home, 
foraging, and she remembered seeing him hide 
the family supply of meat in the chimney to keep 
them from taking it. The Sebastians were of 
Spanish and Italian ancestry, who located in 
Wales about 1550, and immigrated to America, 
settling in North Carolina in the early Colonial 
days, and were slave-owners. One of their de- 
scendants, Sebastian Brown, was a prominent law- 
yer in Baltimore, Md., and recently died there full 
of years and enjoying the respect and esteem of 
everybody. He was a relative of Mrs. Moore. 
Mrs. Moore's maternal grandmother, Nancy 
(Clarke) Sebastian, was born in Garrard county, 
Ky., October 20, 1790, and died September 10, 
1842. Her father, John Clarke, was a native of 
Virginia, where he was born in 1763, and died in 
Kentucky in 1840. His wife, Ludicia (McMillen) 
Clarke, was born in Rhode Island in 1761 and died 
in 1826. The McMillens came from Scotland, the 



Clarkes from England, and both families were 
slave-owners. Ruth Nelson, Joseph Nelson 
Brown's mother, who died in Wayne county, Iowa, 
in May, 1865, was a native of Maryland, and was 
born near Snow Hill in 1782, whither her father, 
Joseph Nelson came from England. He plotted 
owned and named the city of Snow Hill, and died 
seized and possessed of it, as he never sold it. It 
is thought his heirs would have a good claim to 
the land on which it stands. His wife was Sarah 
(Parsons) Nelson. His father was born near 
London, England, and a member of the family, by 
direct descent, of Admiral Nelson, the hero of 
Trafalgar. Sarah (Parsons) Nelson came from 
Dublin, Ireland, where she was born in 1742. She 
died in 1825. Her father, Charles Parsons, was 
bom near Dublin and her mother, Rebecca 
(Keith) Parsons, in Scotland. Two of Mrs. 
Moore's grand-uncles, Samuel and Nathan Nel- 
son, brothers of her maternal grandmothers, Ruth 
Nelson, fought in the war of 1812 under Gen. Will- 
iam Henry Harrison. 

James M. Moore, the immediate subject of this 
review, was reared on the parental farm, and early 
became inured to the labors pertaining thereto, 
laboring earnestly even as a child in the farm work. 
His early educational advantages were extremely 
limited in scope, being only such as were obtain- 
able in the primitive district school in the vicinity 
of the homestead farm in Missouri. Through per- 
sonal application and reading in later years, and 
through his practical association with men and af- 
fairs, he has, however, built a superstructure of 
knowledge which effectively supplements the rudi- 
mentary foundation laid in boyhood days. In the 
spring of 1864 Mr. Moore left home and started 
for the far west, coming in company with Maj. 
Forbis and his party. They set forth 01 the long 
journey across the plains in the month of May, 
and in September arrived at their destination, 
Alder gulch, the site of the present Virginia City, 
Mont. Mr. Moore remained but a short time in 
that famous mining camp, whence he made his way 
to Gallatin valley, where he remained until the fol- 
lowing spring, and then removed to the North 
Boulder country and finally to Helena, where for 
two years he was employed by Maj. Forbis in the 
construction of buildings. He then returned to 
the valley of the North Boulder river and there 
took up a claim of land, on which he was engaged 
in ranching until the spring of 1870, when he came 
again to Gallatin valley and located on a ranch not 



tl62 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



far distant from his present fine farm. In 1872 he 
purchased his present fine homestead located 
four miles and a half northeast of Belgrade. 
When he took the place a few improvements 
had been made, and the first home was a 
little log cabin, 16x24 feet in' dimensions. He 
has made permanent improvements of the best 
character, including a commodious and sub- 
stantial residence of pleasing architectural de- 
sign, and he has brought the entire place to 
a very high state of cultivation. It is devoted 
to general farming and the raising of livestock, 
though the latter branch of his ranching enterprise 
is subordinate to the agricultural phase. Mr. 
Moore has attained marked success m his efforts 
since locating in this section of the state, and has 
achieved the same entirely through his own indus- 
try and determined application, having started 
with practically nothing in the way of financial re- 
inforcement, and by hard labor earned every dol- 
lar represented in his fine homestead and all other 
forms of property that he owns. He is a man of 
the highest honor and integrity in all the relations 
of life, and commands the confidence and esteem 
of the entire community, where the family enjoy a 
distinctive popularity. He is progressive in his 
methods, is public-spirited in his attitude, and is 
known as a man of wide information and sound 
judgment. In politics he gives his support to the 
Democratic party and its principles, though he has 
never sought pubHc office. He is a member of 
the Knights of the Maccabees. In 1878, while Mr. 
Moore was making a visit in Iowa, he was mar- 
ried to Miss Belle Rosalthe Brown, a native of 
Wayne county, the ceremony being performed on 
March 5, 1878. Of this happy union three chil- 
dren have been born, namely: Ellie James Sebas- 
tian, born January 7, 1879, graduated in 1901 from 
the Montana State College, and entered Yale 
University September 26, of that year; Gertrude 
M. C, born December 11, 1881, and Icie E. B., 
born May 31, 1883; the two last-named are stu- 
dents at Bozeman College. Mrs. Moore's old 
home was near Warsaw, Iowa, and was known as 
"Maple Grove." Her parents now reside at Ore- 
gon City, Ore. Mr. and Mrs. Moore are mem- 
bers of the Baptist church, belonging to the con- 
gregation of Gallatin valley church, to the erection 
of which Mr. Moore made liberal contributions 
and in which Mrs. Moore was the first person to 
be baptized and in this connection they are highly 
valued. 



EUGENE MEYER, the proprietor of the Hot 
Springs Hotel, Alhambra, Jefferson county, 
is one of the pioneers of Montana who participated 
in some of the most stirring events of the old days. 
He was born in Strasburg, Germany, in 1854. 
Michael Meyer, his father, was a native of Stras- 
burg, who, in 1858, emigrated with two children to 
the United States and located in Brown county, 
111., where he engaged in- lumbering and conduct- 
ing a sawmill. 

Eugene Meyer received his education in Quincy, 
111. Following his graduation from the high 
school he entered the drug business as an appren- 
tice, and continuing this occupation for five years 
he thoroughly mastered pharmacy. In the spring 
of 1874 he came to Montana and the first employ- 
ment he secured was at the Broadwater Hot 
Springs, near Helena, and after a year's service he 
purchased the property, remained at its head suc- 
cessfully for four years, then disposed of it and re- 
moved to Helena. Here he engaged in the min- 
eral water business for three years, and was its 
pioneer in Montana. After retiring from this he 
returned to the Broadwater Hot Springs and was 
burned out eighteen months later. He then re- 
moved to Helena and became a manufacturing 
druggist, in which he continued ten years. He 
has but recently removed to Alhambra, where he is 
proprietor of the hotel at Hot Springs. The polit- 
ical affiliations of Mr. Meyer are with the Republi- 
can party, in whose welfare he has ever taken a 
patriotic interest. He is a member of the United 
Workmen and is past chancellor of the Knights of 
Pythias. On February 13, 1878, he was united in 
marriage to Miss Emma Kirshner, a native of 
Germany. Their children are twins, Charles E. 
and Cora E. Mr. Meyer's life has been one of 
activity and enterprise. He is a progressive man, 
of broad views and strict probity of character. 
Throughout the state he numbers a large circle of 
warm personal friends. 

One of the most exciting events in the career 
of Mr. Meyer was the part he took in the Nez 
Perces war. For some time there had been rum- 
blings of discontent in that tribe, with occasional 
hostile demonstrations. In August, 1877, the 
news of a general uprising of the Indians was 
flashed over the state. Outrages had been com- 
mitted by various predatory bands. The excur- 
sion party of George F. Cowan, a leading lawyer 
of Boulder, had been assaulted in the Yellowstone 
Park, and Mr. Cowan shot three times by hostile 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 163 



Nez Perces. (See Mr. Cowan's sketch elsewhere 
in this work.) Like the old minute men of the 
Revolution, swift riders were flying over the coun- 
tr)', warning settlers of the impending danger. 
The United States troops did not appear able to 
cope with the savages. Able generals were in the 
field, but there was an admitted scarcity of pri- 
vates, and Gov. Potts issued an urgent call for 
volunteers, that met with a ready response. 
Many prominent citizens who have since won dis- 
tinction in state and national affairs became lead- 
ers. Companies were rapidly organized at Hele- 
na, at Butte, in Jefiferson county, all over northern 
Montana. Business was suspended and brave 
men hastened to the protection of homes and fami- 
lies. Among the earliest to volunteer was Eugene 
Meyer. He became a member of the light artil- 
lery company commanded by Capt. Curtis, of 
Helena. For nearly two months the war con- 
tinued, accompanied by all the horrid details of 
Indian savagery. Mr. Meyer's company was 
scouting, watching the movements of the Indians 
and warning the people of approaching danger. 
For six weeks Mr. Meyer and his brave com- 
panions trailed the Indiani from tlie National 
Park to the Missouri valley, and thence to Judith 
basin. Here they fought the last, the fiercest and 
the decisive battle of that memorable war, and as 
a result Chief Joseph, Lookingglass, some lesser 
chiefs and 350 Nez Perces braves surrendered to 
Gen. Miles. Gen. Gibbon notified Gov. Potts of 
the surrender on October 8, three days after the 
battle was fought, but, in the summer of 1878, the 
savages who escaped from this decisive action, re- 
turned via Cardotte pass, killed a settler at Bear 
gulch, escaped pursuit and safely reached the camp 
of their tribe in Idaho. During this war Mr. 
Meyer was thrown from his horse and received a 
serious injury in the knee from which he still suf- 
fers. ' Subsequently the members of the volunteer 
company received from the United States govern- 
ment an honorable mention and a small financial 
recompense. 



FREDERICK W. MEYERSICK.— Mr. Meyer- 
sick has been a resident of America from child- 
hood and came to Montana nearly thirty-five years 
ago and is now a successful rancher of Fergus 
county, having achieved prosperity through his 
own assiduous efforts and determined purpose. 
Mr. Meyersick was born in the province of 



Hanover, Germany, in 1838, a son of Joab and Clara 
Meyersick, who emigrated from the Fatherland 
to the United States in 1844, locating in St. Charles 
county. Mo., where both he and his wife died within 
a year after their arrival in this country, leaving 
Frederick an orphan at the age of six years. Joab 
Meyersick and his wife were members of the Lu- 
theran church and folk of sterling character. They 
had eight children, only two are now living. 

Frederick W. Meyersick, after the death of his 
parents, went to live with his sister, Mrs. ]Mary 
E. Eggerson, in St. Charles county, Mo., attended 
the public schools and for a time the college at 
St. Charles, Mo. Early in Ufe he became identified 
with farming in Missouri, and continued to be 
identified with this line of enterprise until 1863, 
after which he passed an interval in various occupa- 
tions but eventually resumed farming in St. Charles 
county, where he remained until 1866, when his 
health became impaired and he removed to 
Rock Island, 111., remained about a year, and re- 
turned to St. Louis in March, 1867, and there 
boarded one of the Missouri river steamboats for 
Montana, arriving in Fort Benton in due course of 
time. He first located on the Missouri river in 
Meagher county, where he found employment on 
a ranch, receiving $50 per month. Later he was 
engaged in getting out timber and in burning char- 
coal, and during the winters of 1867 and 1868 he 
found employment in cutting drift timbers at $75 
a month. Mr. Meyersick next purchased a freight- 
ing outfit and conducted operations in freighting 
between Diamond City and the Missouri river from 
the spring of 1868 until the fall of 1869, when he 
went to White Pine, Nev., where he was employed 
as a brakeman on wagons used in transporting ore 
down the mountains, returning to Montana in July, 
1869. He was then ranch hand in the Missouri 
valley until the fall of 1870, and in the following 
spring he purchased a ranch upon which the vil- 
lage of Canton now stands. He there devoted his 
attention to farming and cattle raising until 1883, 
when he sold out and moved to his present ranch, 
two miles south of Cottonwood, Fergus county, 
and which comprises 154 acres of exceptionally 
arable land, yielding fine crops. Mr. Meyersick 
also gives attention to cattleraising, in which he 
has been successful. In politics he is a Democrat, 
and his religious faith is that of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which his cherished and de- 
voted wife was likewise a member. 

On the 5th of December, 1871, Mr. Meyersiclc 



1 64 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTAX.K 



was united in marriage to Miss Alice Steele, who 
was born in Cooper county, Mo., the daughter of 
Ewing and Anna E. Steele, natives respectively of 
Missouri and Kentucky and both members of the 
Methodist church. Mrs. Steele's death occurred in 
1897 and that of her husband in April, 1901. Mr. 
Steele was a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. To Mr. and Mrs. Meyersick twelve 
children were born, two of whom died in infancy, 
and William R., who was killed while serving as a 
soldier in the Philippines, February 13, 1899. The 
surviving children are Edgar, Albert, Charles and 
Frank (twins), Annie, Ada, Eva and Verney. Mrs. 
Meyersick died on the 27th of June, 1888, deeply 
mourned by her large circles of friends. 



N^ 



ELSON APPLETON MILES, soldier, was 
born at Westminster, Mass., August 8, 1839, 
son of Daniel and Mary (Curtis) Miles. His 
earliest American ancestor was Rev. John Miles, 
a Baptist minister and educator, who emigrated 
from Wales in 1662 and settled at Swansea, Mass.; 
he served in King Philip's war. Nelson A. Miles 
was reared on his father's farm, and received a 
district school and academic education. In 1856 
he went to Boston, where his uncles, George and 
Nelson Curtis, obtained a position for him in 
the crockery store of John Collamore. Having 
attended a military school in Boston, conducted 
by N. Salignac, a French colonel, at the outbreak 
of the Civil war he raised a company of volunteers 
and offered his services to his country. In Sep- 
tember, 1861, he was appointed a captain in the 
Twenty-Second Massachusetts Volunteers, but 
was considered too j'oung for the responsibility 
of that command, which he was required to re- 
sign and to accept a Heutenant's commission. On 
May 31, 1862, he was commissioned by Gov. 
Morgan lieutenant-colonel of the Sixty-first New 
York Volunteers. He was promoted colonel Sep- 
tember 30, 1862; was made a brigadier-general May 
12, 1864, and major-general October 21, 1865. He 
received the appointment of colonel of the Fortieth 
United States Infantry March 15, 1866; was trans- 
ferred to the Fifth Infantry March 15, 1869; pro- 
moted brigadier-general United States army De- 
cember 15, 1880, and major-general April 5, 1890. 
He saw severe active fighting during the seven 
days fighting on the peninsula of the James river 
and before Richmond in the summer of 1862, and 



was severely wounded at Fair Oaks ; and on the 
change of base to Harrison's Landing Gen. Miles 
acted as adjutant-general to the First Brigade, 
First Division, Second Army Corps. At Freder- 
icksburg he led his regiment, the Sixty-first New 
York Volunteers. In the battle of Chancellors- 
ville he was so severely wounded that he was not 
expected to recover, and was breveted brigadier- 
general "for gallant and meritorious services in 
the battle of Chancellorsville" ; and August 25, 
1864, was breveted major-general "for highly 
meritorious and distinguished conduct through- 
out the campaign, and particularly for gallantry 
and valuable services in the battle of Ream's 
Station, Va." He fought in all the battles of the 
Army of the Potomac, with one exception, up to 
the surrender of Lee at Appomattox court house, 
Va. He was breveted brigadier-general and major- 
general, United States Army, both dating March 
2, 1867, the latter for "gallant and meritorious 
services in the battle of Spottsylvania." After the 
close of the war. Gen. Miles, in command of his 
regiment, was employed in Indian service, and 
defeated the Cheyenne and Comanche Indians on 
the borders of the Staked Plains in 1875, and in 
1876 broke up the hostile Sioux and other tribes 
in Montana. His successes in warfare on the 
plains were so great and so continuous that Gen. 
Miles became known as the "Indian fighter." He 
drove the celebrated chief Sitting Bull across the 
Canadian frontier, and dispersed extensive bands 
led by Crazy Horse, Lame Deer, Spotted Eagle, 
Broad Tail and other chiefs well known in the 
far west. This was in the years 1876-77, the In- 
dian outbreak becoming general, the cause being 
the disaffection of the Dakota Sioux, of which 
Sitting Bull was the principal chief. It was in 
June, 1876, that Gen. Custer's party was defeated 
and massacred on Little Big Horn river, an event 
which was followed by the prompt and decisive 
campaigns of Gen. Miles. In September, 1877, 
another outbreak, this time on the part of the 
Nez Perces Indians under Chief Joseph, was met 
by Miles and speedily overcome, and in 1878 he 
captured a party of Bannacks near Yellowstone 
Park. But perhaps his most difficult campaign 
was that against the fierce chief Geronimo of the 
hostile Apaches, doubtless the most bloodthirsty 
and cruel tribe of Indians in the whole of North 
America. After innumerable depredations and 
raids on the part of the Indians, Gen. Sheridan, 
commander-in-chief, determined to have Geron- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1165 



itno suppressed at any cost. An expedition under 
Gen. George Crook was fitted out early in 1886, 
but, as it was unsuccessful, Gen. Crook asked to 
be relieved, and Gen. Miles was ordered to take 
his place. The result was that, after one of the 
longest and most exhausting campaigns known 
in Indian warfare, the Apache was forced to yield. 
Miles and his troopers gave them not an hour of 
rest, but followed on their trail, forcing them 
to keep moving until even their dogged endur- 
ance could bear it no longer. The whole band 
was captured, and Geronimo and his principal 
followers were sent to Fort Pickens, Fla., in the 
latter part of 1886. Following these brilliant suc- 
cesses, Gen. Miles received the thanks of the 
legislatures of Kansas, Montana, New Mexico 
and Arizona for his valuable services, and on No- 
vember 8, 1887, the citizens of Arizona presented 
him at Tucson with a sword of honor in the 
presence of a large gathering of citizens. In 1890- 
91 Gen. Miles suppressed a fresh outbreak of 
Sioux and Cheyennes. In 1894, under orders 
from President Cleveland, he commanded the 
United States troops sent to Chicago to suppress 
the serious rioting and threatened rebellion which 
occurred there. This difficult duty he accom- 
plished with the celerity and completeness which 
have always characterized his obedience to the 
orders of his superior officers. Gen. Miles was in 
command of the Department of the Columbia from 
1880-85 ; July. 1885, to April, 1886, commanded the 
Department of the Missouri; April, 1886, was as- 
signed to the command of the Department 
of Arizona, and in 1888 was given com- 
mand of the _ Division of the Pacific. In 
1897 Gen. Miles represented the United States 
at the jubilee ceremonies in London of Queen 
Victoria, and also visited the seat of war between 
Turkey and Greece. On his return he published 
a volume on "Military Europe," having previously 
given to the public a volume of "Personal Recol- 
lections" (1897). On the retirement of Gen. Scho- 
field, in 1895, Gen. Miles became commanding 
general of the United States army, with head- 
quarters at Washington, D. C. He was in general 
command of all the troops in the movements and 
operations against the enemy during the Spanish- 
American war and in the succeeding war against 
the Philippine insurgents. He appeared with re- 
inforcements before Santiago fell, and was in 
charge of the negotiations and terms of surrender 
of the Spanish army under Gen. Jose Toral. On 



February 2, 1901, he became, by selection and 
promotion, under the army reorganization act, the 
lieutenant-general commanding the Army of the 
United States. On April 9, 1898, war with Spain 
was imminent, he recommended the equipment 
of 50,000 volunteers, and on April 15th recom- 
mended that an additional force of 40,000 be pro- 
vided for the protection of coasts and as a re- 
serve. In a letter to the secretary of war, April 
1 8th, he asserted his beHef that the surrender of 
the Spanish army in Cuba could be secured "with- 
out any great sacrifice of Hfe," but deprecated the 
sending of troops thither in the sickly season to 
cope with an acclimated army. War having been 
officially announced, he (April 26th) addressed 
another letter to Sec. Alger, declaring that the 
volunteer troops called into service ought to be 
in camp in their respective states for sixty days 
approximately, in order to be thoroughly equipped, 
drilled and organized. As soon as definite infor- 
mation came that Cervera's fleet was inclosed in 
the harbor of Santiago, Gen. Shaffer was ordered 
to place his troops on transports and go to the 
assistance of the navy in capturing the fleet and 
harbor. Gen. Miles, then at Tampa, expressed 
to the secretary of war his desire to go with this 
army corps, or to immediately organize another 
and go with it to join this and capture position 
No. 2 (Porto Rico). The next day he was asked 
by telegram how soon he could have an expedi- 
tionary force ready to go to Porto Rico large 
enough to take and hold the island without the 
force under Gen. Shaffer, and replied that such 
an expedition could be ready in ten days. On 
June 24th he submitted a plan of campaign for 
Cuba; on the 26th was ordered to organize an 
expedition against the enemy in Cuba and Porto 
Rico, to be composed of the united forces of 
Gens. Brooke and Shaffer, and to command 
it in person. He was not sent to Cuba, however, 
until two weeks later, arriving opposite Santiago 
with reinforcements for Shaffer on July nth, at 
the time Sampson's fleet was bombarding the 
Spanish position. Conferences with Sampson and 
Shafter were then had and arrangements made to 
disembark the troops, and on the 13th Gen. Miles, 
with Gens. Gilmore, Shafter, Wheeler and others 
held a conference between the lines with Gen. 
Toral. The Spanish commander was informed 
that he must surrender or take the consequences, 
and on the same day the secretary of war tele- 
graphed Gen. Miles "to accept surrender, order 



ii66 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



an assault or withhold the same," in his discretion, 
etc. On the morning of July 14th Admiral Samp- 
son's fleet was prepared to cover the landing at 
Cabanas of Gen. Henr)''s command on the Yale, 
Columbia and Duchess, but Gen. Toral surren- 
dered his forces to Gen. Miles that day, and ag- 
gressive action was unnecessary. Gen. Miles 
authorized Gen. Shafter to appoint commissioners 
to draw up articles of capitulation, and instructed 
him to isolate the troops recently arrived on 
healthful grounds to keep them free from infec- 
tion by yellow fever. On the same day Sec. Alger 
advised Gen. Miles to return to Washington as 
soon as matters at Santiago were settled, and 
go to Porto Rico with an expedition that was being 
fitted out ; but after some delay Miles obtained per- 
mission to proceed from Cuba to Porto Rico. On 
July 2 1 St he sailed from Guantanamo with an 
effective force of only 3,314 men, whereas the 
Spanish regulars and volunteers in Porto Rico 
aggregated 17,000. The objective point was Cape 
San Juan ; but it was finally decided to go direct 
to Guanica, near Ponce, on the southern coast; 
and there, on the 25th, a detachment of troops 
was landed. Ponce surrendered to Gen. Miles 
without resistance on the 27th, and the troops 
were received with enthusiasm by the citizens. 
A proclamation by Gen. Miles, issued on the fol- 
lowing day, assured the inhabitants of Porto Rico 
that the American forces came not to devastate 
or oppress, but to give them freedom from Span- 
ish rule and the blessings of the liberal institu- 
tions of the United States government. Town 
after town was occupied, the army proceeding 
northward, Gen. Brooke with his command ar- 
riving on August 3d to aid in occupying the 
island. On the 25th Gen. Miles was instructed to 
send home all troops not actually needed, and soon 
after he returned to Washington. Gen. Miles 
was married, in 1868, to Mary, daughter of Judge 
Sherman, of Ohio. They have one son and one 
'laughter. 



I AMES H. MOE.— Tliis gentleman, whose death 
J occurred in 1895, at the early age of forty-nine, 
accomplished within a limited compass of time a 
business record which would be creditable to anv 
man even if it were the product of a long life of 
earnest effort. He was born in Oswego, N. Y., in 
T846, and attained maturity in his native state. In 
1867 he came to Nebraska and was for five vears in 



railroad business. In 1875 he took up his resi- 
dence in Helena, as register of the United States 
land office, a position which he filled for several 
years. He then removed to White Sulphur Springs 
and as a member of the firm of Potter, Moe & 
Co., opened there a private bank. This enterprise 
later merged in the First National Bank, of White 
Sulphur Springs, of which Mr. Moe was the 
founder and cashier. 

From White Sulphur Springs Mr. Moe removed 
to Lewistown, and here he was the principal factor 
in the successful operation of the Fergus County 
Bank, aided in ptitting it on a high plane of financial 
activity and prosperity, and drawing to its counters 
a large and loyal body of patrons. In addition to 
this interest he was connected with sheepraising 
and other profitable enterprises. He was an active 
Republican, taking interest in the success of 
his party and to its policies and candidates giving 
earnest, hearty and helpful service. Fraternally he 
was prominently identified with the Masonic order, 
filled many of its important offices and had at- 
tained to the thirty-third degree. He was also al- 
lied with the Knights of Pythias and the Odd Fel- 
lows. Mr. Moe was at the front of every good 
enterprise for the benefit of the community. His 
bank was the first bank of Fergus county, and was 
made one of the strongest of its rank and capacity 
in the state. He was a wide-awake, energetic and 
progressive citizen, whose death was keenly felt. 



PETER MICHELS.— One of the influential 
and progressive men of Sweet Grass county, 
Mont., is Peter Michels. a German-American 
who has won the confidence and esteem of all the 
residents of the Boulder river district. He was 
born in Fond du Lac county. Wis., on Septem- 
ber 28, 1 861, the son of Peter J. and Katherine 
(Nickoli) Michels, both Germans, and he is one 
of a family of four sons and three daughters. 
His father, accompanied by his father, immigrated 
to the United States in 1840, settling in Wis- 
consin, where he took up government land and 
engaged in farming until his death in 1889. Until 
1878 Peter Michels remained on the homestead 
and attended the Wisconsin schools. He then 
went to the Lake Superior iron regions in com- 
pany with a brother, where for two years they 
were employed in the mines, securing lucrative 
contracts for the delivery nf ore. In the spring 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



167 



of 1881 the brothers removed to JMontana and 
worked in the amalgamator at the Drum Lum- 
mon mine at Marysville. This employment Mr. 
Michels discontinued in 1889, although his brother 
John still continues as foreman of the mill. 

Peter Michels then came to Boulder river, pur- 
chased the claim of James Reid and engaged in 
cattleraising, which he later changed to sheep- 
growing. In 1895 he made another change, dis- 
posing of his sheep and engaging almost exclus- 
ively in cattleraising, Herefords being his prin- 
cipal variety, and wintering about 100 head. His 
ranch comprises 300 acres, mostly under irriga- 
tion, being supplied with two ditches, one car- 
rying 1,000 inches of water and the other 800. 
In 1889, after his father's death, Mr. Michels re- 
turned to Wisconsin, and, settling up the es- 
tate, the other members of the family, two sisters 
and two brothers, accompanied him to Montana. 
One sister, Mrs. AlcComb, lives on Boulder river 
and the other. Mrs. Smidelkofer, is the wife of 
a prominent rancher. The two brothers, Joseph 
and Matthew, have also fine ranching properties 
in the same neighborhood. On February 26, 
1889, Mr. Michels was married to Miss Emma 
Hensgen, of Wisconsin, daughter of Anton Hens- 
gen, a native of Germany, now living in Fond 
du Lac county, Wis. Their children are Amelia 
and Ida. The political affiliations of Mr. Michels 
are with the Democratic party, and in 1900 he was 
its choice for commissioner of Sweet Grass 
county. He is recognized as one of the pro- 
gressive citizens of the district and is highly re- 
spected. 



HENRY MONFORTON.— Man's usefulness in 
the world is judged by the good he has done ; 
and, determined by this standard of measurement, 
Henry Monforton occupies a position of distinction 
among the citizens of Gallatin county. His life has 
been noble and upright, over which falls no shadow 
of wrong, and long after he shall have passed away 
his memory will remain as a benediction to those 
who knew him. He is distinctively one of the 
pioneers of Montana and has witnessed and been 
identified with the various stages of her develop- 
ment from the wild frontier to a dignified and 
prosperous commlon wealth. Mr. Monforton comes 
of fine old French lineage on both sides of the 
family, his paternal grandfather having been an ac- 
tive participant in the French and English war, in 



which he was taken prisoner by the British and 
sent to Canada, and through that circumstance the 
Monforton family became established on American 
soil. Henry Monforton, of Bozeman, a retired ag- 
riculturalist and stockgrower of Gallatin county, 
was born in upper Canada, on March 22, 1829, the 
son of William and Catherine (Cabana) Monforton, 
who lived and died in Canada, where they were 
born. The father attained the venerable age of 
more than four-score years; his wife passed away 
at the age of forty-five. They were the parents of 
eleven children, only two of whom are now living. 
For several generations the family has been identi- 
fied with agricultural pursuits. Henry Monforton 
grew to manhood upon the homestead farm, secur- 
ing his education in the district schools. On at- 
taining his majority he left home and traveled 
through Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota, and 
worked as a fisherman on the Great Lakes for 
three years. In 1863 he came to Montana, located 
on Horse prairie and engaged in rnining, one of 
his fellow laborers being W. A. Clark, the pres- 
ent LTnited States senator from Montana. He fol- 
lowed placer mining for two years, when he sold to 
advantage, and being quite well fortified in a finan- 
cial way, came to Gallatin county and engaged in 
farming in the valley of West Gallatin river. After 
two years he abandoned his claim and took up 
another on Middle creek, where he erected a log 
cabin for his hired man, and later built another, 
which he dignified with a shingle roof, probably 
the first building in the county to have this superior 
equipment. 

Mr. Monforton returned east for a visit, and on 
July 21, 1869, was united in marriage to Miss Ma- 
lina .Goyeau, who died the following year, as did 
also their infant child. On March 31, 1872, he 
consummated a second marriage, uniting his des- 
tinies with those of Miss Anna I. Boyle, who died 
January i, 1890, having been a cherished and de- 
voted companion and helpmeet during all the years 
of their wedded life. Concerning her ancestry more 
definite information may be found in the sketch of 
her brother-in-law, Christopher H. Waterman, ap- 
pearing on another page of this volume. Mr. and 
Mrs. Monforton became the parents of five chil- 
dren, namely: William H., who is married and has 
two children; Catherine A. is the wife of Mr. 
Telesphore Menard, and the mother of two chil- 
dren ; Mary A. is the wife of Mr. Arthur O. Jones ; 
Zoe and John who are still at the parental home. 
\fter our subject's first marriage he located at 



[68 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Spring Hill, Gallatin county, where he lived about 
two years, and then returned to the homestead ranch, 
located about seven miles west of Bozeman, where 
he devoted his attention to agriculture and stock- 
growing for a long term of years, being progressive 
and honorable in his methods and realizing a grati- 
fying success. In 1897 he retired from active la- 
bor, removing to the city of Bozeman, where he 
built a comfortable home wherein he is spending 
his declining years, honored and esteemed for his 
many excellent qualities by all who know him. He 
has a considerable amount of valuable realty 
in Bozeman, renting his properties and personally 
giving his attention to all business interests. He 
still owns his fine ranch, managed and operated by 
his son-in-law, Mr. Telesphore Menard, and others 
operated by his son and son-in-law. In the early 
days of Gallatin county Mr. Monforton served as 
county commissioner. He has ever been a stanch 
supporter of the Republican party; in religion he is 
a consistent member of the Catholic church; while 
he is an honored and valued member of the Gallatin 
County Pioneer Society. 



DR. PETER S. MUSSIGBROD.— The Doctor 
was born at Muskau, Germany, on October 3, 
1856, the third of the five children of Charles F. 
and Elizabeth Mussigbrod,the former of whom died 
in Berlin as the result of a surgical operation in 
May, 1896, and the latter at Warm Springs, Mont., 
in November of the same year. Their creditable 
record is set forth at length in the history of the 
pioneers of the state. The Doctor was thoroughly 
educated in the schools of his native land, having 
followed his graduation from the Latin school at 
Goerlitz by a thorough course of study in natural 
science and philosophy at Halle and Koenigsberg, 
which he finished in 1881, after which he was a 
successful teacher for eight years and then attended 
the University of Berlin, where he was graduated 
as a doctor of philosophy in 1890. 

He then engaged in practical mining at the 
Mansfield Copper Works at Eisleben, and was at 
the mining academy at Clausthal for one year and 
the academy at Freiberg, Saxony, for six months, 
to perfect himself in the technical knowledge of 
the branches of his intended profession, and in ad- 
dition took an educational journey to the mines of 
Austria and Hungary. In the spring of 1892 he 
emigrated to America, arriving in June at Montana. 



From July, 1892, to July, 1893, he was assayer for 
the Poorman mine at Burke, Idaho, and then, on 
account of the serious illness of a brother who was 
the manager of the insane asylum at Warm 
Springs, he was called thither and himself became 
the manager of the asylum for the firm of Mitchell 
& Mussigbrod, serving the establishment in 
this capacity until July, 1898. He then went 
to Garnet and started the Lead King mine with 
three men, a force which he has since increased 
to fifty. He also has a sawmill and a ten-stamp 
mill, and has been very successful m the opera- 
tion of all his properties, and yet is seemingly just 
now entering upon the enjoyment of their full pro- 
ductiveness. In addition to his mining interests 
he has a stock ranch in Big Hole basin in Beaver- 
head county, and is a partner of Mrs. Mary 
Mitchell and a half-owner of the Warm Springs 
insane asylum, for which he is also the present con- 
tractor. His brother, Eric, its former manager, 
died there in October, 1893. 

The Doctor has always been deeply interested in 
public aflfairs. In the Fatherland he rendered his 
portion of military service, being enlisted in the 
regiment of the Crown Prince, and promoted ser- 
geant with the qualification of serving as an officer. 
He was in the service as a reserve and on the active 
list for twelve years. In American politics he has 
been a constant and consistent Republican, but has 
never sought office, or assumed a leading position 
in his party. In religious affiliation he is identified 
with the Lutheran church. 

The career of Dr. Mussigbrod is a record of suc- 
cess well earned, of duty always faithfully per- 
formed, of unvarying courtesy and sincere polite- 
ness toward all men, and of a genuine, soulful and 
considerate hospitality, springing from the heart of 
the man and not begotten of any rules of formal 
social life. 



PETER MILLER, who with his two sons, Hen- 
ry and Christopher, comprise the firm of Mil- 
ler Brothers, of Lloyd, Choteau county, is one of the 
most extensive sheepgrowers in the vicinity of the 
Bearpaw mountains. At present he resides in 
Crawford county, Iowa, the sons having full charge 
of the 2,000-acre ranch. He was born in Ger- 
many in 1848, the son of Christopher and Sophia 
Miller, and up to the age of eighteen years availed 
himself of such educational advantages as were 
afforded by the public schools in his immediate 




<W. [A^/eAy 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1169 



vicinity. In 1864 he came with his parents to the 
United States, and the family settled in Crawford 
county, Iowa, where the father purchased a farm. 
Peter continued to reside with his parents until 
their death. 

Our subject came to Montana in 1890 and im- 
mediately located on a branch of Smoke creek, 
among the Bear Paw mountains. Here he secured 
160 acres of land, the nucleus of the present exten- 
sive ranch. Later he took his two sons, Henry 
and Christopher, into partnership with him in the 
sheep business and the firm name became Miller 
Brothers. They now own and operate eleven 
ranches, comprising 2,000 acres, and their band of 
sheep sum up a total of 12,000 head. Peter Miller 
married Miss Lizzie Claussen, daughter of Henry 
Claussen. They are the parents of three children, 
Henry, Christopher and Lilly. 

Henry Miller, the oldest son, was born in Craw- 
ford county, Iowa, December 23, 1875. He was 
reared on the old homestead and educated in the 
district schools of that vicinity. In 1891 he came to 
Montana and became one of the firm of Miller 
Brothers. He was married March 15, 1900, to 
Miss. Sophia Hofeldt, of California. Fraternally 
he is a member of Chinook Lodge, I. O. O. F., and 
Chinook Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 

Christopher Miller, the younger member of this 
enterprising firm, was born February 28, 1877, in 
Crawford county, Iowa. He received a fairly lib- 
eral education in the public schools, attending them 
during the winter months and devoting the sum- 
mer seasons to farm work on the homestead. He 
came to Montana with his father and brother. Po- 
litically his affiliations are with the Republican 
party, and fraternally he is a member of the Im- 
proved Order of Odd Fellows and Modern Wood- 
men of America. Himself and brother have sole 
charge of the ranch in Choteau county, Peter Mil- 
ler, the father, residing in Crawford county, Iowa. 
They are in every way successful in the sheep in- 
dustry, to which they devote the major portion of 
their attention. 



CAPT. JOHN E. MORAN.— Until the out- 
break of the Spanish-American war many 
years had passed since there had been the sound 
of war in the United States, but that the youthful 
Americans inherited the valor and loyalty of their 
forefathers was promptly shown. Forth went 



many veterans of the Civil war, alike from north 
and south, while the younger blood of the na- 
tion was quickened to active zeal. Among those 
who upheld the honor of Montana was the pop- 
ular Capt. John E. Moran. He is a native of 
Vernon, Windham county, Vt., born on August 23, 
1856. His father, William Moran, was born in 
County Kerry, Ireland, about 1825, and came to 
America in 1845, locating in Windham county, 
Vt., where he was a farmer until his death in the 
fall of 1897. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Nora Brosman, was born in County Kerry in 
1830, and their marriage was solemnized in Brat- 
tleboro, Vt., in 1852, where she still maintains 
her home. 

Capt. Moran secured his preliminary education 
in the schools of Brattleboro, graduatmg in the 
high school with the class of 1874, after which he 
completed a commercial course m Bryant & Strat- 
ton's Business College, in Chicago. He then 
clerked four years in the shoe store of his uncles, 
the Brosman Bros., of Chicago, and in 1878 went 
to Minneapolis, Minn., and opened a shoe store 
as Brosman Brothers & Moran, being thus asso- 
ciated with his uncles for four years, after which 
he conducted the business for himself until the 
spring of 1890, when he came to Montana, locat- 
ing in Great Falls, where he was employed in the 
Boston store for one year, and the next year was in 
charge of the shoe department of the store of Jo- 
seph Conrad. He then became identified with the 
police department of Great Falls as a sergeant, 
retaining this incumbency two and one-half years, 
thereafter serving four years as under sheriff of 
Cascade county, under Sheriffs Hamilton, Dwyer 
and Proctor, his long retention in this office giving 
unmistakable evidence of his efficiency and fidelity. 

In 1898 Capt. Moran was commissioned to raise 
a company of eighty-one men for service in the 
Philippines, he being then the captain of Com- 
pany A, National Guard of Montana, which com- 
pany, with its new recruits, was mustered into ser- 
vice. Proceeding to San Francisco, they em- 
barked for Manila in May and reached their des- 
tination on August 23, 1898. Capt. Moran served 
consecutively as captain of Company A, and from 
April to June, 1899, as commander of the Third 
Battalion of the First Montana Infantry, while 
in August he was assigned the captaincy of Com- 
pany L, Thirty-seventh United States Infantry. 
His company was mustered out of service at San 
Francisco on February 20, 1901, having rendered 



1170 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



valiant and efficient service in the Philippines, 
and Capt. Moran, on arriving in Great Falls, on 
February 25, met with an enthusiastic reception 
and was royally entertained by his friends who 
feted him for several days with banquets and 
receptions. After a period of rest, Capt. Mor- 
an identified himself as a clerk of the B. 
& M. C. C. & S. M. Co. In poHtics the Cap- 
tain gives support to the Republican party, and 
for a number of years he has been prominently 
and actively concerned in local political affairs. 
He was one of the first members of the volunteer 
fire department of Great Falls in 1891, and still 
retains his affiliation with it. He is a member of 
Rainbow Lodge, I. O. O. F., Great Falls Lodge 
No. 33, A. O. U. W., Camp No. 67, of the W. of 
W., and Rocky Mountain Camp, M. W. of A. 



ROBERT O. MORRIS.— On the roll of Car- 
bon county's honored and representative citi- 
zens is to be found the name of the subject of this 
review, who owns a fine ranch property on East 
Rosebud creek, twenty miles northwest of the 
city of Red Lodge, the county seat. He is recog- 
nized as one of the leading cattlemen of this sec- 
tion of the state, and has been somewhat promi- 
nent in public affairs of a local nature, ever main- 
taining a lively interest in all that conserves the 
progress and material prosperity of the county 
and state. Mr. Morris comes of stanch old Colo- 
nial stock, and his genealogical record is one 
of which he may be justly proud. He is a na- 
tive of the old Keystone state, having been born 
in the city of Bradford, McKean county, on March 
9, 1850, one of the six children of William and 
Eliza (Seamans) Morris, both of whom were born 
in that same county. Simon Morris, the grand- 
father of our subject, married a French lady of dis- 
linguished family, she being a descendant of Gen. 
McCreery, who came from France with Gen. La- 
fayette at the time of the Revolution, in which he 
rendered gallant service. The ancestry in the 
agnatic line is of English derivation, and the 
original American ancestors came to this coun- 
try in the early Colonial epoch. The father of our 
subject passed his entire life in Pennsylvania, en- 
gaged in fartning and stockraising. He died when 
Robert O. was a lad of eight years, having been 
summoned into eternal rest when but thirty-six 
years of age. Robert O. Morris received his early 



education in the public schools of his native county, 
and continued to reside on the old homestead until 
1874, when he became identified with the oil 
industry in Pennsylvania until the spring of 1883, 
coming thence to Montana and locating in the 
valley of the upper Yellowstone river. There for 
three years he devoted his attention to farming and 
stockraising, fair success attending his well di- 
rected efforts. He then disposed of his interests 
and moved to his present location, where he has 
continued the cattle business and developed one 
of the finest ranch properties in this section of 
the state, the permanent improvements being of 
exceptional excellence. He raises principally short- 
horn stock of high-grade type. At one time he 
kept an average of 1,000 head of cattle, but owing 
to the curtailment of the open range he has found 
it expedient to diminish the number. 

In politics Mr. Morris has ever been a zealous 
supporter of the Republican party and the prin- 
ciples for which it stands, and has served for a 
number of years in the office of justice of the 
peace. In 1895 he was the candidate of his party 
for county commissioner. He has been active in 
the cause of the party in a local way and is a 
member of the Republican central committee of 
Carbon county. A postoffice is maintained on his 
ranch, and is named Morris, in his honor. 

On November 7, 1884, Mr. Morris was united 
in marriage to Miss Nancy E. Brown, who was 
born in Missouri, whence she accompanied her 
brother on their removal to Montana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Morris have no children. 



T H. MURPHY, of Boulder, Jefferson count}, 
J Mont., is one of the leading attorneys of 
that city. Though young in years he presents 
results in life which show him to be on the high 
road to success and material prosperity. He was 
born at Sidney, Iowa, on June 3, 1865. His father, 
Joseph Murphy, has a remarkable legal record in 
Sidney, having there practiced law for thirty-five 
years. He is still living, but retired from the active 
business of his profession several years ago. He 
was born in Ireland in 1831, was reared in his native 
land and educated at Trinity College, Dublin. In 
1852 he came to the United States and settled in 
Indiana, where he taught school and later read 
law under the direction of Hon. Oliver P. Morton. 
He was admitted to practice in that state and just 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1171 



before the Civil war located at Sidney, Iowa, and 
began the practice of his profession. His wife, 
formerly Miss Elizabeth Richards, was a native of 
Ohio. Sometime in the early 'fifties her family 
removed to Iowa and settled near Sidney, where 
she still lives at the age of sixty-five years. Her 
father was Milton Richards, commonly known as 
"Squire" Richards. He was born in Ohio, where 
he was a farmer, and died in 1881. J. H. Murphy 
has three brothers and one sister now residing in 
southwest Iowa. 

Mr. Murphy was married at W'eeping Water, 
Neb., on December 28, 1892, to Miss Louisa E. 
Torrence, daughter of l!arnum S. Torrence. an 
agriculturalist, who lived in Nebraska twenty years 
and returned to Tabor, Iowa, in 1899. The mother 
of Mrs. Murphy was before her marriage Miss 
Harriet A. Smith, daughter of James L. Smith, of 
Tabor, Iowa. Mr. Smith was a member of the 
first class to graduate from Oberlin (Ohio) College, 
and subsequently he was one of the founders of 
Tabor College and of which he was a trustee for 
about forty years. He is still living and has ever 
taken a deep interest in all educational matters. 
The Montana history of Mr. and Mrs. Murphy 
dates from 1893, when they located at Boulder, and 
where their three children have been bom : Ralph 
Torrence, on November 3, 1893 ; Ra3'mond Rich- 
ards, on August 5, 1895, and Alice Eugenia, on 
April 24, 1900. Politically Mr. Murphy has al- 
ways affiliated with the Democratic party. In the 
November election of 1900 he was a candidate for 
county attorney, the first office he ever sought, an<l 
was elected. He is one of the chief officers of his 
lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America, and for 
five years he has been secretary of the Order of 
Pendo. He enjoys the confidence of a large circle 
of warm personal friends, not only in Boulder but 
throughout the state. 



BERNARD W. MURRAY.— One of the sterling 
pioneers of IMontana who rendered loyal ser- 
vice in preserving the integrity of the Union during 
the war of the Rebellion is Mr. Murray, conspicu- 
ously identified with early life on the frontier, and 
who is now one of the substantial and honored far- 
mers and stockraisers of Cascade county. He is 
a native of Michigan, having been there born Feb- 
ruary 20, 1839, the son of Harrison and Julia Mur- 
ray, natives of New York, the father being of 



stanch old Scotch lineage. The latter removed to 
Michigan when Bernard was a young lad and there 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. 
The mother of our subject passed away soon after 
the removal to Michigan. 

Bernard W. Murray was one of four children 
and early assumed the duties of life, having de- 
voted his time from his boyhood to such work as 
was within his power to perform. At the age of 
fifteen years he commenced to learn the trade of a 
wheelwright, to which he devoted his attention for 
many years. When the integrity of the Union was 
menaced by armed rebellion Mr. Murray manifested 
his patriotism by enlisting in September, 1861, as a 
member of the Thirty-fifth Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, with which he served until the expiration of 
his two-years term when he was honorably dis- 
charged on account of physical disability. Return- 
ing to Michigan at the close of his military service 
Mr, Murray there remained until the spring of 
1864, when he started on the long overland 
trip to Montana, driving a team of mules 
and being about ninety days in making the 
trip. He eventually reached A'irginia City 
where he engaged in carpenter w^ork, build- 
ing log cabins and receiving $6.00 per day. 
He continued to be thus employed until September 
when, in company with Thomas Burke and Albert 
Rogers, he proceeded to Last Chance gulch, where 
the capital city is now located, and in that vicinity 
engaged in prospecting. They struck an excellent 
lead in Dry gulch and met with success in their 
mining operations. The stampede to Last Chance 
encouraged them to remain there, and during the 
winter of 1864-5 they were engaged in building log 
cabins for the accommodation of miners. Mr. 
Murray was also concerned in the erection of the 
first hotel in Helena, the property eventually being- 
rented to Major Hutchinson, who paid a rental of 
$150 per month, our subject and his partner prefer- 
ring to devote their entire attention to their mining 
enterprise, with which Mr. Murray was identified 
until 1869, when he removed to Sun River Crossing, 
Cascade county, having been unsuccessful in the 
renting of his cabin properties at Helena. At Sun 
River he entered the employ of the Diamond R 
Company and engaged in the repairing of their 
wagons. In the spring of 1870 he went to work 
for Charles Jeffries, with whom he remained until 
the fall, when he resimied work with the Diamond 
R Company. During the summer of 1871 he was 
employed by the E. Kemp Wagon Company, and 



1 172 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



in the fall gave inception to his present line of enter- 
prise by starting in the cattle business, the ven- 
ture being based on the possession of fifty-four head 
of cattle, while he also purchased the James Cobuni 
ranch of 160 acres, and for which he paid $1,100. 
He continued in this line of business until 1882, 
when he sold out, having at the time 300 head of 
cattle. Mr. Murray then associated himself with 
a Mr. Dias in the general merchandise business at 
Sun River Crossing, and later effected a consoli- 
dation with George Steele. The combined enter- 
prise was most successful for a period of eighteen 
months, after which time its fortunes declined and 
eventually resulted in failure. Mr. Murray had 
previously taken up a homestead claim, and this 
represented his entire property interests at the time 
of the failure of the mercantile business, but he 
succeeded in saving the ranch by forestalling the 
sheriff in arrival at the place, his claim having not 
then been recorded. Since that time our subject 
has devoted his entire attention to the ranching and 
dairy business, and as the years have passed his 
success has been cumulative in character. He now 
owns in his home ranch 320 acres of excellent land, 
eighty acres of which are well adapted for culti- 
vation and have yielded good crops. In addition 
to the home place he also owns another eighty-acre 
tract in the same vicinity, his property being lo- 
cated two and a half miles east of the village of 
Sun River. 

In his political proclivities Mr. Murray is un- 
swerving in his allegiance to the Republican party, 
while fraternally he is a member of the Improved 
Order of Odd Fellows. On INIarch 14, 1883, Mr. 
Murray led to the marriage altar Miss Julia E. 
Price, who was born in Illinois, the daughter of 
William and Julia Price, the former of whom was 
born in Illinois and the latter in Ohio. The father, 
whose vocation was that of an engineer, was a 
stanch supporter of the Republican party. He en- 
listed for service in the Union army during the 
war of the Rebellion, and was killed in the battle of 
Chickamauga in September, 1863. Both he and his 
wife were devoted members of the Christian church, 
and of their six children Mrs. Murray and her 
brother, Nathaniel E., are the only survivors. 
Those deceased are Anna, Sarah E., Samuel H. 
and William H. The mother of Mrs. Murray 
passed away on the 26th of March, 1894. Our sub- 
ject and his wife hold membership in the Methodist 
church and are highly esteemed in all the relations 
of life. 



HON. HENRY L. MYERS.— It is the glory of 
our country and one source of its greatness 
that we have no legally created strata of society — 
no artificial division of men into classes, but all 
are equal before the law, and all have equal op- 
portunity, in theory at least, in the struggle for 
advancement. This puts each man upon his met- 
tle and inspires him to make the most of himself. 
Accordingly every profession and line of business 
has its hosts of self-made men who are ornaments 
to their calling and its strong and unyielding bul- 
warks. Among such. men adorning the legal pro- 
fession in Montana is Hon. Henry L. Myers, of 
Hamilton, Ravalli county. He is a native of Boon- 
ville. Mo., where his life began October 9, 1862. 
His parents were Henry M. and Maria M. (Adams) 
Myers, the former a native of Virginia and the lat- 
ter of Missouri. They had two children, the sub- 
ject of this sketch being the older. He began his 
scholastic training in the public schools of his native 
town, finishing at an academy located there, and 
when seventeen he went to work on the farm with 
his father, at different times thereafter teaching 
school, studying law and doing newspaper work. 

He made good progress in his legal studies, in- 
terrupted and made subsidiary to other pursuits 
■ as they were, and was admitted to practice in the 
supreme court of Missouri at the age of twenty- 
three, but continued in newspaper work for some 
time after his admission. Later he began legal 
practice at Boonville and continued it for a time at 
West Plains in his native state, but in 1893, seeing 
in the distant northwest more promising opportun- 
ities than in the older states, he came to Montana 
and opened an ofifice at Hamilton, \rhere he has 
been living and practicing ever since, with a grow- 
ing reputation in the profession and a correspond- 
ing growth of clientage. Until 1899 h^ practiced 
alone, but then formed a co-partnership with Robert 
A. O'Hara, which is still existent, the firm being 
among the leading ones in western Montana. Mr. 
Myers was elected county attorney in 1894 and 
re-elected in 1896. In 1898 he was elected state 
senator from his county, and in the session of the 
legislature which followed he distinguished himself 
by his readiness and tact in debate, his knowledge 
of public affairs, his broad philosophical views and 
his devotion to the interests of his constituents and 
the people of the stare in general. He was the orig- 
inator of senate bills nineteen and twenty, requiring 
courts to instruct juries before argument of counsel 
and of other important judicial measures. Mr. 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"73 



Myers is a member of the Masonic order, the 
Kjiights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He was married on July 9, 1869, at 
Hamilton, to Miss Nora Doran, daughter of T. M. 
and Mary Doran, prosperous farmers near that 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Myers have one child, a 
bright little daughter named Mary Annetta. Mr. 
Meyers is one of the leading attorneys of his sec- 
tion of the state, has won distinction on the hust- 
ings and in the legislative formula, has social quali- 
ties of a high order and is popular with all classes. 



IRA MYERS. — Montana is largely indebted for 
its rapid, development to Ira Myers, and as an 
honored pioneer of 1863 his fame is state-wide. 
He was one of the first to see the possibilities of 
stockraising, and the cattle firm of Myers, Buck 
& Co. will be long remembered by old-timers. 
He was born in Mansfield, Ohio, on December 18, 
1839, ^ so"^ of John P. and Susan (Arnett) Myers, 
Pennsylvanians who settled in Ohio in 1825. The 
great-grandfather of Ira Myers came from Ger- 
many, where were born his grandfather and father, 
the latter in 1805. Two of the sons and one 
daughter of their six children still survive. John 
P. Myers was a merchant all of his active life and 
both himself and wife were active members of the 
Methodist church. He died in 1865, his wife sur- 
viving him until 1889, when she died at the age 
of seventy-nine. 

Ira Myers received an academic education in 
Mansfield, Ohio, and in 1857 went to Davenport, 
Iowa, where he was a clerk, then he worked in 
St. Louis and Kansas City until 1859, when the 
Pike's Peak gold excitement drew him thither. 
He was one of ten who formed the Colorado 
City Townsite Company, which in 1859-60 did much 
in building up that place, and he also located 
160 acres in the famous "Garden of the Gods" 
adjoining the townsite. Then he went to Cali- 
fornia gulch in Colorado, the richest placer min- 
ing camp in the territory. He was soon elected 
sheriff of a district created before the organiza- 
tion of Colorado. In December, i860, he joined 
a party going to Baker's Park in the San Juan 
country. Deep snow in the mountains forced the 
postponement of their journey until spring. Then 
the journey was continued from Taos and Santa 
Fe under guidance of the famous Kit Carson. 
Baker's Park did not prove rich and Mr. Myers 



returned to California gulch, since Leadville, in 
July, 1861, and resumed mining until 1862, when 
he engaged in the hotel business in Denver until 
April, 1863, when he joined a company bound 
for Idaho, now Montana. They arrived in Ban- 
nack on May 15, 1863, and in June he was in 
the first great stampede to Alder gulch, where 
he engaged in mining. 

In 1865 he was succcessfully operating mines 
at Blackfoot and later in Helena, where he made 
his home. The first hydraulic mining in Montana 
was done at Diamond City in 1867, and Mr. 
Myers was one of the interested parties. Water 
cost $1.30 an inch, 200 inches was the average 
daily consumption, and $260 was daily paid for 
this necessity. This mining resulted in loss, and 
in 1868 Mr. Myers returned to Helena, where 
he remained until 1876, when with the opening of 
the Black Hills country he went to Deadwood, 
formed the Pioneer Ditch Company and was en- 
gaged in the construction of mining ditches until 
1878. In 1879 he was the organizer of the ex- 
tensive stock firm of Myers, Buck & Co. They 
purchased 2,300 head of cattle in Oregon which 
were driven to the range in Teton county. To this 
enterprise Mr. Myers gave the full strength of his 
wonderful business powers until 1883. In 1884 
he settled at Great Falls. Paris Gibson was then 
living in a tent on the bank of the Missouri, and 
was industriously engaged in platting the city. 

Mr. Myers at once constructed a sawmill with 
a daily capacity of 25,000 feet, then the largest 
mill in Montana east of the main range, continu- 
ing to operate it until 1892. Logs were brought 
to this mill from a hundred miles up the river, 
and it became an important factor in the building 
up of the city and the surrounding country. Mr. 
Myers is president and was one of the organizers 
of the Eldorado Canal Company, which owns 
1,500 acres of land and has constructed a ditch 
which carries 12,000 inches of water to a bench 
above the town of Choteau. In i888-Mr. Myers 
organized the Great Falls Electric Light Com- 
pany, which he operated until it was merged in 
the present company. In 1889, in connection with 
others, he originated the Great Falls Water Com- 
pany. He was largely interested in the building 
of the opera house at Great Falls, the develop- 
ment of the fair grounds and other matters of 
pubHc interest. He has disposed of his cattle, is 
opening promising mines in the Gold Butte or 
Sweet Water Hills and conducting real estate 



174 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



operations. In December, 1886, he married, at 
Minneapolis, Miss Catherine McGurk, a native of 
Ohio. They have two children, Ira J. and Charles 
S. In many of the business ramifications of Mon- 
tana's vast industries the influence and progres- 
sive spirit of Ira Myers have been important fac- 
tors, and by his sagacious and well-directed ef- 
forts the communities in which he has resided have 
been advanced and improved. 



WILLIAM VANCE MYERS, of Boulder, 
Jefferson county, is one of the finest types 
of the oldtime western miners, men who have 
blazed a path through the wilderness to gratify- 
ing success. They endured untold hardships, 
they braved dangers and they wrought faithfully 
and well that succeeding generations might find 
homes, prosperity and peace. William Vance 
Myers was born near Washington C. H., Fay- 
ette county, Ohio, on March 24, 1839. His father 
was Isaac S. Myers, born in eastern Ohio in 1810; 
his mother Elizabeth (Vance) Myers, was born 
in Oldtown, Ross county, Ohio, in 181 1. His 
grandfather Myers was a Virginian planter, de- 
scending from old Dutch stock. The maternal 
grandmother was Mary Scott, of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry, a native of Kentucky. Ihe paternal 
grandfather removed from Virginia to Ohio in 
1 810, locating in Fayette county, where he died, 
leaving a family of five sons and two daughters, 
and where grandmother Myers also died. Isaac 
S. Meyers was born in eastern Ohio and educated 
in the schools of that state. In 1858 he removed 
to Iowa with his family, six boys and four girls, 
settling in Adair county, where he continued his 
former vocation of farming. 

William Vance Myers remained on this Iowa 
homestead until i860, when he settled in Colorado 
where he -engaged first in placer and later in 
quartz mining. Three years were passed here 
with indifferent success ; then in 1863 he came 
to Montana, where he prospected for some time 
in the vicinity of Alder creek. In the fall of 1864 
he went to Last Chance gulch, the Mecca of so 
many early day miners, and by this time he had 
experienced nearly all the ups and downs of a 
miner's life. From Last Chance he removed to 
Over gulch, continued prospecting industriously 
and purchasing a claim that proved worthless. 



In the fall of that year he prospected along Mc- 
Clellan gulch with fairly good success. During 
1866 he roamed the state with a prospecting out- 
fit, but discovered nothing that would pay the 
expense of working. He worked in Nelson gulch 
for wages during the winter of 1866 and 1867, 
and in the spring went to Confederate gulch, 
where better fortune awaited him. Remaining 
there until July, 1869, he crossed the Missouri 
river to Indian creek and purchased another claim 
which developed fairly well. He remained in this 
locality until 1876, a part of the time being suc- 
cessfully engaged in merchandising. He then re- 
moved to Radersburg, still continuing to deal in 
merchandise. In the fall of 1878 he disposed of 
his business and, for the first time .in eighteen 
years, returned to the old homestead in Iowa 
for a year's visit. In 1879 Mr. Myers returned 
to Montana, this time locating in Crow creek val- 
ley and turning his attention to stockraising. He 
has successfully continued this business in that 
locality until the present. In 1881 Mr. Myers was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary Jackson, a native 
of northern Ohio, who departed this life in 1882. 
On November 7, 1896, he married the widow of 
the late Judge Elder. Politically he has ever 
been a Republican and has at all times manifested 
a lively interest in the success of that party. In 
1888 he was elected county commissioner of Jef- 
ferson county, serving four years. In 1894 he was 
elected county treasurer and was re-elected in 
1896. At present he is a member of the board 
of trustees of the Montana School for the Deaf and 
Blind, located at Boulder, and is an active mem- 
laer of the United 'V\^orkmen. 



\\1 ILLIAM T. NEILL.— The subject of this re- 
VV view, who is now incumbent of the respon- 
sible office of county commissioner of Fergus 
county, is regarded as one of the representative 
stockgrowers of Fergus county, having a valuable 
property and reaching prosperity's portals entirely 
through his own efforts. Such men merit a place 
on the pages of a work of this nature. 

Mr. Neill was born in the province of Quebec, 
Canada, on the 6th of December, 1859, being the 
son of William T. and Elizabeth Neill, the former 
of whom was born in Canada and the latter in 
Ireland. The father of our subject was engaged 
in farming and also operated saw and grist mills 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



"75 



in Ontario, and he was identified with the industrial 
activities of that section until his death, on the 
9th of August, 1877. He supported the liberal 
ticket in politics and both he and his wife, who is 
now living at the old home in Quebec, were com- 
municants of the Protestant Episcopal church. Of 
their ten children Edward B. is deceased, the others 
being Robert, Samuel, Martha, Annie, James, Wil- 
liam T., Reginald K., Joseph H. and Margaret. 

William T. Neill received a good common school 
education, but when fifteen years old he began to 
depend upon his own resources, first being employed 
at fami work and then becoming identified with 
the sawmilling industry. He was thus employed 
until March, 1877, when he decided to come 10 
Montana, which was not yet a state. He came to 
Helena and there engaged to work on a ranch in 
the neighboring valley, receiving $15 per month. 
He continued to work for others until the 
spring of 1887, when he came to Fergus county 
and located upon his present fine ranch, nine miles 
east of Garneill. Here he originally took up a 
homestead and desert claim, and to his estate he 
has since added until he now has an aggregate area 
of 1,600 acres and has been successfully 
engaged in the raising of high-grade cattle. Tn 
politics Mr. Neill is one of the wheelhorses of the 
Republican party in the county, and his eligibility 
for the office led to his being nominated for mem- 
bership on the board of county commissioners in 
the fall of 1900. He was accorded a gratifying- 
majority at the polls and is now rendering efficient 
service, ever aiming to protect the public welfare. 
Fraternally he has passed the ancient craft degrees 
in the order of Free and Accepted Masons. 

On the 25th of January, 1893, ^I^. Neill was 
united in marriage to Miss Garnette Currier, who 
was born in the state of Maine, the daughter of 
George E. and Elizabeth Currier, the first of whom 
was born in Massachusetts and the second at St. 
Johns, Newfoundland, whence the mother came 
to Montana and remarried with John McCourt, and 
now, a widow, resides at Garneill. Mrs. Neill was 
the only survivor of the four children of her par- 
ents, the others dying in infancy. The pleasant 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Neill is brightened by four 
interesting children, Margaret F., Frank B., Le- 
roy and Marian. We will here note that the post- 
office and village of Garneill were named in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. Neill, the first syllable of her 
Christian name and his surname being combined 
to form the appellation. 



T OHN W. NELSON.— Having passed through 
J the "Bad Lands" on his way west it is but 
natural that the traveler should seek to rest his 
eyes on some "garden spot," and this he does at 
Bozeman, Mont., and here John W. Nelson re- 
sides in a beautiful home with surroundings cal- 
culated to make a cheerful life. As one of the 
pioneers of Montana he must be specially men- 
tioned. He was born in Guilford county, N. C, 
April 15, 1835, the son of George and Celia 
(Woods) Nelson. For many generations the Nel- 
son family resided in the south, the forefathers 
coming to North Carolina fully 200 years ago. 
The paternal great-grandfather and the grand- 
father participated in the Revolution and several 
of the name took active part in the war of 1812. 
In 1840 George Nelson removed to Indiana, the 
family home for six years ; thence he went to 
Iowa to locate on land he had purchased of the 
Black Hawk Indians, but on account of the Black 
Hawk war his family did not join him until a 
year later, when they made there their permanent 
home, the father dying in 1882. 

John W. Nelson obtained an excellent educa- 
tion in the schools of Indiana and Iowa, and in 
keeping with the patriotism of his forefathers he 
enlisted in July, 1862, in Company B, Twenty- 
fifth Iowa Infantry. He was mustered in at Mt. 
Pleasant, and in September the regiment was or- 
dered to Helena, Ark., and in February, 1863, 
went to Vicksburg, at the head of Butler's Canal, 
La., where they bombarded the citadel until the 
surrender. In May, 1863, owing to sickness, Mr. 
Nelson was honorably discharged, came north 
and for a year remained on the old Iowa home- 
stead. By the advice of his physician Mr. Nelson 
started for California in Capt. Hensley's train. 
Arriving at Red Butte on the Big Platte, their 
party of seventy-two, hearing most favorable re- 
ports from Montana, determined to make that 
their destination, and, meeting no serious trouble 
from Indians, arrived in the Gallatin valley July 
14, 1864. Within a month Mr. Nelson had se- 
cured land in the West Gallatin country and en- 
gaged in farming and stockraising and remained 
there twelve years. 

He then purchased 300 acres five miles north- 
west of Bozeman, where he made his home until 
1897, when he removed to Bozeman, which has 
since been his place of residence. In 1883 he pur- 
chased the Howies place of 160 acres, and in 1897 
bought the Turner ranch, also of 160 acres, near 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



Story mill, and these properties he now owns 
and is constantly improving and developing them. 
He is engaged in general farming, raising fine 
crops of wheat, oats and barley. 

On January lo, 1853, Mr. Nelson was married 
to Miss Lavina A. Clark, of Ohio, daughter of 
William Clark, a native of Maryland, who had re- 
moved from Ohio to Iowa. They have nine chil- 
dren : Marshall T., a prosperous rancher residing 
near Bozeman ; George, a prominent business man 
of Bozeman ; John, a rancher residing eight miles 
north of Bozeman; Monroe, living on the home 
property five miles from Bozeman; William 
a rancher in Sweet Grass county, was born in 
Gallatin valley July 27, 1864, the first white child 
born in the valley; Frank, who owns property in 
Bozeman and follows his profession of engineer; 
Alice, wife of R. H. Williams, a rancher near 
Bozeman, and was born in the Gallatin valley 
July 2j, 1864; Louis, now in Sweet Grass county, 
is in the stock industry, and Lester, at home. Mr. 
Nelson has a herd of 250 head of cattle, in which 
his son Louis is interested. He is one of the rep- 
resentative men of Gallatin county, and is highly 
respected by those who know him the best. 



DR. WILLIAM PARBERRY.— Pleasurable in- 
deed it is to read the biography of a man who is 
an American of Americans and a loyal descendant 
of those who willingly fought for their country in 
its early struggles for independence and led with 
brave hearts the toilsome, dangerous lives of hardy 
pioneers. Such a son and man, inheriting the best 
of a long line of true-hearted ancestors, is Dr. Wm. 
Parberry, of White Sulphur Springs, Mont. Born 
in Bourbon county, Ky., March 12, 1833, to James 
M. and Susan (Neubill) Parberry, descendants of 
Virginia stock from the very earliest days of 
colonial times, but of Scotch-English and Irish 
lineage, he came into the storied heritage of two 
brave grandsires of Revolutionary fame and of a 
father who was in the famous Battle of the Thames, 
between the American troops under Gen. Har- 
rison and the English and Indian allies under Proc- 
tor in the war of 1812, where Tecumseh, the noted 
Indian chief, lost his life. His parents were mar- 
ried in Virginia and moved to Kentucky in the 
year 1826. They later moved unto a farm about 
ten miles from Jefferson City, Mo., his father 
dying there and his mother passing away at Lex- 



ington, Mo. Dr. Parberry was reared in Missouri 
with few educational advantages, but determined 
and persevering, he continued through his hard- 
ships and limitations, studying often by the flick- 
ering firelight when tired with the day's toil, until 
he was able to teach, securing his first school in 
1854 at Jefferson City, Mo. Soon afterward he 
began the study of medicine and took a course of 
lectures in St. Louis Medical College in 1856. He 
graduated from Jefferson Medical College, of Phila- 
delphia, in 1858, returning to Missouri and prac- 
ticing there until the winter of 1864, when he en- 
tered Bellevue Hospital Medical College. In the 
spring of 1865 he came to Montana, crossing the 
plains and located at Diamond City, then the county 
seat of Meagher county, where he was in active 
practice for many years. In 1877 he bought what 
was then known as Brewer's Hot Springs and laid 
out the town of White Sulphur Springs, becoming 
a prominent factor in its growth and present pros- 
perity. Here he still has his home, though he long 
since retired from the active duties of his profes- 
sion, as well as from those of his extensive stock 
ranch of 15,000 acres in Sweet Grass county. Dr. 
Parberry has by no means confined his talents and 
energies to self-aggrandizement, but has served his 
city and state in prominent business and official ca- 
pacities, which have not only made him well known 
as a man among men, but have conserved the best 
interests of the state. As president of the First 
National Bank of White Sulphur Springs, as as- 
sessor, county commissioner, county treasurer, a 
member of the territorial council in 1879, member 
of the constitutional convention, and senator from 
Meagher county to the First state legislature, he 
has shown himself to be a man of versatile talent, 
of far-reaching insight into good government, of 
irreproachable honor and of unbounded liberality. 
Dr. Parberry's political affiliations are with the 
Democratic party, which he has ever honored with 
unswerving loyalty and unstinted service. Frater- 
nally he is a Knight Templar in the Masonic order. 
June 26, 1872, Dr. Parberry married Miss Ma- 
tilda Hampton, of Alabama, daughter of Manoah 
and Cynthia (Mitchell) Hampton, of North Caro- 
lina, a lady of whom too much good can not be 
said and one in every way worthy the man whose 
productive and honorable life shines forth in the 
early history of Montana. As a physician Dr. 
Parberry had pre-eminently the courage of his con- 
victions and advocated principles then greatly in 
advance of his time, but which strongly tint the 



ifSPI "^ 




^/4. /^/r^^/7^^y 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 177 



trend of thought today, such as purity, simplicity, 
and an active out-of-door existence, either of hard 
work or of strenuous, exhilarating exercise. He 
believed that in a majority of cases the debility 
of the patient was curable through self-control, 
self-denial and active out-of-door life, rather than 
through the consumption of drugs, and unhesitat- 
ingly refused to administer medicine, often to his 
own loss financially, rather than assist nature to 
rebuild on a false foundation. As a man in business 
and social circles and as a philanthropist the state 
can show few equals. Shrewd, farseeing and ex- 
acting to the nicest details, he engineered success- 
fully the largest interests and safeguarded them 
from waste and loss ; but as a benefactor he is gen- 
erous to a fault and gives with impulsive extrava- 
gance. He is ever a friend to the meritorious poor 
and nothing delights him more than to educate those 
who can not educate themselves, often asserting that 
a man can not better serve his country and a fellow 
man than by lifting him to a higher level through 
education and thus enable him to help himself. He 
does not wait for appeals to his benevolence, for 
his heart, trained to sympathy through personal 
suffering in the school of adversity, is ever on the 
alert to see the needs of those around him and to 
suggest the best way to meet them with the per- 
sonal effort of the needy. Happy and enduring is 
the state whose foundation stones have been laid 
by such true, broad-minded, judicious builders as 
Dr. William Parberrv. 



\^ 



ILLIAM GALLATIN NELSON, who en- 
joys the distinction of being the first white 
child born in the beautiful and picturesque Gal- 
latin valley, is one of the solid and substantial 
citizens of McLeod, Sweet Grass county, Mont. 
He was born on July 27, 1864, the son of John 
W. Nelson, a biographical sketch of whom ap- 
pears in this connection. He was reared and edu- 
cated in the Gallatin valley, and found profitable 
employment on his father's ranch, and, until he 
was of legal age, William Gallatin Nelson remained 
on the homestead, devoting a portion of his time 
to operating his father's sawmill and a mill of his 
own, which was conducted in connection with a 
threshing machine business. 

In 1892 he closed out his interests in Gallatin 
county, which had been quite profitably prose- 
cuted, and went to Sweet Grass county with a herd 



of cattle and settled on the Boulder river. He 
first purchased 160 acres of land and to this he 
has recently added another quarter section, and 
now has 320 acres, the greater portion of which is 
now thoroughly irrigated and otherwise improved, 
making it one of the best ranches in the county. 
The principal crops are timothy hay and alfalfa, 
and in former years he has raised good crops of 
grain. He usually winters from 150 to 200 head 
of fine Hereford cattle. In 1900 he purchased the 
Bramble ranch, one of the handsomest ranches 
on the Boulder river, which contains 320 acres, 
well irrigated by living springs. This property is 
devoted to timothy, redtop and alfalfa. Mr. Nel- 
son has recently discovered and located a coal 
mine in the near vicinity of his ranch, and has 
in operation one tunnel of 500 feet and another 
of 260 feet. On November 20, 1889, Mr. Nelson 
was married to Miss Ebbie Banks, of Kansas. 
Their only child is John Leroy. 



JOHN W. NELSON.— One of the .popular citi- 
zens and representative business men of Ravalli 
county is Mr. Nelson, who has attained a position 
of no little prominence in connection with industrial 
and political affairs, being essentially the arti- 
ficer of his own fortunes and having a some- 
what varied career, and yet one that has ever 
been regulated by integrity, energy and perseve- 
rance. John W. Nelson was born at Mclndoe 
Falls, Caledonia county, Vt., on August 4, 1854, 
the second of the twelve children of William H. 
and Margaret Nelson, both Vermonters and repre- 
sentatives of old New England families. He is in- 
debted to the excellent public schools of Vermont 
for his early education and he continued his studies 
until he was eighteen, passing the last year in the 
high school. He then went to Boston and was a 
brakeman on the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

In 1873 Mr. Nelson came to the Pacific coast 
and was connected with railroad work in California 
until 1879, having headquarters principally in San 
Francisco and Santa Cruz. In 1879 he went to 
Oregon, and thereafter was a conductor on the 
Northern Pacific Railroad on different runs and 
coming as far eastward as Helena. From. 1887 until 
1895 he was conductor on the Montana Union di- 
vision of the Northern Pacific, save for the two 
years he served as sheriff of Deer Lodge county, 
having been elected in the fall of 1892. At the 



II78 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



expiration of his official term, in 1895, Mr. Nelson 
removed to Hamilton, and here he engaged in the 
clothing business, conducting the Valley Clothing 
Store, and also having other business interests in 
this city. He has secured an excellent supporting 
patronage, enjoys marked popularity and has an 
attractive home in Hamilton, the same being a 
center of genial hospitality. He gives his political 
support to the Populist party, and fraternally is 
identified with the Knights of Pythias. In Novem- 
ber, 1887, in Butte, Mr. Nelson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Emma Toland, the daughter of James 
Toland, one of the earliest living pioneers of the Bit- 
ter Root valley, having located in Stevenville in 
1857. He is now a resident of Hamilton. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nelson have three children, John W., Hazel 
Ann and William James. 



JAMES L. NEIHART, in whose honor is named 
the city of Neihart, Cascade county, is a man 
highly and justly esteemed for his progressive 
views, liberal, broad-minded opinions and devoted 
interest in the municipality in which he resides. 
It can be truthfully said that he has, in the course 
of many years, won the respect and confidence of 
all with whom he is acquainted, and the circle is 
a large one. He was born in Williams county, 
Ohio, September i, 1851, the son of James and 
Theresa Neihart. The mother was a native of 
Wurtemberg, Germany, and the father of Lancas- 
ter, Pa. During the early years of his career the 
latter followed the business of a wheelwright, but 
later devoted his attention to farming, in which he 
achieved success. The parents were members of 
the United Brethren church ; the father was a stanch 
Democrat and served several successive terms .ts 
justice of the peace. He died June 16, 1881, and 
was followed by his wife, August 17, 1892. Seven 
children survive them, Elizabeth, Phoebe, Mary, 
Jacob, Nicholas, Jonah and James L., the subject 
of this biographical mention. 

.A^lthough he diligently improved every edtica- 
tional advantage that was offered him, it must be 
confessed that the scholastic lore he acquired in 
those early days was limited. However, he made 
good progress in his studies, and in after years was 
enabled to teach others. Until he was seventeen 
years of age he materially assisted his parents on 
the farm; but he longed for wider business 
experience ; accordingly he entered a general store 



in the capacity of a clerk, at a salary of $20 per 
month. This salary was subsequently increased 10 
$60; shortly afterward he was given the position of 
grain purchaser with a salary of $150 per month. 
In 1876 Mr. Neihart came to Montana, settling 
first at Bozeman; but the subsequent two years 
were passed at Alder gulch and Virginia City in 
mining enterprises. While at Bozeman he taught 
one term of winter school. The greater portion of 
his time, until the spring of 1879, was spent in pros- 
pecting. He then went to Fort Benton, and thence 
to the Highwood mountains, where he located a 
squatter's claim twenty miles south of the fort, 
upon which he remained until 1881, when he ex- 
changed it for horses and cash. Removing to the 
vicinity of Barker, Cascade county, Mr. Neihart 
again began prospecting and mining, but with no ap- 
preciable success, and, becoming dissatisfied, he re- 
moved to his present place April 15, 1882. Since 
then he has been heavily interested in mining, and 
in the various enterprises has gained success. 

He was married December 14, 1889, to Mrs. 
Sarah E. Sutton, an estnnable lady and the 
mother of three children, Ida, May and Henry Sut- 
ton, all members of her present family. She was 
born in California, her parents being John W. and 
Nancy Patrick. The mother was a native of Lou- 
isiana, and the father a Kentuckian by birth. He 
was one of the '"forty-niners," and at present re- 
sides in the vicinity of Augusta, Cal., at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-two years. The mother died 
April 15, 1899. Four children survive her. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Neihdrt have been born one 
child. Myrtle. The parents are members of the 
Baptist church. 



DENNIS NEVIN.— Among the honored pio- 
neers of the great west was the subject of this 
memoir, who was prominently identified with min- 
ing enterprises in various sections and whose 
untimely death was the result of an accident at 
Butte city in the mine of which he was foreman. 
His widow long survived him, rearing her family 
and proving the strength and nobility of her na- 
ture, winning the love of a wide circle of friends 
and the reverence of her children, who may well 
"rise up and call her blessed." To her, as well 
as to the husband who proceeded her into eternal 
rest, is due a tribute in this publication. Dennis 
Nevin was a native of the Emerald Isle and a 
scion of stanch old Irish stock, the date of his 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



[79 



nativity having been 1844. He received his edu- 
cational training in the parochial and national 
schools of Ireland, where he remained until he 
attained the age of twenty years, when he set 
forth to seek his fortunes in America. He first 
located in Massachusetts and attended the public 
schools of that state for a time. He was there 
employed for a few years and then removed to 
California, where he engaged in placer mining for 
a score of years. Mr. Nevin then removed to Vir- 
ginia City, Nev., turned his attention to the gro- 
cery business, and was more or less concerned in 
mining in that section. In 1884 he came with his 
family to Montana, locating in the city of Butte, 
becoming prominently concerned in her great min- 
ing industry. He was foreman of the Wake-Up- 
Jim mine and had been there engaged but a few 
months when he met his death as the result of 
an accident in the mine, passing away on Septem- 
ber 16, 1885. He was a man of high principles 
and inflexible integrity ot character, and a devout 
member of the Catholic church. While a resident 
of Nevada he held for nine years the position of 
treasurer of the Miners union at Virginia City, 
and in 1882 he was elected treasurer of Storey 
county, that state. While in discharge of the 
duties of this office Mr. Nevin was held up by 
masked men, who covered him with revolvers and 
then made away with $8,000 of the county's money, 
locking our subject in the vault of his office and 
making good their escape. No blame, however, was 
attached to the treasurer. 

In politics he gave his support to the Democratic 
party, in whose cause he took an active in- 
terest : fraternally he was identified with the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen ; was a mem- 
ber of the Emmett Guard in Virginia City, Nev., 
and was known as a fine shot, his chief diversion 
being hunting, through the medium of which he 
found pleasure and recreation. In the year 1870 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Nevin to Miss 
Winnifred Donahue, who was born in Ireland and 
who, with her nine children, survived the husband 
and father. The responsibility which thus de- 
volved upon the devoted mother would have dis- 
heartened a less resolute and noble nature, but 
Mrs. Nevin never flinched nor wavered, and how 
well and with what great self-abnegation she 
planned and labored for the sake of her family 
none but her children can fully appreciate, while 
to her they will pay a perpetual tribute of rever- 
ence and love. Her death occurred on December 



23, 1900, and the position she held in the esteem 
of the community is indicated in the following 
excerpts from articles appearing in the local press 
at the time of her demise : 

"The year after her arrival in Butte Mrs. Nevin 
suffered the loss of her husband, the bereavement 
being a sad blow and the widow being left with a 
large number of children. She showed great en- 
ergy and ability, and during the following years 
conducted a boarding house on Summit street with 
success, and earned the esteem of all with whom 
she came in contact, either in a business or social 
way." Speaking of the funeral obsequies a local 
paper gave the following: "The esteem in which 
the deceased lady was held was reflected in the 
vast procession that followed her remains to the 
grave. So large was the number of friends who 
came to pay their last respects to the dead that 
every available carriage in the livery stables of 
Butte was pressed into service to convey the 
members of the wide circle of mourners to the 
place where the remains were laid to rest. The 
spontaneous tribute paid to the deceased by the 
citizens of Butte who had known her in life was 
too genuine to admit of mistake. It was the sin- 
cere sorrow of true friends, who deeply regretted 
the loss the community sustained when Mrs. 
Nevin was called from a well ordered life." 

The services were conducted from St. Patrick's 
church, of which the deceased was a devoted and 
consistent member, and were very impressive in 
character, the solemn requiem high mass being 
read, and the remains were laid to rest in the 
Catholic cemetery. 

Of the nine children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Nevin two are deceased — Mattie and Francis— 
and the others are still residents of Butte, where 
they were reared and educated. They are: 
Mamie J., one of the first graduates of the Butte 
high school, and a member of the class of 1888, 
is now the wife of P. S. Sullivan, who is engaged 
in the hotel business in Butte ; Martha R. is the 
wife of Thomas F. Sheehan, who is devoting his 
attention to the liquor business ; George F. is a 
machinist, and holds the position of foreman in 
the Green Mountain machine shops, and the others 
of the family are Margaret E., William H., Charles 
P. and Winnifred. Charles completed his educa- 
tion in All Hallows College, Salt Lake City, in 
1899, and is now timekeeper at the Never Sweat 
mine. William is also identified with the mining 
industrv in this gountv. 



i8o 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



OSWALD B. NEVIN.— The life of Mr. Nevin 
has been one of extreme contrasts, for he left 
a home notable for culture and refinement, in- 
duced through genealogical lines of patrician or- 
der to participate in the wild and adventurous 
life of the unsettled western plains and moun- 
tains where his experiences were of most interest- 
ing order. He was born at Helena, St. Lawrence 
county, N. Y., on February 2, 1845. His father, 
Benjamin Nevin, was born in County Down, Ire- 
land, on September 20, 1797, and on January 28, 
183s, he married Miss Sarah Woodbury, born in 
New Hampshire on October 6, 181 5. Of their 
four sons and two daughters Oswald B. Nevin 
was the fifth. An old family bible states that his 
grandfather was a John Nevin, born in County 
Down, Ireland, who married there Jemima Moor- 
head McMain on August 5, 1795. The bible was 
printed in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1797, and on 
the inside of the folding cover is printed the name 
of Benjamin Nevin, with the date 1815. Mr. Nevin 
possesses finely executed portraits in oil of his 
grandfather and grandmother, showing the old time 
powdered wigs, ruffles, etc. Late in life John 
Nevin came to the United States, and here passed 
his closing years of life in the home of his son 
Benjamin, who was agent and representative of 
a wealthy Scotchman, who had a large grant of 
land in New York. 

Oswald B. Nevin after receiving good educa- 
tional advantages under private tutors until he 
was about fifteen years old started upon his life of 
adventure in the great northwest by entering the 
employ of the Northwest Fur Company, and thus 
made his first visit to the territory that is now 
Montana, continuing thus occupied for five years 
and stationed alternately at Fort Benton and Fort 
Union. The employes carried their guns when- 
ever they ventured outside the forts, as the In- 
dians were ever ready to attack them and many 
met death at their hands. In 1863 Mr. Nevin 
went down the Missouri by flatboat, not being 
molested by the Indians, and proceeding to New 
York, entered the Eastman Business College at 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he completed a course 
of study, receiving the degree of master of ac- 
counts. His diploma, which is displayed in his 
home, bears the date of February 29, 1864. After 
his graduation he was employed as a bookkeeper 
in Chicago for eighteen months, after which he 
passed through Minnesota, and went down the 
Red river from Fort Abercrombie to Fort Garry, 



the site of the present city of Winnipeg, B. C. 
Here he outfitted with Red river carts, constructed 
entirely of wood, and started up the Saskatchewan 
where he followed hunting and trapping until the 
fall of 1879, within this time seeing no white men 
except when making trips to the trading posts 
and often remaining in the wilds two years with- 
out making a trip. The Indians were not hostile, 
and beaver, otter, mink, etc., were plentiful, while 
moose, elk, caribou, bears, wolves, etc., were in 
abundance. 

In the fall of 1879 ^'If. Nevin located on the 
American Fork, where he hunted for two years, 
after which he came to Sweet Grass county, Mont. 
Here he engaged in raising sheep, selecting the 
Merino type as his favorite, and his first clip of 
wool was sold to Hon. Paris Gibson at Fort Ben- 
ton, and he had to haul it 150 miles. In 1900 
Mr. Nevin sold his herd of sheep of about 6,000 
head, and is now exclusively raising cattle on an 
extensive scale, his ranch of 4,000 acres, purchased 
of Flowerree & Lowry, being located five miles 
southeast of the village of Melville. Mr. Nevin 
is a man of magnificent physique, standing six 
feet one and one-half inches, as straight as an 
arrow and endowed with great strength and en- 
durance. In his prime he weighed 220 pounds and 
was noted for his agility and fleetness. His brother, 
John H. Nevin, was six feet four and one-half 
inches in height, a model of virile strength. David 
A. Nevin, another brother, served four years as 
a captain of the Sixteenth New York Cavalry in 
the Civil war, and as judge advocate, dying in 
Panama. 

Mr. Nevin is a thorough mountaineer and 
plainsman, and more than once he has shown 
United States scouts their way back to camp. 
He enjoys unmistakable popularity and is honored 
by all who know him. On January 15, 1894, Mr. 
Nevin was united in marriage to Miss Marion 
Tintinger, a native of Iowa, the daughter of. Nich- 
olas Tintinger, one of the early settlers of that 
state. In the fall of 1900 Mr. Nevin was elected 
a county commissioner, and has already proved 
that he is eminently fitted for this important office. 
Politically he gives an unequivocal support to the 
Republican party, while fraternally he is identified 
with the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Nevin was per- 
sonally acquainted with Sitting Bull, who fre- 
quently partook of his hospitality. He also knew 
the father of this doughty chieftain, the senior 
Sitting Bull, a hunchback, but possessing much 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1181 



virile strength and agility, while Sitting Bull, Jr., 
was a fine specimen of physical manhood. After the 
Custer massacre the Indians removed to Canada, 
whence bands used to return on hunting expedi- 
tions, the soldiers being ever on the alert to pre- 
vent depredations, and once Mr. Nevin saw a 
band of Indians crossing Milk river only a short 
distance from the headquarters of the command- 
ing general. 



HENRY E. NEWKIRK comes of stanch old 
Colonial stock and his maternal great-grand- 
father was an active participant in the war of the 
Revolution, having been a valiant soldier in the 
Continental army. Mr. Newkirk located on his 
present ranch in Carbon county at a time when 
said county was an integral portion of the Crow 
Indian reservation, and has forged forward to a 
position of unmistakable prominence among the 
representative farmers and stockgrowers of this sec- 
tion, his course having been such as to commend 
him to the unqualified confidence and good will of 
the people of the community, while he may be con- 
sistently termed one of the pioneers of Carbon 
county and one of its leading citizens. Mr. New- 
kirk is a native of New Jersey, having been born 
at Daretown, Salem county, on February 10, 1861, 
the fourth in order of birth of the eight children 
of Isaac and Frances (Stanger) Newkirk, natives 
of New Jersey, as was also the paternal grand- 
father, who bore the name of Isaac Newkirk. The 
father of our subject passed his entire life in New 
Jersey, where he followed agricultural pursuits un- 
til his death, which occurred in the year 1888. Af- 
ter receiving excellent preliminary training in the 
public schools of his native county, Henry E. New- 
kirk became a student in Philadelphia, where he took 
a partial course. In 1881 he started for the north- 
west, his first location being at White Sulphur 
Springs, Meagher county, Mont. Soon after his ar- 
rival he became identified with the ranching indus- 
try, and there continued to reside for a decade ; 
from thence he came to what is now Carbon county, 
the district then being a portion of the Crow Indian 
reservation. He came here in 1891, bringing a band 
of sheep which he had previously pastured in the 
valley of the Smith river, for several years the 
scene of his operations. Upon arrival in the new 
location he settled upon a squatter's claim, and 
when this portion of the reservation was thrown 
open to settlement he made permanent location on 



Red Lodge creek, twenty miles north of the city of 
Red Lodge. Here he has a fine ranch property com- 
prising 480 acres, his attention being principally 
given to raising high-grade sheep with gratifying 
success, his average band aggregating about 5,000 
head. Mr. Newkirk is progressive and energetic 
in his policy, and has made the best of improve- 
ments upon his ranch, one of the most attractive in 
this section. A portion of the ranch is under ade- 
quate irrigation and yields excellent crops of al- 
falfa and hay. Mr. Newkirk also raises cattle upon 
a somewhat minor scale. In sheep he principally 
raises Spanish Merino and Cotswold types, which 
render him the best returns for his enterprise in 
this line. In all the relations of life his actions are 
characterized by inflexible integrity, and he thus 
commands the respect and high regard of the com- 
munity, being recognized as one of Carbon county's 
representative citizens. Upon the organization of 
Carbon county Mr. Newkirk was chosen the first 
clerk of the court, retaining the position for two 
years and rendering efficient service. In political 
proclivities he is a supporter of the Republican 
party, has shown strong interest in all matters that 
will promote the material prosperity of the county 
and state, being public-spirited to a marked degree. 
Fraternally he is identified with the ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, in which he has taken the 
ancient craft degree, being a master Mason. 



PATRICK NIHILL.— This extensive stock- 
man has been a resident of Montana since 
1892. He was born in the province of Ontario, 
Canada, February i, 1864, a son of Edward and 
Margaret Nihill, also natives of the Dominion, 
where the father was a successful farmer, and a 
Liberal in politics, and both are members of the 
Catholic church. They are the parents of eight 
children, of whom Patrick was the first born. 

His educational advantages were very limited, 
for at the early age of ten years he was obliged 
to aid in supporting the family, with whom he 
remained until he was long past his majority. 
He then went into the southern part of the United 
States, and engaged in building railroads. In 
1892 he came to Montana, and, locating in the 
Philbrook neighborhood, engaged in ranch work 
at a compensation of $35 per month, first in the 
employ of N. A. Lewis and later with C. M. Godell. 
After following this occupation two years he de- 



Il82 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



voted one year to stage driving, and after that 
was three and a half years in the hotel business, 
six months at Philbrook, one year at Utica, and 
two years at Stanford. In 1898 Mr. Nihill pur- 
chased 1,000 acres of his present ranch, to which 
he has since added 500 more. His principal crops 
are grain and hay, which he raises in large quan- 
tities and of fine quality. He is also extensively 
engaged in sheepraising. 

In politics Mr. Nihill is an earnest Republican, 
and fraternall}' he is an Odd Fellow. He was 
married March 6, 1895, to Miss Anna Nicholson, 
a native of England, and daughter of Thomas and 
Jane (Armstrong) Nicholson, also EngHsh by na- 
tivity, who came to America in 1893 and located 
at Philbrook, where they at first rented a ranch 
on Bufifalo creek and took sheep on shares. Later 
they removed to their present ranch, which Mr. 
Nicholson acquired by purchase, and to which he 
has added until he has 700 acres. His principal 
industry also is raising sheep. 

Mr. Nihill was reared in the teaching of the 
Catholic church, while his wife's parents were 
Presbyterians. They are the parents of three 
children, John, Albert and Archibald. Mr. Nihill 
is an energetic follower of his business, looks after 
its details personally, and has won success. He 
is classed among the large taxpayers of Fergus 
countv. 



ROBERT WORTHINGTON NOBLE, presi- 
dent of the Noble & Wyeth Improvement 
Company, of Whitehall, Jefferson county, is one of 
the leading business men of that village. He was 
born at Edgewood, Iowa, on November 11, 1850, 
the son of D. B. and Minerva (Peet) Noble. The 
father was a native of Bloomfield, Ontario county, 
X. Y., and the mother of Farmersville in Cat- 
taraugus county. From New York they removed 
to Iowa, where they were married and settled down 
to a life of pioneer farming. In i860 he came to 
Pike's Peak, where he was engaged in mining. In 
1865 he removed to Virginia City, Mont., and 
there developed the Noble mine in 1868, continuing 
to work upon it until his death, which occurred 
September 19, 1899, leaving two sons and four 
daughters as his survivors. 

The early days of R. W. Noble were passed in 
Iowa, where he received the education of the 
public schools which he supplemented by a course 
at the Iowa College, an excellent institution located 



at Grinnell, Iowa. His mother and one son re- 
moved to Montana in 1870, and two years later Mr. 
Noble followed them, and in 1873 he was joined by 
two of the sisters. Two other sisters who were 
married remained in Iowa. On his arrival Mr. 
Noble became a partner with his father in the de- 
velopment of the Noble mine, then quite productive, 
and continued here until 1889, when, in company 
with J. H. Wyeth, of St. Louis, he bought into the 
Whitehall Townsite Company. In 1887 Mr. Noble 
bought a ranch near Twin Bridges, Madison 
county, on which he made his home. Several 
other ranches were purchased by the partners in 
addition to the townsite and they also bought a 
number of sheep and horses. On the death of his 
father, Mr. Noble assumed sole charge of the 
Noble mine and in 1898 he organized the Noble & 
Wyeth Improvement Company, of which he is 
president. 

On July 1, 1880, Mr. Noble was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Minnie Brooke, of St. Louis, Mo. 
She was the eldest daughter of Maj. Brooke, and 
born on April i, 1860. They have had eight chil- 
dren, Lloyd Marvin, who died June 2, 1901, while 
attending school in Helena, having graduated five 
days previously from the business department of 
the Montana Wesleyan University. He was a 
young man of unusual promise and his sudden de- 
parture was a severe blow to his parents and man\' 
friends. His funeral occurred at Whitehall and 
was one of the largest ever witnessed in the valley. 
The other children are Rachel Grace, Mallory, 
Frank Worthington, deceased; Edward Gant, 
Daniel B., Mary Viola and Elizabeth Ruth. 

Fraterna^lly Mr. Noble is a member of the United 
Workmen and the Maccabees. Politically he is a 
strong Republican, but never an aspirant for office. 

At the opening of the Nez Perces war Mr. 
Noble joined a company with Col. Callaway as cap- 
tain, organized at Mrginia City, where the response 
to the governor's call had been prompt. Samuel 
Word and S. R. Buford endeavored to prevail on 
the Sheridan company, which consisted of 200 men, 
to join them, but on the first call only six came out. 
R. W. Noble. Henry Fishback, Sergeant Hall. 
George O'Dell, Henry Patrick and John Alla- 
baugh. They went to a point on Beaver Head, near 
the present city of Dillon, to gain information of the 
movements of the Indians. They discovered that 
they had passed by Bannack and were killing the 
settlers at the head of Horse Prairie creek, four 
men having already been slain. Mr. Noble's party 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 183 



) 



moved up to Black Tail Deer creek, and then were 
joined by others and all rode to William's Junc- 
tion and later joined Gen. Howard, who was in com- 
mand of about 250 United States soldiers, and 
whose policy in organizing this expedition Mr. 
Noble heartily endorsed. The expedition went to 
Eagle Rock, Idaho, followed by the trail leading 
toward Henry lake, and on the night of Sunday, 
August 19, 1877, they camped at Camas meadows, 
but saw no Indians. About an hour after midnight 
the Indians made a dash through the picket lines 
and surprised the camp. Most of the volunteers 
ran across the creek, only thirteen remaining, but 
they soon rallied and began firing on the Indians, 
who were surprised at this sudden change of front 
and quick response, and fifed recklessly and with- 
oiit aim. In their first charge, however, the In lians 
had killed one horse and stampeded nineteen others 
and 115 pack mules. Mr. Noble and Thomas 
Ferrell saw three other fine horses following 
after the Indians and the two men hastened 
to recover them, a dangerous thing to do, 
but they succeeded in saving the horses and 
returning in safety. Capt. Norwood and his men 
then started in pursuit of the Indians. They were 
soon overtaken, but the superior force of the 
Indians surrounded them and kept them in danger 
until they were relieved by Gen. Howard. Then 
the savages retreated a short distance and made 
a stand. The resulting fight lasted four hours and 
forty minutes, with the loss of one soldier killed, 
three mortally and four badly wounded. Hov^' 
many Indians were killed is not known, as th-'y 
carried off their dead and wounded. Mr. Noble 
was among the volunteers detailed by Gen. Howard 
on the next day to convey the wounded to Virginia 
City, 150 miles distant. He provided a light team 
and wagon to carry the bedding and saddles and 
teams for the wounded, while those of the escort 
who had lost their horses went on foot. On the 
return Mr. Noble stopped at his home in Sheridan, 
having been gone eleven days. The work of the 
volunteers had been successfully accomplished in 
driving the Indians as far away as possible from the 
settled portions of the state. 



ROBERT NEWMIRE, after an eventful life in 
the trans-Mississippi country, is now located 
on a highly improved sheep ranch near Big Tim- 
ber, Sweet Grass county, and surrounded by every 



evidence of prosperity. He is a German, born at 
Wurtemberg, on May 3, 1848. His parents were 
George and Gertrude (Snyder) Newmire, and Rob- 
ert was one of a family of three sons and five 
daughters. The father was a stonemason and 
plasterer, and had a small farm. Mr. Newmire 
learned the trade of stonemason and plasterer in 
Germany, and in 1868, before he was twenty-one, 
he came to the United States, locating at Utica, 
N. Y., where an uncle resided. For five years 
Mr. Newmire burned Hme at and near Utica, 
and then removed to Salt Lake City, and for two 
years was in the employ of the Germania Refining 
Works Company, going thence to Denver, Colo., 
and soon returning to Salt Lake and taking up his 
former employment. A year later he moved to 
San Francisco, worked in the rolling mills and in 
the refining works for a few months, and then 
made a short stay in Los Angeles. Subsequently 
he was employed in the smelter at Sierra Guarda, 
then went to the Dead valley, purchased real estate 
and engaged in building vaults. After a six- 
months stay the camp broke up and he removed 
to Round valley, and for four months followed 
placer mining. 

Having passed the winter in California Mr. 
Newmire went over into Rocklyn, Nev., and then 
to the Black hills, where he prospected unsuc- 
cessfully. One year was then passed at Fort 
Custer in burning lime, venturing then on a pros- 
pecting trip among the Big Horn mountains. 
Scouts, however, warned his party of their im- 
minent danger from Indians, and they rapidly 
made their way back to Fort Custer, from whence 
he went to the site of Billings, locating on a ranch 
at Park City, remaining five years and meeting 
with fairly successful results. The two following 
years were spent at Clark's Fork, where he opened 
a small and prosperous store, and then he moved 
to the Stinking Water creek and for three years 
conducted the postoffice, stage station and a store. 
Having disposed of his stock he secured con- 
tracts for building irrigating ditches and he then 
procured a lucrative contract on the Rocky Fork 
Railway. Three years were afterwards passed in 
mining near Boulder, and he then came to Big 
Timber creek, where he purchased 640 acres of 
land of the Big Timber Bank, and began fatten- 
ing sheep for mutton, carrying 5,000 through the 
winter and feeding 600 tons of alfalfa. Mr. New- 
mire has 250 acres of his land under irrigation 
and it produces fine crops. In the past he has 



:i84 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



done considerable sheep feeding on contract, and 
has recently completed a fine two-story brick resi- 
dence, while his outbuildings, sheds, corrals, etc., 
are of the most substantial description. As show- 
ing the honesty of Montana pioneers Mr. New- 
mire relates that while he was merchandising at 
Clark's Fork canyon, he would sometimes be ab- 
sent for two weeks, leaving his store wide open. 
The patrons would take what they wished to pur- 
chase and leave the proper money or skins 
for payment, or charge themselves with the amount 
on the book and on his return he rarely found 
anything unnecessarily disturbed. 



SIMON PEPIN, of Havre, is one of the pio- 
neers of Montana, well known throughout the 
state and adjoining territory as a brave, constant 
and industrious freighter, a successful and pro- 
gressive ranchman and stockraiser, and a capable 
and resourceful financier and man of business. 
He was born at St. Michel, Canada, December 20, 
1840, of French parentage. His father, Samuel 
Pepin, was a native of the same place, as was 
also his mother, Mary (Peprino) Pepin. They 
were well-to-do but unassuming farmers, and 
lived a quiet, respectable life among their neigh- 
bors, by whom they were much esteemed. His 
mother, however, died when he was four years 
old ; and when he was sixteen, after securing a lim- 
ited education in his native town, he left home and 
went to Saco, Me., and there worked in a brick- 
yard from 1856 to 1863. In the spring of the lat- 
ter year he came to Montana, making the trip over- 
land from Omaha in charge of a team of cattle, 
traveling by way of Salt Lake City to Virginia City, 
where he arrived in November. The next spring he 
entered the employ of the famous Diamond R 
Freighting Company, and remained in its service 
until it went out of business in 1890. But in the 
meantime, beginning in 1875, i" ^ small way, he 
engaged in raising cattle as a side line, gradually 
enlarging his operations and building up an in- 
creasing trade until for some years he has been 
one of the most extensive producers in that line 
in the state. His freighting experience was full 
of incident and adventure. It was never free from 
the element of danger, which adds spice to any 
occupation, and to a man of heroic temperament 
gives it great zest and attractiveness. For fifteen 
years his trips were made to the various towns and 



trading posts in the vast field covered by the 
operations of the Diamond R Company from Salt 
Lake to Fort Benton, and during that time the life 
of the freighter was a daily round of hardship and 
hazard. From 1879 to i8go he was in charge of 
the company's transportation contract with the 
government at Fort Assinniboine. This placed 
on his shoulders a weighty responsibility, but he 
discharged his duties in connection with it in a 
way that gave satisfaction to his employers and to 
all with whom they dealt. Since 1882 his stock 
operations have been in Choteau and Teton coun- 
ties, where he has large tracts of land, the home 
ranch being located two miles from Havre, on the 
north side of Milk river, and a model farm in all 
respects. Mr. Pepin located here before there 
was a town of Havre, or at least before it was 
anything more than a little country hamlet con- 
sisting of a few cabins. He has seen every stage 
of its growth to its present proportions, and can 
have the satisfaction of knowing that much of its 
development and prosperity is attributable to his 
own enterprise and foresight in establishing and 
pushing forward large business undertakings. He 
is senior partner in the Broadwater-Pepin Mer- 
cantile Company, of Havre and Browning; vice- 
president of the First National Bank of Havre, 
and owner of the Havre Hotel, one of the finest 
in the state, which he built in 1900. He also has 
large interests in other property and business 
throughout the city and country. He is a single 
man, and takes no interest in politics in a party 
sense, but has a deep and abiding concern for 
whatever militates in favor of the welfare of his 
section. 



PETER NORMANDIEN.— One of the pioneers 
of Montana who is highly esteemed in the com- 
munity where he has so long made his home, Peter 
Normandien is a prominent and successful farmer 
and stockgrower of the Deer Lodge valley, his fine 
ranch property being located five miles south of 
Deer Lodge, which is his postofiice address. Mr. 
Normandien comes of old French lineage, and was 
born in Montreal, Canada, on July 12, 1843, the son 
of Frank and Mary (King) Normandien, who were 
both natives of beautiful old Montreal. In 1849. 
at the time of the gold excitement in California, 
Frank Normandien journeyed to that state, where 
he was successfully identified with gold mining 
for seventeen years, though during the last year 





7^ 



p^^^v 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 185 



of his residence there he lost about $25,000 in 
speculation. In 1863 he came to Montana and lo- 
cated on Warm Spring creek, then in Deer Lodge 
county, where he took up land and remained one 
summer, then disposed of his interests and returned 
to JNIontreal for his family, with whom he soon re- 
turned to INIontana and located on Dempsey creek, 
in what is now Powell county. Here he engaged 
in farming and stockraising for a number of years, 
after which he retired from active business and took 
up his residence in the village of Deer Lodge until 
his death, which occurred in 1896, when he was 
seventy-six years of age. He was a man of fine 
Inisiness ability and indubitable honor, and held in 
high esteem. His widow survives him and now 
makes her home at Butte with her daughter, Mrs. 
Perron. 

Peter Xormandien passed his youth in his native 
city, and owing to the absence of his father in 
California and the somewhat straitened circum- 
stances of the family, his educational privileges 
were very limited, as it early became necessary for 
him to assist in the support of the family. At the 
age of eight }-ears he was employed in a Massachu- 
setts factory, and when only eleven he set forth 
for the long journey to jNIontana, becoming one of 
its youthful pioneers and making the trip entirely 
on his own responsibility. He took one of the 
Missouri river steamboats at St. Louis and came 
up the Mississippi and Missouri rivers to Fort 
r.enton. and then drove a bull team through to Deer 
Lodge, where he arrived in July, 1864, without a 
cent and dependent entirely upon his own resources. 
His fortitude and self-reliance stood him well in 
hand then, as in after years, and none can begrudge 
a success won against so great odds. ]\Ir. Nor- 
mandien soon secured work on a ranch, until the 
following spring, when he found employment in 
a mine on the Cottonwood river, receiving 
$6.00 per day for his services, this being the first 
appreciable wages he had ever received. He was 
a mere boy at the time, but before the summer had 
passed he was receiving $12 per day. His 
success did not "turn his head," for he saved his 
earnings, the vicissitudes through which he had 
passed and the responsibilities he had so early as- 
sumed, making him fully appreciative of the value 
of money. He was identified with mining for four 
years, and then, at the age of sixteen, took up a 
claim of 160 acres of land in what was then Deer 
Lodge county, five miles south of Deer Lodge vil- 
lage. .\ftcr the surveys were made he took up 



desert and pre-emption claims adjoining his original 
homestead, and, after the building of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad, which traverses his original place, 
he purchased railroad lands, and at the present time 
he has a finely improved ranch of 740 acres, most 
of which is rich bottom land, not dependent upon 
irrigation. 

Here Mr. Normandien has made his home from 
his early youth, and the appearance of his estate 
today, with its wide-stretching range of pasture, 
its modern improvements, its herds of excellent 
cattle and its air of prosperity, indicates what mav 
be accomplished by a boy who will work to definite 
ends and who appreciates the value of consecutive 
industry. Mr. Normandien has devoted special 
attention to the raising of cattle, and has a herd of 
about 300 head, while he also secures excellent crops 
from the cultivated portions of his ranch. From 
the beginning he has had the confidence and re- 
spect of the community, and is today recognized 
as one of the representative men of Deer Lodge 
valley. Mr. Normandien also owns a residence in 
the city of Deer Lodge, which is the winter home of 
the family, that the children may take advantage 
of the educational facilities afforded in the excel- 
lent public schools. In politics Mr. Normandien 
gives allegiance to the Democratic party, but while 
he takes a deep interest in the welfare of the county 
and state, he has had no desire for office. On De- 
cember 18, 1880, in his native city of ^Montreal, j\lr. 
Normandien was united in marriage to Miss Marie 
Beaurais, who was born in the same city, the daugh- 
ter of Casimir and Esther (Perron) Beaurais, 
both of French lineage. Her father was for many 
years a successful grocer in Montreal, where he 
now lives retired, his wife having passed away in 
1894. In Mr. and J\lrs. Normandien's family are 
eight children : Laura M., Clara G.. Oscar P.. 
Pacific A., Albert A.. Bertha A., Zelia A. and 
Marguerite H. 



ALEXANDER NORRIS, one of the oldest set- 
tlers of IMadison county, and practically the 
founder of the town that bears his name, has seen 
the growth of Montana from a wilderness and has 
contributed his share of the energy that has made 
the change. He was born in the good old Quaker 
city of Philadelphia, Pa.. October 10, 1840, a son 
of Samuel Norris, who emigrated from the north 
of Ireland as a young married man. and after liv- 



ii86 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



ing for a time in Philadelphia removed in 1850 to 
Wisconsin and engaged in farming until 1864. He 
then took up his residence in Iowa, where he ended 
his days. His wife, the mother of Alexander, died 
before he left Philadelphia. Mr. Norris passed his 
school days in Wisconsin, and in 1864, when Mon- 
tana was an almost unknown region, he came into 
its territories, driving an ox team across the plains 
for W. A. Fredericks, of whom mention is made 
elsewhere in this volume. He experienced no 
trouble with the Indians, and arrived at Alder 
gulch by way of Lander's cutoff on September 25, 
1864. After working there two or three weeks he 
went to Bozeman, and secured employment at the 
sawmill for which he had helped to haul the machin- 
ery across the plains. In February, 1865, he made a 
trip to Emigrant gulch, but soon returned to Boze- 
man, and afterward walked to Alder guicii \vhere 
he passed the summer mining. In the fall he 
removed to Sterling, and went to work for the Clark 
& Upson Mining ^ Company. Later he took up 
property near that place and engaged in ranching 
and stockraising. At different times he has located 
mines of value, among them being the Revenue. 
^^'hen the branch of the Northern Pacific, which 
touches at Norris, was run up to that point, the 
terminus was on Mr. Norris's place, and in his 
honor the town was named Norris. Here he has a 
ranch of some 1,200 acres, on which he is exten- 
sively engaged in raising assorted breeds of stock, 
with fine crops of hay and grain, and is a pleasant 
resort for his many friends. Throughout the com- 
munity Mr. Norris is highly esteemed and well 
spoken of. His extensive fund of reminiscences 
and his genial manner make him an entertaining- 
companion, and his liberal public spirit gives him an 
interest in whatever seems good for the neighbor- 
hood. He has another ranch at Gebo, near Bridger, 
and on the two he usually has several hundred 
head of cattle. He lives a quiet, peaceful life, doing 
his part for the welfare of his kind, and giving a 
good example to all who happen to come in con- 
tact with him. In politics he has always been a 
stanch Republican although not seeking political 
honors in any way. 



THOMAS NORTHY.— Among the sturdy sons 
of the Norseland who have become identified 
with the industrial life of Montana and attained 
success is Mr. Northy, a representative farmer and 



stockgrower of Carbon county and one of the hon- 
ored citizens of his community, 

Mr. Northy was born in Vermland, Sweden, 
January 29, 1865, a son of Andrew P. and Chris- 
tina (Johnson) Northy, natives of Vermland, 
Sweden. The mother passed away in 1878 and the 
father in 1879, having devoted his life to agri- 
cultural pursuits. Thomas remained in his native 
land until he attained the age of sixteen years, hav- 
ing received such educational advantages as were 
afforded by the local schools, and then severed the 
ties which bound him to his native land to seek his 
fortunes in America. He remained about two 
years in the state of New York, where he was em- 
ployed in the iron mines, coming then to Montana, 
where he found employment in April, 1863, with the 
construction force on the Northern Pacific Railroad 
between Bozeman and Helena. The severity of the 
work impaired his health and he sought other em- 
ployment. He finally located at Chestnut, Gallatin 
county, and assisted in opening up the coal mines 
in that vicinity, being thus engaged for a period of 
eighteen months. He then went to Timberline 
and engaged in opening the coal mines there, re- 
maining one year, going thence to Virginia City, 
and successfully engaged in placer and quartz min- 
ing for three years. Returning to Timberline his 
marriage was solemnized and with his wife re- 
moved to Elkhorn, Jefferson county, where he was 
identified with mining enterprises for two and a 
half years ; thence to Red Lodge, Carbon county, 
and engaged in general merchandise, with a branch 
store at Cokedale, Park county. He successfully 
continued operations in this line for three years, 
when he disposed of his mercantile interests and 
engaged in the sheep industry, locating on Dry 
creek, at a point eight miles north of the city of 
Red Lodge. This he continued for five years, when 
he turned his attention to the raising of cattle and 
general agriculture, in which he has been very 
successful. He now has a fine ranch of 160 acres, 
all under effective irrigation, his principal crops 
being clover and alfalfa, and securing large yields. 
He also here devotes considerable attention to the 
raising of grain. In the raising of cattle he gives 
preference to the Durham and Hereford types, and 
has a fine line of stock of each of these strains, 
usually feeding about 150 head. He is essentially 
progressive in his methods and is recognized as one 
of the enterprising farmers and stockgrowers of 
this section. He has made excellent improvements 
on his ranch, and has one of the attractive homes 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1187 



of this section. In politics Mr. Northy gives his 
allegiance to the Republican party; fraternally he 
is identified with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, retaining membership in Mountain Home 
Lodge No. 31, at Elkhorn. He commands the 
confidence and esteem of the community and is 
public-spirited in his attitude, taking a particularly 
deep interest in educational affairs. Upon the for- 
mation of what is known as the Northy school dis- 
trict he was chosen chairman of the board of school 
trustees, and still holds the position. 

At Timberline, Gallatin county, on the 3d of 
April, 1888, Mr. Northey was united in marriage to 
Miss Janet Watson, wfao was born in Pennsylvania, 
the daughter of Matthew Watson, of Scotch lin- 
eage and a native of the Keystone state. He was a 
resident of Timberline at the time of his daughter's 
marriage, but is now deceased, having died in Red 
Lodge, Mont., May 30, 1897. His widow is still 
living at the age of sixty-six years, making her 
home in Red Lodge, Mont. Mr. and ]\Irs. Northy 
have four children, namely : Emma C, Matthew A., 
Anna IM. and Wilhelmina. 



MORGAN J. NULLINER, although a young 
man, has achieved considerable prominence in 
Cascade county as an extensive and enterprising 
cattleraiser. He was born in Tipton county. Ind., 
October 22, 1872, the son of Frederick and Mary 
E. Nulliner, both of whom were born and reared 
in Indiana. Like his energetic son, the father was 
a successful stockgrower, though in the Hoosier 
state. Both of the parents were members of the 
Lutheran church. During his life he at all times 
manifested a lively interest in Democratic politics 
and was an influential worker within the party lines. 
The mother died in 1879 and the father in 1900. 
Five children survive them : Morgan J., Lewis, 
Harvey. Julia and Mary. Morgan J. Nulliner was 
deprived of the advantages of a liberal education, 
having been required at the age of eight years to 
assist his parents on the farm, and he remained 
with them until he attained his majority. It was 
then that he commenced the practical business of 
life for himself, removing west and settling in 
Beach county, Mo. For one year he found em- 
ployment as a teamster, and he then went to Kan- 
sas, but remained there only three months, coming 
to Montana on April 15, 1890, and locating on his 
present ranch near Geyser, twenty miles south- 



east of Belt. The property comprised, originally, 
a homestead claim of 160 acres, but to thi's Mr. 
Nulliner has added from time to time until he now 
has an extensive range of 2,000 acres, including 
leased lands. His attention is devoted entirely to 
cattle growing. He is a member of the United 
Brethren church, and politically is a Democrat. 



ORVILLE B. O'BANNON.— One of the pio- 
neer members of the Montana bar and one who 
has been conspicuous in Montana events since the 
early territorial epoch, is Judge O'Bannon, the 
nestor of the bar of Deer Lodge county, who has 
held positions of marked trust and responsibility, 
not only in a professional way but also in the gov- 
ernmental service. His experiences in the west 
have been wide and varied, and a review of his 
career must assuredly be given place in this work, 
though its essential limitations are such that ade- 
quate justice can not be done to one who has led 
so busy and useful a life. Orville Browning 
O'Bannon was born on November 23, 1833, at Fal- 
mouth, Pendleton county, Ky., the son of Elijah 
and Talitha Ann (Browning) O'Bannon, natives 
of Harrison and Mason counties, Ky. The original 
American ancestors in the agnatic line came from 
County Tipperary, Ireland, in early colonial days, 
and the O'Bannons are one of the oldest Irish fam- 
ilies in America. The maternal ancestory of Judge 
O'Bannon traces back to stanch English and Welsh 
stock, the grandparents on either side having been 
born in Virginia, whence they accompanied their 
respective parents to Kentucky as pioneers. Elijah 
O'Bannon .was the first sheriff elected in Fayette 
county, Ky., where he died in 185 1, having been 
a farmer and trader by occupation. His wife sur- 
vived him about thirteen years. They became the 
parents of two sons and five daughters. The only 
surviving son, Orville B., was the eldest of the 
family, a sister and a brother having died in child- 
hood, while of the others two yet survive. 

Orville B. O'Bannon was seven years of age 
at the time of his parents' removal to Fayette 
county, Ky., in which county he was reared and 
educated, with the exception of one year passed 
with his uncle at Ouincy, 111. He attended private 
schools and an academy in Lexington, and com- 
pleted a literary course in the Transylvania L^ni- 
versity, the famous old educational institution of 
that quaint and beautiful little city. Mr. O'Bannon 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



put his scholastic requirements to a practical test 
by eii|;aging in pedagogic work for about a year 
after the completion of his literary course, and in 
the meanwhile he had determined to prepare him- 
self for the legal profession. He accordingly 
matriculated in the law department of his alma 
mater, the Transylvania University, where he was 
graduated on February 29, 1856. At that time the 
law and medical departments of that institution 
unmistakably held higher prestige than those of 
any other institution of the kind in the western 
states, while the precedence of the university at 
the present day is not of secondary order. Within 
the month succeeding his graduation Mr. O'Bannon 
went to Keokuk, Iowa, where he engaged in active 
legal practice until June, 1858. when he removed 
to Burlington, and continued his professional labors 
there until 1861. when, in April, he started with an 
ox train on the long and then perilous overland 
trip to California. Reaching the territory of Nevada 
in August, he left the train and stopped at the 
Humboldt mines, in what is now the county of 
that name, and there engaged in prospecting and 
mining for about four years. 

In April, 1866, he joined an exploring expedi- 
tion in the interests of the Central Pacific Railroad, 
and for nearly a year was engaged in exploration 
work in the engineering department. He had fa- 
miliarized himself with the language of the Sho- 
shone Indians, and proved an exceptionally valu- 
able member of the expedition party, whose work 
was principally in Nevada and Utah. Finally Air. 
O'Bannon went to San Francisco, and was in the 
employ of the government in engineering work 
at Point Labos, Cal., until May, 1867, when the 
land office was established at Helena, Mont., and 
he received the appointment of register, coming to 
the present capital of the state as the first incum- 
bent of this important office on June 8, 1867. He 
continued in the office of register until July, 1869, 
when he received an appointment as clerk of the 
district court of the Second judicial district of the 
territory of Montana, which comprised Deer Lodge, 
Missoula and Beaverhead counties. He retained 
this office until May, 1879, practically a full dec- 
ade, and then resigned it to resume legal practice 
in Deer Lodge, where he has ever since continued, 
giving particular attention to land cases, in which 
branch of legal work his long connection with land 
matters make him a potent factor, while his judg- 
ment therein is essentially authoritative. 

From the first he has retained a representative 



clientage, and as a counsel and an attorney no 
member of the bar of the county has gained more 
distinguished prestige. He has ever manifested a 
lively interest in public affairs and has been a zeal- 
ous worker in the Republican party. In 1875 he 
was the candidate of his party for the office of pro- 
bate judge of Deer Lodge county, which then in- 
cluded all the territory now comprised in Deer 
Lodge, Powell, Silver Bow, Granite counties and 
most of Teton county and portions of Flathead and 
Lewis and Clarke counties. He was elected to this 
office by a majority of eighty-eight votes, being 
the only Republican elected at that time. He held 
the office for a term of thr§e years, within which 
time he entered townsites and executed deeds for 
the city of Butte and the town of Philipsburg, the 
former being now the metropolis of the state. For 
more than twenty-seven years Judge O'Bannon held 
the office of United States commissioner, resign- 
ing in 1897. On August 7, 1883, Judge O'Bannon 
was united in marriage to Miss Fannie C. Irvine, 
born in Buchanan county. Mo., the daughter of 
William L. Irvine, a native of Kentucky, who 
eventually became a resident of Deer Lodge, where 
his death occurred. To Judge and Mrs. O'Bannon 
six children were born, of whom four are now liv- 
ing, Ida B., wife of Morton S. Railey, of Kentucky, 
Anna P., Marv B. and Eliza P. 



FATHER FRANCIS O'FARRELL, now of 
Townsend, Mont., was born in Woodford, 
County Galway, Ireland, in May, 1869. He is a 
son of Francis O'Farrell, a farmer, whose fore- 
fathers had lived in that famous county for many 
generations. His early education was received in 
Woodford, where he demonstrated such a capacity 
for acquiring knowledge that he was given a classi- 
cal course in St. Mary's College, conducted by the 
Mariot Fathers, at Dundalk. (The Mariot Fathers 
also conduct a college at Salt Lake City, Utah.) 
In 1893 young Francis decided to enter the priest- 
hood and in preparation therefor entered St. Pat- 
rick's College at Carlow, where he remained five 
years and finished his philosophical and theological 
studies. Father O'Farrell then received an invita- 
tion from the president of Notre Dame to go to 
Montreal as professor of English in that eminent 
university. He accepted and there passed two years 
of useful service as a successful teacher, not only 
of the English language but of mathematics as 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



1 189 



well. Following this he was ordained for the dio- 
cese of Montana August 12, 1899, by Archbishop 
Bruchesi, of Montreal. Then, after a month's va- 
cation, in which he visited friends in New York and 
Chicago, Father O'Farrell arrived in Montana, and 
was appointed assistant at the cathedral by Bishop 
Brondell, having a general supervision of the in- 
terests of the Catholic church in Jefferson, Broad- 
water and Meagher counties. The faithful zeal and 
indefatigable industry which he manifested in that 
service caused his appointment on August i, 1900 
to care for the societies and missions of Broad- 
water county, being the first priest appointed to that 
district. 



TOHN H. OWINGS, M. D.— Devoted to the 
J noble and humane work which his profession 
implies. Dr. Owings has proved a faithful exemplar 
of the healing art, and has not only earned the 
due reward of his efforts in a temporal way, but 
has proven himself worthy to exercise the im- 
portant functions of his calling through his ability, 
his abiding sympathy and his earnest zeal in behalf 
of his fellowmen. His understanding of the science 
of medicine is broad and comprehensive and the 
profession and public accord him an honored place 
among the medical practitioners of Montana, while 
he is also known as one of the representative 
citizens and business men of the city of Deer 
Lodge, where he has been an established physician 
and surgeon for two decades. John Hood Owings 
was born in Howard county, Md., on October 19, 
1 841, the son of John H. and Amanda C. (Boyle) 
Owings, who were natives of that state and repre- 
sentatives of prominent old families. John H. 
Owings, Sr., was a physician of fine ability and was 
in active practice in Howard county for more than 
forty years. He was a stepson of Dr. Samuel K. 
Jennings, president of Washington Medical School 
in Baltimore and one of the eminent medical men 
of that state: and he also had a brother who was 
a physician. The maternal grandfather of Dr. 
Owings of this review was a privateer in the war 
of 181 2 and attained no little distinction for his 
shrewdness, skill and daring in this service. 

Dr. John H. Owings, of Deer Lodge, was reared 
in his native county, receiving an academic edu- 
cation and thereafter turning his attention to the 
study of medicine and surgery, under the dis- 
criminating and efficient direction of his father and 
older brother, giving inception to this work of 



technical training in 1859. Later he matriculated 
in the medical department of the LTniversity of 
Maryland, this being the fourth oldest medical 
school in the United States, and he was there grad- 
uated with the class of 1861, at the age of twenty. 
The following years he took a post-graduate course 
of lectures in the same institution and then was 
for about two years associated in practice with his 
father and brother, his original preceptors, in the 
meantime keeping up his studies and investiga- 
tions. In the crucial period immediately preceding 
the Civil war, and after the conflict had been in- 
stituted. Dr. Owings was in sympathy with the 
south, and it was only through the influence of 
his parents that he relinquished engaging in the 
Confederate service. He was present at Harper's 
Ferry and witnessed the capture of John Brown. 
He continued in medical practice in Maryland and 
western Pennsylvania until 1873, when he removed 
to Colorado, where he remained about three and 
one-half years, after which he went to the Black 
Hills, where he was in practice until 1881, when 
he came to Deer Lodge, where he has since re- 
tained a representative support, controlling a large 
business in his profession, his skill and discrimina- 
tion being not less popularly appreciated than his 
unfailing courtesy and sympathy. In 1885 the 
Doctor became identified with the drug business 
in Deer Lodge, conducting a well equipped estab- 
lishment for one year under the firm name of J. 
H. Eastman & Co. Mr. Eastman then retiring. 
Dr. Owings has since individually conducted the 
enterprise. He is essentially a student, and keeps 
fully abreast of the advances made in medicine 
and surgery, while he devotes much time to orig- 
inal research and investigation. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Association, the Na- 
tional Association of Railway Surgeons and is 
ex-president of the Montana State jMedical Society. 
The Doctor has been for the past seventeen years 
local surgeon for the Northern Pacific Railroad, 
and was physician to the United States penitentiary 
in Deer Lodge from 1889 until it was made a state 
institution, and was thereafter retained in the same 
capacity for four years. He has been attending 
physician at St. Mary's Academy from its estab- 
lishment, was county physician of Deer Lodge 
county on several different occasions, and is now 
serving in that capacity for Powell county. 

Dr. Owings has always taken a lively interest in 
political affairs as a true Jeffersonian Democrat, 
contributing in every possible way to the advance- 



iigo 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



ment of the party cause, serving as delegate to 
various county and state conventions, but never 
seeking political honors or emoluments. In all 
that touches the advancement and material pros- 
perity of the city of his home he has shown a 
public-spirited concern, and he has been called 
upon to serve as a member of the city council, 
where he labored earnestly to insure a wise ad- 
ministration of municipal attairs. Fraternally he 
is prominently identified with the Knights of 
Pythias, being at the present time grand prelate 
of the grand lodge of the state, while he is sur- 
geon of the First Montana Regiment of the Uni- 
form Rank of the order, with the rank of major. He 
identified himself with this fraternity in 1866, and 
has had an abiding interest in its work. Since 1883 
he has also been connected with the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, in which organization he has 
been repeatedly elected medical examiner. Dr. 
Owings has been twice married. On March 13, 
1863, he wedded Amanda E. Wickert, and they 
were the parents of four daughters, Minna G., 
Amanda E., Stella I. and Ida R., all of whom re- 
side in the east. On August 18, 1875, the Doctor 
consummated a second marriage, being then united 
to Miss Susan M. Butcher, of Boulder, Colo., she 
being a native of Kentucky, and of this union two 
daughters have been born, Vonnie and Marguerite. 
The elder daughter has shown marked talent as 
an artist in oils and water colors and has acquired 
reputation throughout the state, having given in- 
structions in these lines of art various state in- 
stitutes. She is now in Chicago, where she is a 
student in the Art Institute. 



pHARLES F. OLGARDT, who with his father 
v^ conducts a profitable stock ranch in Cascade 
county, first came to Great Falls in 1889. He was 
born at Stapleton, Staten Island, N. Y., on Decem- 
ber 2, 1872, the son of Henry J. and Margaret 
(Lange) Olgardt. The mother was born in Bre- 
men, Germany, which city she left in 1859, coming 
to Staten Island where she remained until 1867, 
when she made her home at Sun river, and remained 
there until her death which occurred on March 17, 
1887. The father, Henry J. Olgardt, first left 
Germany in 1855 as a small boy, and came to 
New York. He returned to that country in 1862 
and remained there until 1866, following the trade 
of a carpenter. In 1876 he joined the Third 



United States Infantry as a musician, and in 1882 
was mustered out at Fort Shaw, his term hav- 
ing expired. He took up a homestead claim on 
Sun river, which he improved and on it raised 
cattle, remaining there until 1889, when he re- 
moved to Great Falls. Here he engaged in car- 
penter work until 1896. In 1890 he married Miss 
Anna, of Franklin county, Mass., and the daugh- 
ter of Neill and Ellen O'Kane, who had come from 
Ireland at an early day. Her father was a stone- 
mason, and died at Roseman, Christian county, 
111., in 1865. Her mother died at Aspen, Colo., in 
1896. Charles F. Olgardt took up a homestead 
claim in Boston coulee. Cascade county, cultivated 
forty acres of the land, and utilized the rest for 
pasturage for cattle and horses. He has twenty- 
four head of cattle and six horses. His father took 
up a desert claim of 200 acres, all of which is 
improved. Charles F. Olgardt is the only living 
child, his sister Minnie being dead. He considers 
that he has been very prosperous since his arrival 
in Montana. 



HENRY S. PAGE.— Is is safe to say that no man 
in Ravalli county is better known or more 
highly esteemed than Henry S. Page, proprietor of 
the Hamilton hotel, which he conducts in such a 
way as to gain the patronage and good will of a 
discriminating public, being well deserving of the 
title of "mine host." He purchased the first lot in 
the townsite of the thriving little city of Hamilton, 
and has contributed in a large measure to the de- 
velopment of this section and the material prosper- 
ity of his home town. 

Mr. Page is a native of Belmont, Allegany 
county, N. Y., born on May 27, 1842, the eldest 
of the six children of Lewis and Deborah Page, 
both of them natives of Vermont. The early educa- 
tional advantages of Henry S. Page were afforded 
by a somewhat irregular attendance in the excellent 
schools of Friendship, N. Y., since he there pur- 
sued his studies during the winter months only, 
while he assisted on the parental farmstead in the 
summer. He was but eighteen years of age when 
came the Civil war, but he enlisted in 1861 as a 
private of Company I, Eighty-fifth New York In- 
fantry, with which he was in active service until 
May, 1863, and corporal of his company when he 
was captured and sent to the notorious prison at 
Andersonville. He was at Charleston at the time of 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



its bombardment, and he was in service for four 
years, including the time he was in prison. He was 
at home on a furlough when President Lincoln was 
assassinated, and there received his honorable dis- 
charge. 

Mr. Page remained in New York until 1866 
when he was engaged in farming in Madison 
county. Wis., for nearly a decade. He then re- 
moved to Worth county, Iowa, and continued in 
agricultural pursuits two years, and disposed of his 
Iowa interests and came westward to Fargo, N. D., 
where he was employed in a wholesale machine and 
implement house, being in the warehouse part of 
the time and the rest of the time on the road as 
a traveling representative of the firm. He had 
owned a farm near Oneida, S. D., for some time, 
and finally took up his residence there and engaged 
in farming for two years. He then disposed of the 
property and came to Montana, first locating near 
Corvallis, Ravalli county, where he devoted his at- 
tention to farming for about three years, and then 
came to Hamilton, and, as before stated, bought 
the first lot sold in the town. He forthwith began 
the erection of the Hamilton hotel, a wooden struc- 
ture, and thereafter conducted it most successfully, 
in connection with a livery and blacksmithing bus- 
iness, until August, 1900, when all three of his 
buildings were burned, entailing a loss of more than 
$30,000, with practically no insurance. 

The ashes of his burned hotel were scarcely cold 
ere Mr. Page began the erection of his present at- 
tractive and substantial brick hotel, which is com- 
modious, secure and equipped with modern im- 
provements. He is thus able to give the best of ac- 
commodations to his guests and his place is a favor- 
ite resort of the traveling public. The cuisine is 
exceptionally attractive, since Mr. Page has a nice 
ranch, located only two miles from the town, and 
from this secures the greater portion of the sup- 
plies for his table, thus insuring fresh and palat- 
able food. In politics he gives an active support to 
the Republican party, and fraternally he is identi- 
fied with the Grand Army of the Republic. On 
April 3, 1871, at Madison, Wis., Mr. Page was 
united in marriage to Miss Adelphia Squires, a 
daughter of Ezra and Marretta Squires, pioneers 
of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Page are the parents of 
two daughters, Nellie, wife of W. O. Fisk, who is 
clerk in the Hamilton hotel, and Maude, the wife 
of Edward Smith, who is connected with the hard- 
ware department of the Anaconda Copper Mining 
Company in Hamilton. 



ROBERT A. PAMENTER.— The subject of this 
sketch merits recognition as one of the progres- 
sive young men of Fergus county, where he has re- 
sided for the past decade. Mr. Pamenter is a na- 
tive of Canada, having been born in the town of 
Stratford, in the county of Perth, on the 17th of 
November, 1873, the son of Richard and Eliza Pa- 
menter, who were born in England, whence they 
emigrated to Canada in i860, where they still main- 
tain their home. In his earlier years Richard Pa- 
menter was a baker, and by his earnings at this 
trade he paid his passage to America on a sailing 
vessel, which occupied three months in the trip. 
Both he and his wife are communicants of the 
Church of England. Three of their thirteen chil- 
dren are deceased, the others being George, 
Charles, Lizzie, Harriet, Mary, Annie, Allen, Sam- 
uel and John. One child died in infancy and the 
other two who have passed away are Eliza and 
Richard. 

Robert A. Pamenter at the age of eighteen years 
began to assist his father in the bakery business, 
continuing in this line until 1890, when he became 
a fireman in the biscuit factory at Hamilton, Can- 
ada, for two years. Then he determined to seek his 
fortune in Montana. He was ambitious to make a 
place for himself and to win success by legitimate 
effort, by energy, industry and honesty of purpose, 
and decided that Montana was the place for this. He 
came to JVIontana in 1892, arriving at Belt on x\pril 
10, and then walked sixty-five miles to Utica. He 
found himself there a stranger in a strange com- 
munity, while his cash capital was thirteen cents. 
He soon found work on the ranch of J. C. Huntoon, 
receiving $50 per month as wages. He continued 
at this work for several years. He was industrious 
and economical and saved enough money to pur- 
chase his present ranch in 1898. This comprises 
155 acres and is located one and one-half miles 
southwest of Utica. He paid $1,300 for 
the property, and here he has since been 
successfully engaged in market gardening, raising 
vegetables on an extensive scale and finding a ready 
market for them. It is gratifying to note the suc- 
cess which has attended his efforts, for it demon- 
strates what reward Montana will give to industry 
and thrift. In politics he adheres to the Republi- 
can party and his religious faith is that of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal church, of which both he and his 
wife are communicants. 

On the 22d of December, 1897, Mr. Pamenter 
was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth M. Arm- 



192 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



strong, who was born in Toronto, Canada, the 
daughter of William and Elizabeth Armstronp-, both 
of whom were born in the dominion, the former 
still retaining his residence in Toronto and both 
being members of the Church of England. Mrs. 
Armstrong passing from earth on the ist of Oc- 
tober, 1887, leaving three children, Minnie, John 
and Elizabeth. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Pamenter have two 
children, Richard A. and Elizabeth M. 



ISAAC ROE. — It has been said, and more or less 
truthfully, that steam has robbed the sea of 
much of the hazard incurred bj; men who went 
"down to the sea in ships" when only sailing ves- 
sels were known ; when from the hour of embarka- 
tion to that of safe anchorage in the final harbor 
the element of uncertainty was ever present and 
hope and fear were alternate masters, the ship be- 
ing the sport of every wind and wave. This has 
strong proof in the experience of Isaac Roe, the 
subject of this narrative, who spent thirty-eight 
days of uncertainty in a sailing vessel on the 
stormy Atlantic before reaching the land of hope 
and promise to which he voyaged from his native 
Lincolnshire, England, where he was born No- 
vember I, 1835. He received the usual scholastic 
training apportioned to boys of his class in Eng- 
land at the time, and after leaving school worked 
on a farm for a number of years, drifting then into 
business as a coal merchant, which he continued 
to be for some time. In 1858 he came to the 
United States, landing at New York, whence he 
traveled by easy stages to Grinnell, Iowa, and re- 
mained three years. In 1861 he made the trip 
across the plains to Colorado with an ox team, 
and after his arrival engaged in freighting between 
Denver and Central City until 1863. In that year 
he loaded his wagons with merchandise and came 
to Montana, arriving in July at Bannack, where 
he sold out his entire outfit, goods, oxen and 
wagons, at high prices. In January following he 
and a Mr. Coppersmith started back to Iowa by 
way of Salt Lake City, Denver and Omaha, leav- 
ing Bannack on horseback, with pack horses at- 
tached. The snow was deep and the weather bit- 
ter cold, the thermometer being 40 degrees below 
zero. On the way food gave out, and they nearly 
starved as well as froze before reaching the Mor- 
mon settlements, where they recuperated some- 



what, and then took a stage for Denver. At that 
place they were detained on account of the hos- 
tility of the Indians until an escort of United 
States troops could be furnished. At more than 
one stage station they found nothing but smould- 
ering ruins and dead bodies of whites and Indians, 
some of which had been partially consumed by the 
fire into which they had been thrown. It was a 
time of great hardship and privation. The snow 
was deep and the weather bitter cold, and provis- 
ions were scarce, it being difficult to get food for 
either man or beast. When our subject reached 
Omaha, on March 10, he found the Missouri 
frozen over and further progress blocked. But 
one man who had traveled on the stage with Mr. 
Roe was so eager to go forward and reach his 
home in Iowa that, against the protest of all pres- 
ent, he started to cross the river on the ice, taking 
a long pole with him for aid and protection. 
When he was in midstream the ice gave way and 
he went down, never again to be seen by human 
eyes. For some time he kept punching the pole 
through the ice, showing that he kept the use of 
his faculties, but finally was exhausted, and sank 
to rise no more. 

After waiting eight days for the ice to break 
up Mr. Roe crossed the river and proceeded to his 
destination at Grinnell, Iowa. There he imme- 
diately began outfitting for his return trip to Ban- 
nack, and not considering his outfit complete on 
this occasion without a wife, he was married to 
Miss Martha Freeman, of Grinnell, and, after 
completing his arrangements, they started on the 
long and hazardous journey with wagon loads of 
merchandise drawn by oxen. Nothing of note 
occurred until they were well up the Platte river, 
where Mr. Roe was arrested as a southern sympa- 
thizer, the arrest resulting from a casual remark. 
Indians had attacked two government wagons, 
killing the sergeant and running off the mules. 
That night a stranger came into the camp and, 
addressing our subject, who was captain of the ' 
train, deplored the death of the sergeant, but more 
particularly the loss of the mules. Our subject 
replied that the death of the sergeant was very 
sad, but he did feel particularly sorry on account 
of the mules. For this remark he was arrested 
and taken back fifty miles, without knowing the 
cause, and made to carry a sack of sand from one 
given point to another, back and forth, for two 
days, and was released only by reason of the for- 
tunate arrival of a former acquaintance who 




ISAAC ROE 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



[193 



vouched for his loyalty. He was then turned 
loose without provisions, alone, on foot, in a coun- 
try full of hostile Indians and 100 miles behind his 
wagons. At the time of his arrest he had left in- 
structions for the train to keep on traveling, and 
he would overtake them. After seven days of 
great hardship and many narrow escapes from 
danger, he caught up with the train and found the 
people in it greatly rejoiced over the safe return 
of their captain. He had no further mishap, and 
in August arrived at Bannack, where he at once 
proceeded to sell out his merchandise. Leaving 
his wife there, he started again for Grinnell, trav- 
eling this time by stage coach, and on arrival 
bought cattle, wagons and merchandise for another 
trip. He started in April, 1865, again being 
elected captain of the train, and taking every pre- 
caution to protect his company from attacks by 
the Indians, who were very bad that summer. On 
one occasion, after the Indians left a train in front 
of him which they had attacked, his train drove 
to the place and found the dead bodies of two men 
and one young lady, the savages having broken 
every joint of the young lady's body, even those of 
her fingers and toes. Grass was very scarce that 
season and travel was slow. But without further 
incident the train reached Bannack in August, 
having been on the way since April. In partner- 
ship with his brother Mr. Roe opened a store and 
began selling out the goods just brought in. He 
continued in this store three years, and then sold 
out his interest and engaged in butchering, min- 
ing, banking and dealing in gold dust. This he 
continued until his death, which occurred Novem- 
ber 18, 1873. He left surviving him a widow and 
two children — a son and daughter. 

Mr. Roe was a fine example of the sterling man- 
hood which settled the great northwest, exhibiting 
in his active and fruitful career ever_v manly virtue 
and quality of heroic endurance. He was without 
much book learning, but was endowed by nature 
with wonderful talents ; had fine business qualifica- 
tions and was a man of the most unyielding integ- 
rity. In his private life he was a noble exemplar 
of all the virtues — a faithful and loving husband, 
an indulgent but judicious and far-seeing father, 
and a wise, firm and constant friend. His exam- 
ple was full of inspiration to the young, his coun- 
sel was full of wisdom for the more mature, and 
his life was full of helpfulness and usefulness to all 
who came within the sphere of his activities or 
demanded assistance from lawful reasons. 



A NDREW E. PARKER.— The eighth of the 
■LV eleven children of Charles J. and Elizabeth 
(Hedges) Parker, of Oxford, England, Andrew 
E. Parker was born in Kane county. 111., Novem- 
ber 30, 1848, four months after the arrival of his 
parents in America. They arrived in July of that 
year and settled in Kane county, where the father 
worked at his trade as a mason for nineteen years. 
He then removed to Minnesota, locating in Stearns 
county, where the family were pioneers and where 
they engaged in farming and raising stock. Andrew 
received his education in the public schools of Illi- 
nois, and remained at home until April, 1863, when 
he enlisted in the Union army, as a member of 
Company F, Seventh Iowa Cavalry, under Col. 
Summers. He was mustered in at Davenport, 
Iowa, and after three months passed there the regi- 
ment was ordered to Nebraska and stationed at Cot- 
tonwood Springs, where it wintered, building a post 
for the purpose. It had numerous skirmishes with 
the Indians, and in the spring was removed to Fort 
Laramie, Wyo., where the troops passed the sum- 
mer engaged in scouting. In the autumn they re- 
turned to the South Platte, built quarters and win- 
tered at Julesburg, their buildings being the begin- 
ning of what was afterward Fort Sedgwick. Here 
they saw active and dangerous service, for the In- 
dians were hostile and in force. On the morning of 
February i, 1865, leaving a few invalids to guard 
the post, thirty-seven men followed a band of sav- 
ages some seven miles into what is called the 
Devil's dives, with Mr. Parker, a sergeant and three 
men as an advance guard. They took a side trail 
around a horseshoe bend, and upon reaching a 
knoll they discovered that the hollow was full of 
Indians. The sergeant at once ordered a retreat 
to the company, but it was difficult for them to 
get back, as the company was continually changing 
its position, making a stand against the Indians, then 
falling back. On the way the sergeant and the 
other three men were killed, but ]\Ir. Parker reached 
the company in safety. After getting to level 
ground the Indians broke ofif to each flank and at- 
tempted to take the fort, which was defended by a 
few invalids, but they succeeded in holding it until 
the arrival of the company, using in their defense 
two howitzers which -were at the post. After a 
day's siege the Indians disappeared ; but on the 25th 
of February they again attacked the post, and held 
it in siege for nine days. On the seventh day one 
of the soldiers succeeded in getting through the 
lines and carried a message to Alkali station, al- 



1 194 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



though chased eighteen miles by the Indians. This 
brought 400 soldiers to the relief of the post and 
on their arrival the Indians again disappeared, but 
the troops followed them as far north as Mud 
Springs, and relieved Col. Collins, virho with 350 
men was corralled about 125 miles from this post. 
The savages were dispersed and many of them 
killed. Three white women who had been in cap- 
tivity and were released reported that the Indian 
warriors numbered over 600, and were determined 
to exterminate the whites. In the engagement of 
February i sixteen of the thirty-seven men engaged 
were killed, and in subsequent engagements the 
mortality was considerable on both sides. On May 
I Gen. Connor from California took command of 
the division and removed Mr. Parker's regiment to 
Fort Laramie, where they remained nearly two 
months, then started down Poudre river and es- 
tablished Fort Reno. They moved their supplies 
down Tongue river, having an engagement on the 
way in which they killed thirty-seven Indians, all 
there were in the party. On the second day 200 
men were detailed to retrace their march and clear 
the country of hostile Indians. At Goose creek they 
had a fight with the Arapahoes, killed 167 of them, 
captured 672 of their ponies and burned their tepees. 
Returning to their command on Tongue river they 
moved down near the mouth of Tongue river, there 
awaited the arrival of a command coming up the 
Yellowstone to join our forces, but owing to the 
loss of their horses they failed to connect with this 
command and returned to Fort Reno. From there 
they went to Fort Laramie, where they wintered, 
having an occasional brush with the Indians. On 
February 28, 1866, some newly enlisted Mexicans, 
with the help of outsiders, stole a number of gov- 
ernment horses and mules and made ofiE with them. 
Mr. Parker was in the party detailed to go after 
them, but the Mexicans having relays of horses 
got away. On May 17, 1866, he was honorably 
discharged from the service, his time having ex- 
pired. Two of his brothers also saw active and ar- 
duous service in the Union arm-y. They were John 
Charles and Henry James. The former was in the 
service four years and four months, and rose to 
the rank of first lieutenant. Henry J. was in active 
service eighteen months, then relieved from active 
service on account of disability, but did duty as a 
hospital steward until the close of the war. At the 
end of his military service Mr. Parker took up his 
residence in Minnesota, where he passed twelve 
years farming and freighting. A part of the twelve 



years wes spent freighting from Fort Teton to Fort 
Stevenson, Dak. In 1878 he removed to North 
Dakota and engaged in freighting from Bismarck 
to the Black Hills. After conducting this enter- 
prise two years he was employed in the con- 
struction of the Northern Pacific Railroad, working 
on the line through to Billings. He located on the 
Yellowstone at what is known as Rapids station 
on the Northern Pacific Railroad and occupied him- 
self with raising stock on the ranch then selected 
until 1894. In that year he removed to his present 
property two and three-quarter miles due south of 
Bridger, Carbon county, where he has a fine modern 
residence, a body of excellent land and a herd of 
200 Hereford and Durham cattle. His land is well 
irrigated and improved with all necessary buildings 
and other appliances, and produces large crops of 
alfalfa and timothy. 

Mr. Parker was united in marriage on April 26, 
1 87 1, with Miss Anna Stiles, of New York, a 
sister of Theodore Stiles, of Gallatin valley, of 
whom extended mention is made on another page of 
this work. They have nine children : Edith, wife of 
C. A. Whitlock, of Clark's Forks; Walter S., lo- 
cated on Clark's Fork; Edna, Frank, Harry, Maud 
and Amy attending college at Lincoln, Neb. ; Mabel, 
wife of Leo Smith, of Stillwater, Mont.; and 
Charles, living at home. Mr. Parker is a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Ma- 
sonic order. He formerly belonged to the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a repre- 
sentative citizen of the best type and is highly es- 
teemed wherever he is known. 



pHAUNCEY DE WITT PARKER, named in 
V^ honor of Gov. De Witt Clinton, of New York, 
an old time friend of the family, is recognized as 
one of the leading ranchers of Sweet Grass county, 
his valuable property lying in the vicinity of Big 
Timber, Mont. He was born in Arcade, Wyoming 
county, N. Y., on December 30, 1868, one of seven 
sons and four daughters. His father, John Parker, 
also a native of Wyoming county, born on Janu- 
ary 20, 1831, while his mother, AdeHa M. (Keller) 
Parker, was born in the beautiful and romantic 
Mohawk valley. The paternal grandfather, Silas 
Parker, was a native of New York. John Parker 
was a soldier during the Civil war, fought gallantly 
and suffered untold miseries in the southern pris- 
ons of Bird Island, Lawton, Libby and Ander- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



195 



sonville. He first enlisted in Company C, One 
Hundred and Thirty-fifth New York, remained 
with the command one year and was transferred 
to the First New Yoric Dragoons; served two 
years and was taken prisoner at the battle of the 
Wilderness. When Mr. Parker enlisted he weighed 
184 pounds, and when exchanged from Anderson- 
ville he was reduced to ninety-six pounds and had 
lost his teeth and hair. In 1875 he removed to 
Minnesota with his family, where he remained until 
his death, which occurred from a kick by one of his 
horses in February, 1901. 

The excellent public schools of Minnesota pro- 
vided the early education of C. D. Parker, and he 
continued industriously at work on his father's 
farm until he was eighteen years of age, when 
he came to Montana, first to Great Cliff, where he 
engaged in ranching. He then sought the Boulder 
mines, prospected for two summers and went to 
work for the Briggs & Ellis Company, at Big 
Timber, as foreman. During his eighteen-months 
service with that company he engaged in all kinds 
of ranch work, breaking fractious bronchos, on 
the "round-up" and similar occupations, making 
a thorough study of the details. His present prop- 
erty, lying on Big Timber creek, he purchased in 
1898, since which time he has extensively engaged 
in the sheep and cattle industries. He has 280 acres, 
well irrigated, from which he gathers large and 
profitable crops of alfalfa. Last year he killed fifty- 
nine hogs and intends to engage more prominently 
in that enterprise. His favorite stock appears to 
be Percheron horses, shorthorn cattle and Merino 
sheep crossed with Shropshires. Through the 
ranch courses Big Timber creek. Mr. Parker was 
married on December 29, 1897, to Miss Dora Ald- 
ridge, of Big Timber. They have one child, John 
Ray, born August 13, 1900. As a man he is greatly 
respected and evidently he is on the high road to 



GEORGE A. PARROTT.— Forty years of life 
in the west should surely confer upon one the 
title of "old timer." During this long period 
how much of excitement and wild experiences must 
have been passed through, how much endurance 
demanded to withstand the hardships and depri- 
vations incident of the life of the early pioneer. 
For over forty years has George A. Parrott, one of 
the prosperous citizens of Lewistown, Mont., been 
identified with the growth of the great west since 



his arrival at San Francisco in the fall of i860. 
He was born at Lenoxton, Addington, in the prov- 
ince of Ontario, Canada, on January 28, 1838, the 
son of James and Elizabeth J. (Babcock) Parrott. 
The Parrott family for long generations has flour- 
ished in England, a branch, however, early taking 
root in Canada. James Parrott was born and lived 
his long and active life in Addington, held fre- 
quently responsible offices and was at one time the 
treasurer of the province. A brother of his was 
for long years the treasurer of the county of his 
birth. Both of Mr. Parrott's paternal and maternal 
ancestors fought on the British side in the Revo- 
lution and the war of 181 2. His great-grandfather, 
John Snider, was born in Germany, and for emi- 
nent services in the English army was granted 
large concessions of land in Ontario, and thereafter 
made his home in that province. He had seven- 
teen children and numerous grandchildren, and 
lived to the patriarchal age of over ninety years. 
The mother of Mr. Parrott died in October, 1838, 
and he was brought up by his mother's parents 
and never was a resident member of his father's 
household. 

In the forest settlement of the pioneer district 
where Mr. Parrott was born there was little op- 
portunity to acquire even the rudimentary branches 
of education and he had no other chance to at- 
tend school. Up to his twentieth year he was en- 
gaged in laboring on the farm and in learning and 
working at the blacksmith's trade in Canada and 
New York, acquiring skill and making carriage 
ironing a specialty. He was not content to plod 
along in the overcrowded and underpaid ranks of 
his fellow workers of the east and set his face 
toward the far west, sailing in September, i860, 
from New York for California, via the Isthmus of 
Panama. He arrived in San Francisco in Novem- 
ber, and after passing a few weeks there went to 
Sonoma City, and secured work at his trade, re- 
ceiving $40 per month and board. The next March 
he started for Nevada, his route leading him by 
way of Sacramento City and by rail from there 
to Folsom, the end of the railroad. From Folsom 
he went on foot with others to Sugar Loaf Station, 
Cal., where he did good business that summer in 
blacksmithing for the numerous freighters who 
passed along the well traveled highway. Here he 
experienced in the wmter of 1861-2 one of the 
most thrilling episodes of his life. A three-months 
rain loosened the 'mountain side, and a landslide 
of wonderful size nearly s\yept away the little set- 



196 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



tlement in the narrow valley and clammed up the 
stream flowing through it so that the lake of water 
which was formed almost completed the destruction 
commenced by the slide. Although many cattle 
were killed and drowned no human life was lost. 
The death roll was great, however, in other parts 
of California, where the fearful floods of that 
season are remembered with horror. Business 
conditions being ruined here j\Ir. Parrott went to 
the lower part of the state and passed the win- 
ter at China Town (now Placerville) and vicinity. 
The next spring he accomplished his long cherished 
purpose of reaching Nevada and made his head- 
quarters at Carson City. He very profitably pur- 
sued his trade here until 1869. During this time, 
however, on August 26, 1863, he was united in 
matrimony with Miss Eliza Tennessee Greer, a 
daughter of William and Anna (Jones) Greer. She 
was born in the Choctaw nation, of parents born 
in Virginia and Tennessee. Here three children 
were born. The oldest was George Austin, named 
from the capital of Texas and killed in 1882 by 
falling 200 feet down a mine shaft at Austin, Ne- 
vada. After this terrible fall he lived three months 
and fifteen days before death came to end his 
sufiferings. Their second child, William Henry, 
now resides at Lewistown, Mont., while the third, 
Ida May, is now Mrs. W. W. Bennett, of East 
Fork, Fergus county. 

In 1869 Mr. Parrott went to Truckee, Cal, for 
a year, then to Reno for one year, then 200 miles 
north to Surprise valley, where he bought property 
and engaged in real estate business and for the 
five years of his residence here made money. He 
was here during the exiting times of the Modoc 
war. The winter of 1875 and 1876 he passed at 
Winnemucca, Nev., thence went to Battle Moun- 
tain on the Central Pacific Railroad, and remained 
until December, 1882, when he came to Butte, ar- 
riving during the last days of the year. Here 
he engaged in business, but, in a few months, after 
doing a large business found the hundreds of 
dollars owing him entirely valueless, and in the 
picturesque language of the frontiersman he "went 
broke." With only ten cents in money, ruined by 
the credit system, he left Butte for Silver Star 
in Madison county, and after six months went to 
Boulder City, where ill luck still pursued him, and 
in a few months he transferred his residence to 
Jefferson and prospered here for one year. From 
here, in 1885, he came to Cottonwood, then the 
center of civilization tor this part of Meagher 



county, and established a blacksmith shop. In the 
fall of 1885 he purchased a fine ranch property on 
Cottonwood creek, three miles below Cottonwood 
village. To this he has added until this estate 
contains 800 acres of desirable land. He made his 
home on the ranch until Lewistown came into 
existence, when he removed thither and estab- 
lished the first blacksmith and ironworking shop of 
the infant city. He has been prospered here, and 
has been fortunate in making good investments in 
real estate. In 1897 he leased his shop and has 
since passed his time in looking after his landed 
property. He owns sixteen city lots in Lewistown, 
all in fine locations and many of them give good 
rental. On September 21, 1891, Mr. Parrott was a 
second time married, the bride being Mrs. Laura 
M. Conner. Her maiden name was Bailey, and 
her birth place was Trumbull county, Ohio, to 
which her parents removed from Meadville, Craw- 
ford county. Pa., in early pioneer days. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Parrott are valued members of the Lew- 
istown Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
has been a trustee. He has been a Knight of 
Pythias since July, 1876, and is past chancellor and 
master of the work in his local lodge. He has been 
a Republican from the organization of the party. 



JOHN C. PATTERSON, resident engineer and 
assistant superintendent of the engineering de- 
partment of the eastern district of the Great North- 
ern Railway, is located at Great Falls, Mont. He 
was born in Lawrence, Mass., on March 2, 1858, 
and is the son of John R. and Ann (Cameron) Pat- 
terson, both natives of Scotland. The father, born 
on March 10, 1827, came to the L^nited States In 
1848, and was engaged in different localities in New 
York and New England as foreman in woolen 
mills for many years. Since 1864 he has lived at 
Dexter, Maine, having retired from business several 
years ago. The paternal grandfather, John Patter- 
son, an emigrant from Scotland, settled in ]\Iaine, 
where he died in 1879. The Patterson family for 
many generations have been woolen manufacturers 
in Scotland. The mother of John C. Patterson was 
born in Scotland in 1825 and her marriage occurred 
at Lawrence, Mass., in 1848. Robert C. Patterson, 
a brother of J. C, is assistant cashier in the treas- 
urer's office of the Great Northern at St. Paul, and 
his other brother, Wm. H. Patterson, is prominently 
connected with woolen manufacturing in New Jer- 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



197 



sey. His only sister, Airs. Anna R. Scott, resides 
in Dexter, Maine. 

John C.Patterson was reared in Lawrence, Mass., 
and in Dexter, Maine, and received his education in 
the excellent public schools of the latter city and 
at the University of ]\Iaine at Orono. Here he 
was graduated as a civil engineer in the class of 

1878. He came to Minneapolis, Alinn., in May, 

1879, and was employed as a civil engineer on the 
Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad. From that 
time he has been occupied in railroad engineering 
and construction in the northwestern states, over 
twenty-two years in constant activity. In June, 
1889, Mr. Patterson came to ^Montana and took 
charge of the construction of the main line of the 
Northern Pacific into Butte, and upon this work 
he was engaged for a year, while the two succeeding 
years he was constructing new lines in Washington 
for the same company. In February, 1893, Mr. 
Patterson came to Great Falls as resident engineer 
on the Montana Central Railway, with the exception 
of five months when he was located in Anaconda as 
chief engineer of the Butte, Anaconda & Pacific Rail- 
way, continuing there until March i, 1902, when he 
removed to St. Paul to become the resident engineer 
and assistant superintendent of the engineering de- 
partment of the eastern district of the Great North- 
ern, extending from Minot to St. Paul, a most im- 
portant and responsible position which he is con- 
ducting with the conscientious fidelity and rare tech- 
nical ability that have so characterized his operations 
in the past. The important work of rebuilding the 
Great Northern's main line west of the Big Sandy 
into Great Falls, in progress since 1899, was accom- 
plished under his direction. The various changes 
of the line have involved some of the most elaborate 
and expensive pieces of railway construction ever 
undertaken in the state. In addition, also all the 
work of repairs and improvements to the road\va\' 
and structures of the Montana Central Railway was 
under Mr. Patterson's direction, which combine to 
make him one of the busiest men in the northwest. 

He is one of the most prominent members of the 
Montana Society of Engineers, and is a man of 
great executive ability, a master of his profession. 
Widel}- known throughout the state he is highly 
esteemed for his many admirable qualities of head 
and heart. In 1892 Mr. Patterson was united in 
marriage to Airs. Cordelia Krebs, at Spokane, 
W'asli. Their two sons are John A., born on June 
19, r8Q5, and ^\'illiam C, born on September 9, 
1S97. 



ROBERT PONTET.— In considering the life 
history of Mr. Pontet and incidentally touch- 
ing his ancestry, we are carried back to the days 
when the great Napoleon reigned, and when Wa- 
terloo was fought. Robert Pontet was born in 
Dublin, Ireland, on December 23, 1844. His father, 
Desire Pontet, was a native of Paris, France, born 
in 1798. In 1816, at the age of eighteen, he 
went from France to Ireland after the battle of 
Waterloo, for in the army of the great Napoleon he 
had served for several years and had been a partic- 
ipant in many adventures by flood and field. De- 
sire Pontet, having located in Dublin, took up the 
study of languages, graduating with high honors 
from Trinity College in 1826. For many years 
thereafter he was a teacher of languages in Dublin, 
where he died in 1873. The paternal grandfather 
of Robert Pontet was long a prominent and highly 
successful merchant in Paris. Robert Pontet's 
mother was previous to her marriage Miss Anna 
Marie Alaguire, born at Londonderry, Ireland. She 
died in Nice, France, in 1880. She was the daughter 
of James Maguire, a famous portrait painter. 

Robert Pontet attended the excellent schools of 
Dublin, but is really self-educated, as lie has won- 
derfully improved his subsequent advantages of 
acquiring that knowledge of which he was de- 
prived in his youth, for at the age of fourteen 
he went to sea. Always a close observer and an 
exceedingly good listener, be became thoroughly 
well informed in all of the practical affairs of life. 
From 1856 he sailed the seas, retiring in 1868, 
having been first officer on ' merchant sailing 
vessels, and afterwards on steam vessels. From 
1 861 to 1863 inclusive he was in the Bendigo mines 
of Australia, going from there to England. During 
the Paraguayan war in 1867-8, Air. Pontet served 
on a government transport. In 1868 he came 
to the United States from Buenos Ayres, and vis- 
ited successively Baltimore, Massachusetts, Wyo- 
ming, Chicago and Salt Lake City. At Rock creek 
and Evanston, Wyo., Mr. Pontet worked in the 
coal mines and also assisted in building the Union 
Pacific Railway. In 1870 he went to Chicago, 
passed one year sailing on the lakes out of that 
port, in the spring of 1871 going to Brainard. 
Alinn., where he was a contractor on the Northern 
Pacific in building bridges along its line. From 
Brainard he went to Fargo, and held his residence 
here until 1878. continuing with the bridge building 
service of the Northern Pacific between Fargo and 
liismarck until the road reached Bismarck and be- 



1 198 



PROGRESSIVE MEN OF MONTANA. 



ing foreman of the bridge train from 1874 until 
1876. In 1877 and 1878 he was clerk in the Sherman 
Hotel at Fargo, and from 1878 to 1880 he was 
freighting from Bismarck to the Black Hills. In 
the fall of 1880 he engaged in merchandising at 
Glendive, Mont., conducting this until 1887. Hav- 
ing passed the next two years at WilHston, Dak., 
he came to Great Falls in the winter of 1889. 
From 1893 unti